allaboutlana

Do You Know This Song?

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Oops, sorry.  I like this song and I've heard Fred Astaire's version of it (I prefer his version), so I got the two versions confused. 

 

 

 

Next:  In a 1950s musical film, this song was sung by a well-known comedian, sung and danced to by a group of showgirls and sung as a charming duet by a man and a young girl. 

 

Please name the song, the film, the comedian, and the man and girl (who sang the duet). 

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Ah, at last I've got it!  The song is My Lucky Charm from Meet Me in Las Vegas.  It was sung by Jerry Colonna and then done as a duet (I agree, very charming) by Dan Dailey and Mitsuko Sawamura.

 

We have a winner!  Good job, Star.  Thanks for the video clips.  The thread is all yours.

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OK, here's one.  Do you recognize these lyrics?

 

 

I've locked my heart

I'll keep my feelings there

I've stocked my heart

With icy, frigid air

And I mean to care for no one...

 

 

Please name the song, the singer and the film.

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Azure,

 

I believe these lyrics are from the song I'm Through With Love sung by Marilyn Monroe in "Some Like It Hot".  It was also sung by Woody Allen in his film "Everyone Says I Love You".

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Azure,

 

I believe these lyrics are from the song I'm Through With Love sung by Marilyn Monroe in "Some Like It Hot".  It was also sung by Woody Allen in his film "Everyone Says I Love You".

 

You got it!  That was a very quick response.  I didn't realize that Woody Allen also sang this song.  Thanks for sharing that fact. 

 

OK, your turn, Marsha.

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Thanks, Azure.

 

Do you recognize these lyrics?

 

You walked into my lonely world

What piece of mind your smile unfurled

 

Please name the song, who sang it, and the film.

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The song is You, My Lovesung by Frank Sinatra and Doris Day in Young at Heart.  For your viewing pleasure, here's the clip:

 

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Absolutely correct, starliteyes. The song itself, with lyrics by Mack Gordon and music by Jimmy Van Heusen, is absolutely sublime and the duet by Doris Day and Frank Sinatra is one of the best from any musical film. I always wished they had sung together more than just this once during the movie. Their voices blend so beautifully.  I love this song and I love this movie. It's a film I can watch over and over again.

 

Great job.  The thread is yours.

 

 

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Absolutely correct, starliteyes. The song itself, with lyrics by Mack Gordon and music by Jimmy Van Heusen, is absolutely sublime and the duet by Doris Day and Frank Sinatra is one of the best from any musical film. I always wished they had sung together more than just this once during the movie. Their voices blend so beautifully.  I love this song and I love this movie. It's a film I can watch over and over again.

 

Great job.  The thread is yours.

I agree, Marsha.  I think it's a beautiful song, too, and it's really a shame that they didn't get the opportunity to sing at least one full-fledged duet somewhere during the course of the picture.  I mean, the two of them only sing a few lines together and I guess that we'll just have to be happy that we at least have that.  Oh, well, moving on -

 

This song, which has become a standard, was memorably performed by the stars of a well-known musical film.  However, just a few years before that, it was performed much less memorably by an actress not known for her singing and dancing skills (in fact, she was dubbed) in a much more minor musical that also used its title for the title of the film.

 

Name the song, the 2 films and the 3 performers. 

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Here's one that fits.  In the 1949 film, "Dancing In The Dark", the title song is performed by Betsy Drake, who's singing was dubbed.  In the 1953 film "The Band Wagon", the song is danced to by Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse.  Here is their dance.  Notice her flat shoes.

 

 

 

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Austrian ballerina Tilly Losch introduced the song Dancing in the Dark in the review, The Bandwagon on Broadway in 1931.

 

I'm a fan of Downton Abbey. Downton Abbey is filmed in a place called Highclere Castle in Hampshire England. Since 1679 Highclere has been the home of the Earls of Carnarvon.

 

Tilly Losch was married to the sixth Earl of Carnarvon. You can imagine my shock and thrill of seeing her portrait still in the castle during a BBC documentary.

 

Her husband was the grandfather of the current Earl, who leases his home for the filming of Downton Abbey.

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Yes, Miles, Dancing in the Dark is the answer.  Everyone remembers Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse dancing to that song in The Band Wagon, but who remembers Betsy Drake's "singing" (she was dubbed by Bonnie Lou Williams) and dancing, if indeed that was her dancing since most of it was done in a long shot, of that same song?  I can't help wondering why she was cast in a part that she was so clearly not right for, but then the movie itself was no great shakes either.

 

Your thread, Miles.  

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Yes, why did they sometimes put non-musical performers in starring roles in musicals?  Sometimes it's for the star's name, like Lucy in "Mame".  However, in 1949 Betsy Drake was not a major star.  Fox had Betty Grable and June Haver under contract.  They could have worked loan out deals to get Cyd Charisse or Vera-Ellen.  My guess is that they did it to save money.  Also, in 1949, they made a movie with Cary Grant called "I Was A Male War Bride".  Cary was about to marry Betsy Drake.  It may have been an inducement to get Cary.  

Now, here is one that I posted some time ago, but you may not remember it, and I thought it deserved another appearance.

Here are some lyrics to a well known song:

 

I thought I was happy I could live without love,
Now I must admit, love is all I'm thinking of.
Won't you please be kind, and just make up your mind
That you'll be sweet and gentle, be gentle with me  

 

 

 

You may recognize it as the theme song of a famous musician/ bandleader, however, that famous musician did not appear in this movie.  This was a forties comedy.  It was sung by a woman who would go on to work on Broadway, and years later she would have a recurring role on a popular TV sitcom.  

Can you name the song, the movie I am referring to, and the woman who sang it in the movie?  Bonus points if you can name the TV series that she appeared in.

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OK, here is a big hint:  In the movie, Martha Raye plays twins with very different personalities, which is extremely confusing for the two bumbling stars of the film.

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Thanks for the hint (even though a not-so-big hint would have sufficed).  It's "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You", which was sung by Carol Bruce in Keep 'Em Flying.  She played Arthur Carlson's mother on WKRP in Cincinnati.

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That's right, Azure.  "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" was Tommy Dorsey's theme song.  In the 1941 Abbott and Costello movie, Carol Bruce sings it in a  nightclub scene.  She had been a big band singer with Larry Clinton's orchestra, and she had also appeared on Broadway.  In 1946, she starred as Julie Laverne in the Broadway revival of "Show Boat".  Later, she appeared on some TV soap operas before landing the role of station owner Mama Carlson on WKRP.  The reason that I even thought about this question was because Sylvia Sidney was on TCM this week in "The Fury".  Sylvia Sidney had played Mama Carlson in the pilot film for WKRP, but she was unavailable when the show became a series, so Carol Bruce got the role.  Here is Carol Bruce, both young and old.

 

 MV5BMTUxNDQ4ODE0Ml5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjAy  22191164_119238605077.jpg     

 

You can see her in the movie about nine minutes into this clip:

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xw9kmg_abbot-costello-keep-em-flying-1_shortfilms 

 

If it doesn't open, right click on it then left click on "Open Link In New Window"  

 

Good work, Azure.  It's your turn now.

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Thanks for the video and the additional info, Miles.  Carol Bruce was certainly a great talent. 

 

 

 

Next:  A well-known singer was seriously considered for a role in a film adaptation of a famous musical.  She would have had to perform one of the best-known songs in the whole musical.  However, the role ended up going to a well-known actress (who ended up being dubbed).  Interestingly, the singer performed the same role and sang the same song in a biopic that was made a few years earlier.  However, she only got the chance to appear in one musical number.  (I hope that this isn't confusing.) 

 

Please name:

 

- the song

- the 2 films (the musical and the biopic)

- the singer and the actress

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This isn't confusing at all - - this is obviously a MGM question.

 

Let's start at the beginning.

 

Lena Horne was the performer who did the Julie LaVerne numbers in the Showboat presentation in the MGM biopic about Jerome Kern-- Till clouds roll by.

 

When MGM was ready to make a full-scale movie of Showboat in 1951, they hired their biggest movie star Ava Gardner to play the part of Julie LaVerne.

 

Lena Horne wanted the part. But the role of Julie called for a black woman who could pass, who was a mulatto - - looking just like a white person, which Lena Horne, of course, could not do.

 

Plus Lena had a suitcase of racist issues to deal with.

 

In 1947 she broke the race rule at MGM on interracial relationships by marrying the top music man at the studio Lennie Hayton. Lennie was the conductor- arranger on Singin' in the Rain.

 

During the McCarthy era, Lena was also politically associated with singer/actor Paul Robeson who had been blacklisted. Her association with him also, summarily got her blacklisted too.

 

So she didn't get the part in Showboat and she said that was the reason she quit MGM. But these other factors also played a part.

 

To add insult to injury Ava Gardner had to rehearse with Lena's recordings of the songs from Till clouds roll by to figure out how to lip sync her vocals, which were then being dubed!

 

This time it may be a case where real life racial issues take precedence over the theatrical race issues in the musical production.

 

Lena's song was Can't Help Lovin' That Man of Mine.

 

 

I don't believe that MGM ever seriously considered using Lena Horne in this movie. Because there's no way that she could have had an on- screen relationship with a white man at that time in the movies.

 

For the most part her numbers were placed in the MGM musicals where they could be cut by the southern censors, if necessary.

 

The only time she got to star in a movie and have dialogue lines and a real part as such, was in musicals that were all black-- such as Cabin in the Sky and Stormy Weather.

 

And also as I previously stated she couldn't pass for white.

 

Today an actress like Maya Rudolph would be perfect for the part because she can also sing, her mother was the famous black singer Minnie Riperton.

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To add to the confusion on this subject, Ava Gadner lip-synched to another singer in the movie.  However, when the original soundtrack was released, it was Ava's voice that was heard on the record.  When they released the soundtrack on CD, both versions of the songs can be heard.

 

Terrence.

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Terrence-- Showboat--it's definitely not my cup of tea - - but I've got Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson singing from That's Eentertainment and it's beautiful

 

along with William Warfield's Old Man River.

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