Sign in to follow this  
cujas

From Broadway to Hollywood

1,708 posts in this topic

Thanks. Here's a multi-part question. In 1919, Harry Frazee, the owner of the Boston Red Sox, sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for cash so he could finance a Broadway show. Most people think that the show was "No, No, Nanette", but that show didn't open until 1925. The show that he backed in 1919 became the basis for 'No, No, Nanette". There were several movie versions of "No, No, Nanette". One in 1930 featured Zasu Pitts in a supporting role playing a character named Pauline. In another version around 1940, Zasu Pitts played Pauline again. In the same 1940 film, another actress played a character named Kitty. Around 1950, a different version with a different title was made, and the actress who played Kitty in 1940 was now cast as Pauline. What was the name of the 1919 Broadway show that started it all, what was the name of the early fifties version, and who was the now well known actress who was in both the 1940 and 1950 versions? By the way, in the 1930 version, none of the original songs from the Broadway show were used. In the 1940 version, only the title song and two others were used. Those three songs were all that made it through to the 1950 version. Can you name those other two songs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, the original 1919 Broadway play financed by the Babe Ruth sale was "My Lady Friends"....the 1950 version was "Tea For Two", which starred Doris Day and Gordon MacRae....The actress who was in the 1940 and 1950 versions was Eve Arden....and the three songs that made it from the 1940 to the 1950 movie are: "No, No Nanette", "Tea For Two", and "I Want To Be Happy"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct on all counts, Mudskipper. Of course, it was revived on Broadway in the early seventies. Ruby Keeler came out of retirement to appear in the show and Busby Berkeley was hired as choreographer. Your thread, skip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this famous Broadway musical, one of the songs was given to the leading lady just minutes before the New York preview, provoking her famous quote: "Of course darling, but do try to get it to me the night before.." The show was later made into a huge movie production with different lead actors and a different lead actress...What was the title of the musical ? Who was the original lead actress on Broadway ? What was the title of the song that was belatedly given to her.?..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's so strange is that Joshua Logan didn't cast or couldn't cast the three Broadway leads in the movie. Richard Burton was replaced by Richard Harris; Julie Andrews by Vanessa Redgrave; and Robert Goulet by Franco Nero...If you listen to the soundtrack CDs, the Broadway version is much better than the movie version...I think Logan had the same problem with "Paint Your Wagon"....I think those movies could have been as good as "Fiddler On The Roof" or "My Fair Lady".... Your thread, Fi..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This actor starred in several important Broadway musicals in the period 1920-1940. On screen, however, he was almost always a supporting player, except for one major dramatic film of the '30s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Victor Moore starred in Gershwin shows--"Oh, Kay!", "Of Thee I Sing" and "Let Them Eat Cake!"

 

starred in *Make Way For Tommorrow*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And Fi, that was a terrific question!

 

*Girl Crazy* was the Broadway show that made Ethel Merman a star. Opening night in the pit, Gershwin himself conducted the 6 musicians. 5 went on to made names for themselves in the Big Band era. A 6th musician became one of the most important artistic contributors to the Hollywood Movie Musical.

 

Please name the musician that went from Broadway musicals to Hollywood Movie Musicals.

 

(For fun, you can also name the Big Band Biggies!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, indeed, Roger Edens, Judy's musical godfather, and the kingpin of the MGM Freed musicals,

 

along with the big band guys.

 

Fi, you're batting 1,000, whatever that means.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This film star, unlike many of his peers, often returned to Broadway. He did, though, turn down a plum Broadway role. He regretted his decision, and later played that role on film. Actor? Role?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frederic March was offered "Death of A Salesman" on Broadway and turned it down.

 

March later played the role of Willy Loman for the movies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I had no idea Frederic March played Willy. I looked it up and saw that Mildred Dunnock was his wife, and I believe she was also the wife on stage in the Lee J. Cobb original production.

O.K. Here is one back. This actor was the original "Golden Boy" in the Clifford Odets play on stage, although William Holden played the role (his big break) in the film. The stage actor who played the "Golden Boy" later became a very big anti-hero-style star, and died relatively young.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I guessed correctly, Finance will tell me and I shall give the next question.

 

That's how it's done.

 

Finance will be the next member on this thread.

 

Edited by: cujas on Oct 22, 2010 5:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a reply to Leslie:

 

Clifford Odets' drama, "Golden Boy", was actually initially written for John Garfield who had a lot of anti-hero roles on film, but the movie's William Holden role of Joe Bonaparte was originally played by Luther Adler on Broadway...although John Garfield did have a supporting role...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a reply to Mr.MS--

 

You know, we been talking about "Humoresque"--always saw it as a great consolation prize for Garfield. And it's a better movie anyway.

 

Next question:

 

Back to Cole Porter and Broadway--

 

If Gene Kelly was discovered in a Broadway Chorus, so were other MGM Musical Comedy Peformers.

 

On the distaff side, Let's go to the dancing girls in Porter's "Panama Hattie" in 1940.

 

This show turned out to be a gold mine for the future of the MGM musical.

 

3 Chorus Girls from this show went on to stardom at MGM.

 

1 Chorus Girl went on to marry the biggest star at MGM.

 

 

 

Please Name all 4 dancers in the chorus who had bright futures ahead of them.

 

 

Take it away!

 

Edited by: cujas on Oct 23, 2010 4:26 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, June, Vera-Ellen and Lucille all became Metro stars, while Betsy married Metro's biggest star, Gene Kelly.

 

Fi's Turn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us