THEMovieman

Ultimate Movie Trivia

3,204 posts in this topic

She needed a back brace because she had sustained a pinched nerve, from being thrown down the stairs, while pregnant, by her then-husband.

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 14, 2010 3:12 PM

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Thanks, Lavender.

 

Name at least 3 films from the period 1955-1960 that had a key plot theme of a romance between a married man or widower well over 40 and a woman well under 30.

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I'll have to give it to cujas, since she was first. I was also thinking of THE APARTMENT. Was Astaire a widower in DADDY LONGLEGS?

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 15, 2010 11:17 AM

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 15, 2010 11:21 AM

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Finance--I really don't know--when in doubt I go with the hoofer! Lavendar can have this one. But it was great your showing us about all that male chauvinism in the '50's.

 

Lavendar up next--

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OK--Here goes:

 

Bette Davis was a resounding success in *The Letter*. But the actress who created the role on stage also had a resounding success co-starring with Bette in one of her WB classics.

 

Please name the actress and the film she co-starred in with Miss Davis.

 

Edited by: cujas on Jul 15, 2010 6:05 PM

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Dame Gladys Cooper originated the Bette Davis role in "The Letter" on the London stage . She played Mrs. Henry Vale in "Now, Voyager"...

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As Dame Cooper would have said, "Excellent, well played."

 

Mudskipper is up!

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Thanks....Name the director who became frustrated after his two balding stars were unable to hear his instructions.. and said: " Fifty years in this **** business, and what do I end up doing? Directing two deaf hairpieces !"...Who were the two stars ? What was the title of the movie they were trying to make ?...

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''You think that not being caught in a lie is the same thing as telling the truth'' was used in *The Slender Thread*, *This Property is Condemned*, *Three Days of the Condor* and *The Interpreter* and was written by screenwriter David Rayfiel

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Thanks, Mr.6s?I found it in an online LA Times article?I was thinking *Three Days of the Condor*, that?s probably the most obvious?will be back with some bit of trivia?

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This writer got his Hollywood foothold through a neophyte studio head. He was involved in the production of a number of successful movies, but one in particular was a landmark as well as a major hit.

 

Who is he, what?s the landmark film?

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This fellow was an executive with Paramount, MGM and Lorimar. He held a very long tenure as editor of a daily entertainment magazine. He and another former studio exec co-hosted a long-running film biz talk show on a basic cable network and the two are now co-hosting a similar show with a different name on a premium channel?his mentor, the neophyte studio head, is more-or-less infamous?

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The common perception is that Grace Kelly retired from films because she married Prince Rainier. However, there was a major disappointment in her film career which also contributed to her exit from Hollywood. What was it?

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 21, 2010 10:46 AM

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 21, 2010 3:22 PM

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Regarding her Oscar-winning role in "The Country Girl":

 

The range she covered in this role showed her potential for giving complex performances in roles not of her normal type. Unfortunately her studio, MGM, subsequently gave her no comparable role; they suspended her for turning down two of their choices...

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