FredCDobbs

What Are You Watching Now?

2,481 posts in this topic

On 11/1/2017 at 4:53 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

Upon looking at my Netflix watchlist, I realized it was probably about time I did something about the 50-some movies on it. I have begun getting through this rather extensive list; I started "The Iron Giant" last night, although I didn't finish as I decided to be responsible and get enough sleep before I had to wake up early for my nannying job. 

I'm neglecting my Netflix watchlist and decided to re-watch Disney's "Mulan" for the umpteenth time. What can I say, Disney is my kryptonite. 

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On 11/1/2017 at 8:56 PM, speedracer5 said:

 

I am listening to the Boris Karloff/Bela Lugosi series on my podcast, "You Must Remember This" and it made me want to see the original Frankenstein.  I'm not typically a fan of horror movies, but I find the classic horror movies are more palatable than contemporary horror films.  Plus, I love Young Frankenstein which essentially pays homage to the Universal horror films, so I'd like to see where they got their original inspiration.  I thought I had recorded Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein, but I think they were recorded on my old DVR, which I had to trade in because the hard drive failed.  Obviously, these films were checked out from the library, but are due back soon, so I placed a request for both.  In my podcast, they keep including clips of Karloff speaking in his films and I can't help but picture "The Grinch" saying these words.

This is a very well done podcast. I recommend it to anyone interested in classic films and the behind the scenes stories.

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About to start the new Netflix mini-series, "Godless" and "Mudbound."  "Godless" is a Western and "Mudbound takes place during the 1930's I believe. I'm really living for these Netflix originals lately. I also just finished "Alias Grace," the miniseries based off Margaret Atwood's fictional novel based off a real-life event. I would recommend this latter show; I enjoyed it. 

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17 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

About to start the new Netflix mini-series, "Godless" and "Mudbound."  "Godless" is a Western and "Mudbound takes place during the 1930's I believe. I'm really living for these Netflix originals lately. I also just finished "Alias Grace," the miniseries based off Margaret Atwood's fictional novel based off a real-life event. I would recommend this latter show; I enjoyed it. 

Finished Godless; now on to Mudbound. 

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I'm watching some Liz Montgomery TV movies today. Currently I'm looking at one on YouTube she made in 1984.

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COCO (2017): I know I may have mentioned once or twice (lol) on here that I'm an avid Disney/Pixar fan, so it's really no surprise that I went and saw this in theaters today. I thoroughly enjoyed this animated feature. It made me laugh, cry, and everything in between. The importance of family was the main general theme here, which I think was a fantastic choice. Obviously, the animation was on point, as always. I also was glad that Pixar used actual Hispanic actors and actresses for this film, as the majority of the characters are, in fact, from Mexico. Cultural representation is important. 

SCORE: 4/5

Image result for coco

Image result for coco

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9 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I'm watching some Liz Montgomery TV movies today. Currently I'm looking at one on YouTube she made in 1984.

I like Liz Montgomery films too.  I have a trading friend in Canada that sent me some.  I am going to check out You Tube too.  She was a very talented actress .

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I'm watching the Ginger Rogers precode, Professional Sweetheart, from 1933.  I hadn't even heard of this film and saw it in the TCM schedule and had to record it.  I also recorded another of Ginger's precodes, Rafter Romance.  Not sure if I'll get to that one tonight or not. 

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9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm watching the Ginger Rogers precode, Professional Sweetheart, from 1933.  I hadn't even heard of this film and saw it in the TCM schedule and had to record it.  I also recorded another of Ginger's precodes, Rafter Romance.  Not sure if I'll get to that one tonight or not. 

Norman Foster, who went on to become a very prolific director, was her costar in these two films. Both are fun to watch. 

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Room 222--yes, I'm probably the only person here who has never seen it...the occasional laugh track seems a little odd...I spotted Terri Garr in the classroom!  I guess a lot of actors had bit parts...not a binge watch for me, but a 'click the next episode every few days' kind of thing. 

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On 12/2/2017 at 10:33 AM, shutoo said:

Room 222--yes, I'm probably the only person here who has never seen it...the occasional laugh track seems a little odd...I spotted Terri Garr in the classroom!  I guess a lot of actors had bit parts...not a binge watch for me, but a 'click the next episode every few days' kind of thing. 

I've never seen any episodes of it either. 

I'm watching DAY OF THE OUTLAW right now. One of my favourite independent westerns of the 1950s.

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OF MICE AND MEN (1992) 

I've read the novel, and was interested in watching the film (yes, I know there's a 1930's version). I figure maybe I'll watch both versions to compare. 

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11 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

OF MICE AND MEN (1992) 

I've read the novel, and was interested in watching the film (yes, I know there's a 1930's version). I figure maybe I'll watch both versions to compare. 

There's a very good 1980 TV movie version with Robert Blake and Randy Quaid. Lew Ayres plays Candy, the old guy with the dog. In this version, George & Lenny are cousins, and there's an added scene where George promises his aunt he will take care of Lenny no mater what.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

There's a very good 1980 TV movie version with Robert Blake and Randy Quaid. Lew Ayres plays Candy, the old guy with the dog. In this version, George & Lenny are cousins, and there's an added scene where George promises his aunt he will take care of Lenny no mater what.

I once watched all 3 of those in a row: the '39 version, the '80 version, and the '92 version. I was a fan of the book, and wanted to compare and contrast the three takes on it. All 3 are worth seeing.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I once watched all 3 of those in a row: the '39 version, the '80 version, and the '92 version. I was a fan of the book, and wanted to compare and contrast the three takes on it. All 3 are worth seeing.

I think it makes sense that they would be cousins, because why else would George continue to look after Lenny? He has nothing to gain from it...but if they're kin, then he feels some obligation. Given Blake's later legal troubles involving a real-life shooting, the end of this story, where he kills Quaid, is all the more ironic.

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3 hours ago, RipMurdock said:

a recording of Cool Hand Luke.

That was a role Newman was made for (unlike Rocky!).

 

 

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Watching some fun episodes of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes on Britbox. I've said it before, but Jeremy Brett is so totally perfect in this role. David Burke is equally good as Watson.

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Watched House of Strangers on Sunday as part of MOVIES Sunday-night-noir programming.   E.G. Robinson and Richard Conte are the male stars,  with Susan Hayward as the girl Conte is after.    I can't think of another film where the women is as cold and mean as how Susan plays it here.   The scene in the bar after Conte has told her he will be marrying a family friend (mostly to please his father),   still makes me shiver.    The looks she gives were so real and convincing as it related to the bitterness seeping out of her skin.  

To me Hayward rarely comes off as warm and loving,  even in comedies or drama where her character is by design that way.    Something about the eyes I guess that just leaves me with the jitters.   :lol: 

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15 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Watched House of Strangers on Sunday as part of MOVIES Sunday-night-noir programming.   E.G. Robinson and Richard Conte are the male stars,  with Susan Hayward as the girl Conte is after.    I can't think of another film where the women is as cold and mean as how Susan plays it here.   The scene in the bar after Conte has told her he will be marrying a family friend (mostly to please his father),   still makes me shiver.    The looks she gives were so real and convincing as it related to the bitterness seeping out of her skin.  

To me Hayward rarely comes off as warm and loving,  even in comedies or drama where her character is by design that way.    Something about the eyes I guess that just leaves me with the jitters.   :lol: 

Maybe you're right about the eyes, but Hayward was perfect at playing the hard-luck woman who was dealt a bad hand..like I Want to Live! and I'll Cry Tomorrow.

As far as the coldest female characters, I'd still give the tip to Bette Davis watching her husband suffer in The Little Foxes, and Gene Tierney calmly watching the boy drown in Leave Her to Heaven.

 

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27 minutes ago, shutoo said:

Maybe you're right about the eyes, but Hayward was perfect at playing the hard-luck woman who was dealt a bad hand..like I Want to Live! and I'll Cry Tomorrow.

As far as the coldest female characters, I'd still give the tip to Bette Davis watching her husband suffer in The Little Foxes, and Gene Tierney calmly watching the boy drown in Leave Her to Heaven.

 

Hayward was perfect at those hard-luck women.    Also some great choices for coldest female characters and the motives for each being the way they were,  being far different.   

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