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yanceycravat

Carl Reiner's THE COMIC

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Carl Reiner's THE COMIC is one of my favorite movies about movies!

 

I can't believe it's not on DVD but it's finally being shown on TCM. Decemeber 30, 2010!

 

Van Dyke as a fallen Stan Laurel type silent film star and Mickey Rooney as his side kick, "Cockeye" give wonderful performances.

 

This film is long overdue for some appreciation!

 

Have I missed a thread somewhere? I can't believe more people aren't as excited as I am about this movie playing on TCM.

 

Anyone else love this movie as much as me?

 

Yancey

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i have never seen *the comic*, however i adore reiner and van dyke's work

on "the dick van dyke show" and am curious to see what they came up with

in a theatrical feature. i'm sure it's good.

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Thanks yanceycravat for posting this alert! I might have easily passed over it.

 

I have never seen this movie either, but pretty much LOVE anything Carl Reiner has done. I once saw a DVD on $4.99 clearance and saw he was director so took a chance-it's now one of my favorites! (All of Me)

*The Dick Van Dyke Show* is just as fresh & funny as it was when first released. Haha, remember all Alan Brady's toup?s?

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Ever wonder who exactly the film was based on? The two most obvious choices are Buster Keaton and of course the mighty Chaplin. Certainly, in this movie Reiner covered a lot of territory on the past lives of various famous silent film stars. Those stars of the silent era that were still alive at the time of the movie's release, didn't have much to say or didn't even bother to see the film. Amazingly, the film did receive a lot of good reviews, but not enough to make it an overall succes at the boxoffice . . . How strange.

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His womanizing problems remind me of Chaplin, but the way he makes his living in his later years by taking buffoonish roles reminds me of Keaton.

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> phroso you wrote:

> His womanizing problems remind me of Chaplin, but the way he makes his living in his later years by taking buffoonish roles reminds me of Keaton.

 

Definitely!

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The film is generally considered to be based on Keaton who, like the character Billy Bright, also had a problem with alcohol, had extramarital relationships (Norma TAlmadge, supposedly, at one point deiced to cease being a wife to Keaton - whether this precipitated or sprang from the affairs I don';t know) and from the early 1930s on pretty much had to accept whatever job offer came his way.

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Count me as another fan of this film -- I've been waiting 30+ years to see it again! When I first saw the December schedule a while back, THE COMIC stood out as the one film I didn't want to miss during that month (although there are certainly many, many other good movies on the schedule).

 

I don't remember the details of the movie all that well because it's been so long since I last saw it. But I do remember it making a big impression on me when I saw it on TV in the 70s, encouraging me to become a fan of silent movies, which may have been one goal of Mr. Van Dyke and Mr. Reiner.

 

When I first saw it, I figured that Van Dyke's character was probably based on Stan Laurel. I knew from Dick's impersonation of Laurel on the DVD Show that he was a fan of Laurel's, and I think I even knew that Laurel had spent his last years in some obscurity. But now that I've learned more about Keaton, I would agree that the career depicted in THE COMIC seems a lot like his, even if some of the details were changed. (Both Keaton and Laurel were gone by the time THE COMIC was released.)

 

Great choice, TCM!

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I read once, perhaps it was on IMDB, that during the Dick Van Dyke show, Van Dyke called Stan Laurel to get clearance for a Laurel and Hardy bit.

 

Van Dyke he was shocked to find out from Stan that neither Stan nor Ollie owned the rights to their characters and subsequently their own likenesses.

 

It seems impossible to believe but I guess it's plausible. Perhaps the Hal Roach company owned them and or their rights were sold when Hal Roach sold his library.

 

Mostly it seems rather sad and typical.

 

Anyone know the details of this?

 

Yancey

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This film is long overdue for some appreciation!

 

Yes it is. It's funny, sad and unpredictable. How many movies can you say that about? Van Dyke is wonderful in a role that calls specifically for his amazing talents. Michelle Lee is beautiful and sensitive as his wife. The silent film montage is so funny it could literally kill you! The film wasn't a hit. It has some awkward moments. But the good parts far outweigh the bad. A fan of movies, comedy or fine acting should see it.

 

Dick Van Dyke...he may not be a great actor, great singer or dancer. But consider all the things he did rather well and you have one of the most talented performers I've ever seen!

 

"Rob, will you quit playing with that intercom?"

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Not only was Van Dyke's Laurel impersonation a classic, Henry Calvin did the best Oliver Hardy I've ever seen! Calvin was the bumbling Sgt. Garcia on Disney's ZORRO show.

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*I read once, perhaps it was on IMDB, that during the Dick Van Dyke show, Van Dyke called Stan Laurel to get clearance for a Laurel and Hardy bit.*

 

I think Van Dyke has been a big fan of Stan Laurel's since he was a young boy. When he got to Hollywood he looked Stan up by finding his name in the Santa Monica phone book. They became good friends and Van Dyke delivered the eulogy when Stan passed away.

 

He was also a big fan of Buster Keaton.

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> {quote:title=yanceycravat wrote:}{quote}

> Van Dyke he was shocked to find out from Stan that neither Stan nor Ollie owned the rights to their characters and subsequently their own likenesses.

> {quote:title=yanceycravat wrote:}{quote}

 

Long, detailed, sad story, short version...

 

In the early 1960s Larry Harmon (of "Bozo" fame) contracted with Stan, and Lucille Hardy, for marketing rights to Laurel & Hardy, specifically for his planned cartoon series and misc. tie-in products. Somewhere along the way, Harmon leveraged the agreement to secure trademark rights to L&H in perpetuity.

 

The Harmon TM ownership has been challenged in the past by the families, but upheld.

 

The Harmon situation has no bearing on the films.

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> {quote:title=Shemp wrote:}{quote}

>

 

> In the early 1960s Larry Harmon (of "Bozo" fame) contracted with Stan, and Lucille Hardy, for marketing rights to Laurel & Hardy, specifically for his planned cartoon series and misc. tie-in products. Somewhere along the way, Harmon leveraged the agreement to secure trademark rights to L&H in perpetuity.

>

> The Harmon TM ownership has been challenged in the past by the families, but upheld.

>

 

All I can say is Larry Harmon seems to have been an awful and selfish person... It makes me quite angry to read this.

 

Truthfully, I never liked clowns! This makes me dislike them even more. What a horrible, horrible man.

Yancey

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I will definitely be watching The Comic. It is a howl! Van Dyke was never funnier.

 

Edited by: The_Destroyer on Oct 27, 2010 10:49 PM

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