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DownGoesFrazier

Noir encyclopedia

43 posts in this topic

I certainly agree with you that if the conversation ( or trivia) on these boards is about movies, it should be about classic movies, not recent movies. There are a number of people who seem to disagree, on the premise that these boards are for filmlovers, and filmlovers love films from all eras. Therefore , they should be able to post (or ask trivia questions) about films from all eras on these boards. I disagree........How could I forget about ROAD HOUSE?

 

Edited by: finance on Jun 26, 2010 9:48 AM

 

Edited by: finance on Jun 26, 2010 9:57 AM

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What other noir films did Ida Lupino appear in? Does They Drive by Night count? I'm a very big fan of Ida. I know she directed too, but I'm not sure if I've seen any of her films. Did she direct any that could be considered Noir?

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> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote}

> finance wrote:

> *To revisit previous territory, I am pretty sure that there are no bowling noirs. (although Stanwyck's stepdaughter was supposed to be going bowling with her friends in DI)*

>

> Of course there is. There's ROAD HOUSE, specifically the scenes where Ida Lupino in short shorts, halter and espadrilles is taught by Cornel Wilde how to bowl in the bowling alley that's somehow a part of that roadhouse complex (!).

>

> Edited by: Arturo on Jun 25, 2010 8:03 PM

 

There is also a bowling neonoir - *The Big Lebowski*.

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WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS is a noir from Lang, which Ida appears in along with a number of other stars. BEWARE MY LOVELY and ON DANGEROUS GROUND, both also with Robert Ryan, are noirs. I believe there are others. THE BIGAMIST, which she directed, is not really a noir.

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One last soccer question...... Why is there a team "England" rather than :"Great Britain" ? Don't they play soccer in Scotland, Wales, and NI?

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When I was living in London--the Tube workers used to tell me to go home when Team Scotland played in the city. They said no decent woman was safe on the street with the Scottish team about. Apparently they divide them up that way.

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS is a noir from Lang, which Ida appears in along with a number of other stars. BEWARE MY LOVELY and ON DANGEROUS GROUND, both also with Robert Ryan, are noirs. I believe there are others. THE BIGAMIST, which she directed, is not really a noir.

 

All it needed was a murder.

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True. This came up before. Can you have a noir with no crime in the film? The best example is SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS. Though there is plenty of bad behavior, there is no real crime in the film, yet many classify it as a noir..

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}

> True. This came up before. Can you have a noir with no crime in the film? The best example is SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS. Though there is plenty of bad behavior, there is no real crime in the film, yet many classify it as a noir..

 

That is a GREAT topic...I think there are several examples....DAISY KENYON is labeled noir by Fox and it hardly is....I smell a new thread (care to start it). I also been meaning to start a thread inspired by some back and forth banter between me and misswonderly in a thread where we took a simple film and threw in some twists that turned it into a noir.

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The book Film Noir by Silver Ward list Sweet Smell as a noir and gives a very good explaination of why. The basic reason being that Sidney Falco is a noir protagonist because their 'desperate, misguided ambition, and their delusion that they are important people , when actually they are cruelly manipulated by almost everyone'. It then goes on to say 'these men commit crimes or actions that hopelessly ensnare them,,,'.

 

Thus a noir doesn't need a crime but only thos 'actions that hopelessly ensnare them'.

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Lupino's THE BIGAMIST is listed as a noirin the noir encyclopedia. Bigamy, though, is not really the type of crime I had in mind

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That Ida movie isn't listed in my version of the book Film Noir (mine is from 1979), by Silver Ward.

 

Just goes to show what is noir is subjective.

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Other no-crime noirs:

 

*Caught* (Ophuls, 1949)

*Clash by Night* (Lang, 1952)

 

In the what-if-there's-a-crime-but-only-in-a-dream noir category: *The Woman in the Window* (Lang, 1945)

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Sounds like a great book for a coffee table :(. I've owned a few like this one myself; they're all pretty much the same. The problem is the encyclopedia format itself. Opaque. It gives you a thumbnail reference for each film, usually very tiny print. Date, studio, cast, crew. One title after another. Ultimately I tossed all such books away. There's no intelligence to be gained from it; no meaning. Only factoids and information but no sense.

 

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8 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Sounds like a great book for a coffee table :(. I've owned a few like this one myself; they're all pretty much the same. The problem is the encyclopedia format itself. Opaque. It gives you a thumbnail reference for each film, usually very tiny print. Date, studio, cast, crew. One title after another. Ultimately I tossed all such books away. There's no intelligence to be gained from it; no meaning. Only factoids and information but no sense.

 

Yes O Great and Pompous one You are a legend in your own mind

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