allaboutlana

Do You Know This Song?

2,703 posts in this topic

I think it's Piano Sonata Rondo alla turca by Mozart, played in Wuthering Heights, but not sure of the 41 film...I'm guessing The Great Lie (because Mary Astor is a pianist ) but imdb doesn't list it in soundtrack. When I think of it, I always think of Teddy playing it in Arsenic and Old Lace????

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I think it's Piano Sonata Rondo alla turca by Mozart, played in Wuthering Heights, but not sure of the 41 film...I'm guessing A Stolen Life (because Mary Astor is a pianist ) but imdb doesn't list it in soundtrack. When I think of it, I always think of Teddy playing it in Arsenic and Old Lace

 

You got the song, the composer and the 1939 film correct, Shutoo.  Good job.  Yes, I completely forgot that the song was also featured in Arsenic and Old Lace.  Thanks for mentioning that. 

 

Here's a big hint about the 1941 film -- It was directed by George Cukor.  (He only made 2 films that year.)

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You got the song, the composer and the 1939 film correct, Shutoo. Good job. Yes, I completely forgot that the song was also featured in Arsenic and Old Lace. Thanks for mentioning that.

 

Here's a big hint about the 1941 film -- It was directed by George Cukor. (He only made 2 films that year.)

Azure-- a big hand but you got me at a disadvantage

 

It's been fifty years since I've seen two-faced woman and I've never seen a woman's face. But what I can remember of two-faced woman; it wasn't really a classical music movie. And since a woman's face comes from a European original film with Ingrid Bergman I'm going to go with that--

 

A woman's face--

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Azure-- a big hand but you got me at a disadvantage

 

It's been fifty years since I've seen two-faced woman and I've never seen a woman's face. But what I can remember of two-faced woman; it wasn't really a classical music movie. And since a woman's face comes from a European original film with Ingrid Bergman I'm going to go with that--

 

A woman's face--

 

Yes, it was indeed A Woman's Face.  Good job.  This film was not a classical music movie either, so you made a very lucky guess.  Of course, the star was Joan Crawford. 

 

I appreciate you answering the last question, Princess.  If you don't mind, I'm going to give the thread to Shutoo because she (or he?) correctly identified the song, composer and 1939 film. 

 

The thread is yours, Shutoo. 

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Thanks Azure..

 

A very popular composer wrote this peppy song for a 20's Broadway show..but left it out, and never included it in his later works. Fast forward nearly 50 years..it was used in a 70's comedy, and has been part of several (over 10) film and TV soundtracks since. Interestingly, there have been two biopics based on the composer..only the most recent used this tune.

 

Can you name the song that was 'rediscovered ', the composer, and any of the films it was used in?

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I think the song is "Let's Misbehave", which was written by Cole Porter.  The song was left out of the Broadway musical Paris, but it was later included in the 1962 revival of Anything Goes.  It was sung in the 2004 Cole Porter biopic De-Lovely.  It was featured in 2 Woody Allen films -- Bullets Over Broadway and Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask).  It was also featured in Pennies from Heaven (1981), Johnny Dangerously (1984), and other films. 

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Azure's just too good...reading my original post I realize I left a 'he' out..meant to say he never used it in other productions (sorry)...I actually thought of the song because I recently heard it in Easy Virtue, and it was used in the last remake of The Great Gatsby too.

 

Your thread, Azure!

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Thanks, Shutoo.

 

 ===

 

Next:  Do you recognize these lyrics? 

 

 

It's all too wonderful
I'll never find the words
That say enough, tell enough
I mean they just aren't swell enough

 

 

This song was introduced in a 1930s musical film.  It was prominently featured in a 1940s film noir that was shown not too long ago on TCM.  It was also featured in a film noir that was shown on TCM very recently. 

 

Please name:

 

- the song

- the composer and lyricist

- the 1930s film that the song was introduced in

- the 1940s film noir that it was featured in 

 

Bonus points for naming the film noir that the song was most recently featured in. 

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The song is Too Marvelous for Words, written by Richard Whiting and Johnny Mercer for the film Ready, Willing and Able (1937).  It was also featured prominently as background music in Dark Passage (1947).  However, I will have to forego the bonus points as I must admit that I haven't a clue regarding the most recent film noir it was featured in. 

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The song is Too Marvelous for Words, written by Richard Whiting and Johnny Mercer for the film Ready, Willing and Able (1937).  It was also featured prominently as background music in Dark Passage (1947).  However, I will have to forego the bonus points as I must admit that I haven't a clue regarding the most recent film noir it was featured in. 

 

Correct on all counts.  Great job, Star.  The song was also sung by Jayne Mansfield (who was dubbed) in Illegal, which was shown last night. 

 

The thread is all yours, Star.

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Thanks, Azure.

 

Here is the verse to a song:

 

There was a time when sex appeal

Had the most complex appeal

Mr. Freud then employed

Words we never had heard of

He kept us on a string

We kept on wondering

But the seed of sin

Now at last has been

Found by Elinor Glyn

In one word she defines

The indefinable thing

 

Name the song and who sang it in what film.

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And your guess would be correct,Terrence!  I didn't think that would take too long.  Even if you aren't familiar with the song, I think the verse almost gives the title away and, of course, it helps if one is familiar with Elinor Glyn.  Ann certainly gives a spirited rendition.  Here she is now to do it for you:

 

 

 

Your thread, Terrence. 

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Thanks for that clip, Starlit. Ann Miller seems to really be enjoying that number.  I don't think this was one of Romberg's best known songs, but I'm glad it was included in the movie.

 

Now,  in one movie this song was performed by one of the screen's greatest dancers.  The setting is a beautiful exotic locale.  In another movie, the same song is performed as a duet by two of Hollywood's most talented and popular singers.

 

Name the song, the two movies, the dancer, and the two singers.

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Hint: The  movie with the dancer is a musical biography.  In the movie with the two singers, this is the only movie they made together.  The female singer was borrowed from another studio.

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Just a guess here, Terrence, but could this possibly be from the same movie as It, Deep in My Heart, the biopic of Sigmund Romberg?  Cyd Charisse "sang" (dubbed by Carol Richards) and danced with James Mitchell to One Alone from The Desert Song.  The setting for the number was beautiful and exotic.  I have never seen the 1953 version of The Desert Song starring Gordon MacRae and Kathryn Grayson, but I know it's a Warner Brothers film and Kathryn Grayson was under contract to MGM, so she would have had to have been borrowed from MGM to make the film and I'm pretty certain that she and Gordon MacRae only made one film together.  I'm assuming that somewhere in the course of the movie they sang One Alone.

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Good going, Starlit.  An absolutely perfect answer.  I must have had "Deep in My Heart" on my mind when I posed this question.  If you've never seen "The Desert Song", you can only imagine how beautiful this duet is.  Their two voices blend together so well.  It's yours.

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Thank you, Terrence.

 

In a film that was otherwise a comedy, the onscreen hijinks paused momentarily while the voice of the female star was heard singing a rather lovely ballad.

 

Name the film, the star and the song she sang.

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Starlit, I love your postings.  They are always a challenge to me.  I'm going to try Doris Day singing "Possess Me" from "Pillow Talk".

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Terrence, this is truly a case of apples and oranges.  I was thinking of Should I Surrender from Lover Come Back, but you were definitely on the right track and I happily turn the thread over to you.  

 

If you would like to hear Doris sing it, here she is now:

 

 

 

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Here are lyrics to a song, only the music of which is heard as the theme song in a recently shown movie on TCM:

 

You haven't held me in your arms lately,

You haven't kissed me in the tender way you should.

It's rather obvious you've changed greatly,

But I wouldn't say the change is for the good!

 

Name the song, the movie in which the music is the theme, and name the lyricist and composer.

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I think it's "A Woman's Intuition", which was featured in the recently-shown Payment on Demand.  The song was written by Victor Young (with lyrics by Ned Washington). 

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I think it's "A Woman's Intuition", which was featured in the recently-shown Payment on Demand.  The song was written by Victor Young (with lyrics by Ned Washington). 

Azure, an absolutely perfect answer. (BTW the recording of "A Woman's Intuition" by Lee Wiley is my personal favorite.) The thread is yours.

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