ClassicViewer

LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...

1,142 posts in this topic

I would Safety Last was the best movie I saw last week. I also liked Cafe Lumiere. It, by contrast did not do that much for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=skimpole wrote:}{quote}

> It, by contrast did not do that much for me.

 

That's such a great straight line, but I'll pass. This isn't the place to be too suggestive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Black Swan was the most interesting movie I saw last week. Keane was also fairly striking and 12:08 from Bucharest was interesting, though its deadpan tone is definitely not for everyone. By contast The Town struck me as rather flawed (would you sleep with the bank robber who kidnapped and whose colleague brutalized your boss if he looked like Ben Affleck) and it has an ending that could be best described as "convenient." Tarnation didn't mean that too much, while Tristam Shandy: A **** and Bull Story strikes me as a bit like the novel: ingenious in places, but then too wrapped up in its own solipsism. Half Nelson was more interesting, but it didn't quite click for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should add that I saw Once last week as well. Some of the songs were good, but if most love stories in movies aren't that interesting, I must confess I wasn't attracted to this not really a love story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started off with Sounder. I saw that at the Twin Cinema in 1972. (There were three theatres, but in a town of Twin Falls, everyone had a fit about calling our fancy new complex a Tri-Cinema. Nowadays, there are 12 shows going on at a time, and the place still has its old Twin Cinema sign)

Sounder was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen. All that magnificent, clear color.

 

The next movie was Born Free! Then, Casey's Shadow. I had a wonderful day off work.

 

I haven't seen any bad movies, lately. I am at the library now because I could not stand one more minute of Extreme Couponing on TLC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rachel Getting Married: and actually the endless jam sessions are kind of cool. So many movies today are coldly utilitarian. In thrillers, unless they're made by Quientin Tarnatino, nobody ever says an irrelevant piece of information or goes off an tangent. If there's an odd detail not immediately relevant to the narrative, you know it will come up later as a plot point. (I remember The Long Kiss Goodnight being particularly egregious in this respect.)

 

By contrast The World of Henry Orient and The Yearling didn't mean that much to me. 21 Grams struck me as somewhat contrived and in the end appeared more melodramtic than it should have been. Looking at 127 hours I actually found Danny Boyle's film making tics rather annoying. The King's Speech was amusing, but also irritatingly superficial. Not a good argument for constitutional monarchy to hang the morale of the country in the one war it cannot afford to lose on a mediocre stutterer. (Also, it ignores the fact that George VI was actually a supporter of appeasement.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw quite a few movies last week: Show Boat, Amen, Kiss me, Stupid, The Squid and the Whale, In Bruges, The Outlaw, Grindhouse, L'Enfant, and Iron Man. Of these movies L'Enfant was clearly the best, and probably the best movie I've seen in some weeks. Show Boat, by contrast meant little to me, even after seeing it twice. The Squid and the Whale also didn't make much of an impression. I suspect that much of the admiration it got was because the wife/mother was a prominent New York film critic. For those who knew her personally this would have been fascinating film making. For those who don't the characters just aren't that interesting, nor are their lives. The Outlaw is clearly the less interesting movie, Hughes was an idiot to replace Howard Hawks with himself, and there must be something mad about going to ridiculous lengths to remind everyone of Jane Russell's chest, and then put her in a movie with a man who prefer his horse to her. Amen was fine, competent, subtly sickening drama, while Kiss me, Stupid," had a nice, acrid taste. Iron Man was a bit disappointing, with too many special effects and not enough Robert Downey, Jr. In Bruges was better, but I missed an absolutely vital scene because I turned my head at the wrong instant. Tarantino's half of Grindhouse+ was clearly better than Rodriguez's, great dialogue and a decent car chase. By contrast, I'm really beginning to find mass slaughter and near extinction in zombie movies kind of repulsive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the best movie I saw last week was Red Cliff I, which was interesting and exciting, and only slightly flawed by the fact that it is only one half of the movie. Sylvia Scarlett was interesting, and so was City Streets. By contrasted Wanted became increasingly viscious and uninteresting, and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner was deeply flawed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True Grit, the Coen Brothers version, was more better than I thought it would be. It is less offensive, but less original, than their previous best picture nominees. It can't claim much inherent interest, since it is so similar to the Henry Hathaway version. DOA started out interestingly, and then became increasingly baroque. The Kids Are all Right was in some ways less impressive than True Grit. It's all well to say that lesbian headed families are just like everyone else, but everyone else isn't in the top 10% income bracket. Hopscotch had some nice touches, but the most interesting movie I saw last week was Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I recall, in one post when you pointed out that a director was Canadian, I listed some of my favorite Canadian directors, including Maddin. Back a few pages in the "Lists" thread, I listed my favorite US and Canadian directors. I know there was one Canadian director I was forgetting. I hoped you would come back with the names of some more. Alas, I guess you were away from the board then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course you know that a French -Canadian film, *Incendies*, directed by Dennis Villeneuve, has been nominated as "Best Foreign Language Film" for the Oscars this year. I regret, I have not as yet seen it. Plan to.

I'm surprised and annoyed that *Barney's Version*, based on the Canadian novel of the same name by Mordecai Richler, was snubbed and received an insulting one category nomination (for make-up). Now to be honest, I haven't seen that yet either. But by all accounts it deserved more attention than that.

Anyway, I don't put much credence in the Oscars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> Anyway, I don't put much credence in the Oscars.

 

I prefer the gouramis myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Quince Tree Sun was probably the best movie that I saw last week. By contrast George C. Scott in The Hospital was good, but the film wasn't on the same quality (and there's a making your way to love by **** your object of affection scene). Cimarron deserves its reputation as one of the worst Best Pictures. The Story of Louis Pasteur was reasonably competent, but Anna Christie was rather dull. The Last Metro was not one of my favorite Truffaut movies, although the ending was a nice touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually all the movies I saw last week were fairly good, but The Circle by Jahir Panahi and Red Cliff, Part Two were clearly the best. But that doesn't mean one shouldn't like Red Headed Woman. Actually it's incredible what Jean Harlow gets away with in that movie. Also, Il Divo about former Giullio Andreotti was also quite watchable. Actually only The War Game was a bit disappointing. I know it was banned by the BBC but even in the sixties it should have been clear that a nuclear war would have been a lot worse than the firebombing of Dresden, or even the destruction of Hiroshima.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The movies I saw this week were not so hot, though I got a chance to rewatch White Nights and recognized its virtues more (I mean the 1957 Visconti movie, not the 1985 cold war thriller where Lionel Richie got a number one single). Stella Dallas is good at showing Barbara Stanwyck as an actress. Astaire and Rogers' numbers in Follow the Fleet were excellent as always, but the supporting story was a lot less interesting than in the other four Astaire/Rogers films. Carnal Knowledge reveals once again that Mike Nichols is not my favorite film maker. The Paleface shows that, contrary to Christopher Hitchens, Bob Hope could actually be funny. Far From Heaven seemed more like an amazingly exact postmodern imitation of Douglas Sirk than an actual movie. Regular Lovers deserves another look, even if it could be said to be a duller version of The Mother and the ****.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Devil Doll" -- hands down, best movie of the week. All the ingredients there, and compelling as hell -- you know you should look away, but lord help you, ya can't. Everything--that little shop, Barrymore, the wickedness. Ok, and the subterranean shop you walk by in NY every day. Well, it was groovy.xoxo1968B2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being in the desirable/undesirable position of having the flu, I saw a heap of movies this past week and not my usual viewing times.

Best of the week was revisiting BLACK NARCISSUS '47 last Sunday. It's a commitment to watch, but so worth every minute. Deborah Kerr is gorgeous as a nun making the story even more compelling. It's definitely a P&P film that works.

 

Also enjoyed MRS MINIVER '42 and GOODBYE AGAIN '61. Mr Tiki pointed out many films I urge him to watch with me feature strong women & mothers. Guess that appeals to me.

 

Worst of the week was the only Melvyn Douglas movie I caught on his day, pity. ON THE LOOSE '51 was so awful, contrived and badly acted it belongs on Mystery Science Theater. Dangerously close in theme to MST3K's I ACCUSE MY PARENTS. Melvyn was despicable in the first half and his horrific wife took an unrealistic 360 turn near the end. An embarrassment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the movie The Fallen Idol, that came on last week. I think a week or so before I really enjoyed the movie Caught, with James Mason and Barbare Bel Geddes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us