THEMovieman

Hitchcock Mania

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OK ... Looks like no takers !!!

 

In the auction scene in *North By Northwest,* James Mason's character (Vandamm) admonishes Cary Grant's character (Roger Thornhill aka George Kaplan): "Has anyone ever told you that you overplay your various roles rather severely, Mr. Kaplan .. Seems to me that you fellows could use a little less training from the FBI and a little more from the Actors Studio."

 

Martin Landau, Mason's evil cohort who played the part of Leonard in NBNW, had just studied under *Actors Studio* founder *Lee Strasberg,* and came to Hitchcock's attention shortly thereafter.

Landau and Steve McQueen were the only two selected of approximately 2000 would-be actors auditioning to study under Strasberg in 1958. Strasberg became the foremost proponent of "the Method," an introspective, sensory-recall acting technique founded in part on the teachings of Stanislavsky (the most famous disciple of the Method was, of course, Marlon Brando). Though extremely influential in the film, TV, and theatrical world of the 1960s, Landau founded the Actors Studio's west coast branch in Los Angeles and,other than the New York location, the only sanctioned branch.

 

 

Cinecrazy DC

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Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck? (He had wanted Cooper for FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT and SABOTEUR, and Stanwyck for SABOTEUR)

 

Edited by: finance on Sep 21, 2010 4:19 PM

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Name 3 post-1939 Hitchcock films that took place primarily in California, 1 that took place in Canada, 1 that took place in the middle Atlantic region (other than New York), and 1 that took place in New England.

 

Edited by: finance on Sep 23, 2010 11:05 AM

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*Vertigo* - *The Birds* - *Shadow of a Doubt* - all take place in CA.

 

*I Confess* takes place in Canada

 

*The Trouble With Harry* takes place in New England

 

*Marnie* takes place in the Mid-Atlantic region

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That's the one Movieman. Because of the weather many scenes were filmed in a gymnasuim. A 500 lb. technicolor camera fell from the ceiling narrowly missing Hitchcock, according to imdb. Good job,Your thread

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Lavender, if you're out there beg pardon ... Looks like a couple of days have passed .... Cinecrazy DC

 

 

?One man's drama is another man's melodrama?

WHY I MAKE MELODRAMAS (1936)

Article by Alfred Hitchcock

 

?Actors should be treated like cattle?

 

?Always make the audience suffer as much as possible?

 

?Good evening?

Introduction to the TV series *Alfred Hitchcock Presents*

 

?Mr. Landau, I?ll only give you direction if I don?t like what you?re doing.?

Supposed to have been said to Martin Landau on the set of *North by Northwest* ? source: M. Landau

 

And a sixth quotation ...

 

?If it?s a good movie, the sound could go off and the audience would still have a perfectly clear idea of what was going on.?

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Hitch was noted for having his movies take place in famous and well-recognized places (Mt. Rushmore and the UN Building in *North by Northwest*, Statue of Liberty in *Saboteur*, etc).

Since I'm from Washington, DC, which three movies (at least to my knowledge) had scenes set in our nation's capital ? For extra credit, name the movie in which there is a scene that takes place in a major city near Washington (less than 100 miles away)?

 

Cinecrazy DC

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Looks like you know your Hitchcock venues pretty well, finance.

 

Probably the best example is *Strangers on a Train* with one of the opening scenes set at Washington's historic Union Station (it has since been restored to its heyday - which, ironically, would have been when the film took place in the 1940's) and Bruno (Robert Walker) is seen on the steps of the Jefferson Memorial. The amusement park scene is also suggestive of the famous (and now defunct) Glen Echo Park near Bethesda, which was popular with GI's and their girls during and after World War II.

 

*Topaz* also has a scene -- the Russian defector and his family are being toured down Pennsylvania Avenve by John Forsythe.

 

I don't recall any Washington scenes in *Foreign Correspondent*; most of the action took place in Europe. There is a stateside scene at the beginning, but that's supposed to be New York harbor.

The other one I was thinking of is *North by Northwest.* There is a scene where "the Professor" (Leo Carrol) and company are sitting in an office contemplating the fate of Cary Grant (aka Roger Thornhill/Mr. Kaplan). Through their window, you can see what appears to be the US Capitol.

 

You also score with *Marnie* - her mother Bernice (Louise Latham) is seen in a brownstone with the famous "white steps" near Baltimore Harbor.

 

Your thread -

 

*CinecrazyDC*.

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