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therealfuster

Your favorite -

25 posts in this topic

director, and why?

 

I have so many, it is hard to pick a favorite.

 

I'll start with Kubrick. He is a favorite because though he does fit that haughty auteur classification, each one of his films seemingly is totally different.

 

I could watch "Clockwork Orange" over and over, and have...always finding new and interesting things. His films have wit, humor, prescience, technical expertise, style, and yet basic human qualities.

 

There is a unifying thread to his work despite the diversity of actors, and content.

 

Up there with him, I might pick Bunuel or Polanski, but I'd like to hear other's choices first.

 

Well?

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I'm with you on Kubrick. I could watch any of his 12 films over and over without getting bored (in fact I have watched them all several times). They're all funny and rich with detail and, with the exception of Spartacus, linked by the same style and themes.

 

I'm not sure I'd call him my favorite though because his films are somewhat sterile. Even though they're endlessly entertaining I'm not usually stirred emotionally.

 

It's a hard question with so many great directors and none of them entirely perfect. If I had to nail it down, I'd say Jacques Rivette is my favorite. To me, his movies are the only ones that are both intellectually exciting with his carefully patterned camera placement and deeply moving. I still get a warm feeling watching "Celine and Julie Go Boating" or "Gang of Four".

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Minnelli, a good director, a man with an eye. He had a long satisfying career I admire his talent. I also like when stars get behind the camera like Gibson(haven't seen Passion) or Kostner or Kirk Douglas. I also like Steven Speilberg I remember one year at the Oscars Johnny Carson was telling who won't win an Oscar and he was listing the reasons and he says if your name is Steven you won't win or be nominated for an Oscar

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I loved John Ford and Frank Capra's films. John Ford, in my opinion, made the best westerns and Frank Capra's movies were so touching and funny.

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Can't believe I forgot Ida Lupino I like her directing and admire her so much she is tops in my book. Then Clint Eastwood with Play Misty For Me his first run out the gate love that movie and The Outlaw Josey Wales and let's don't forget The Unforgiven.

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I like Minnelli and I also like M. Night Shalyman (spelling?)...but this question is intriguing; I've never really thought of it before.

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Fuster: I viddy what you mean about "A Clockwork Orange" and I think that almost all Kubrick films are real horrorshow. I also think "Full Metal Jacket" packs a heck of a wallop right in the old gutty-wutts. I think I'll head on over to the Duke of New york and have some moloko-plus and some vellocet. I 've got a bit of a pain in the old gulliver.

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I've been wanting to see The Informer, and it's in TCM's library. Does anyone know when they last showed it ... or if they will again? I've been requesting it.

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When we had this topic once before I chose the director William Wyler and I'm sticking to my guns.

When he was at the helm you were assured a quality motion picture and who could argue with 12 Oscar nominations for Best Director:

"Dodsworth", "Wuthering Heights", "The Letter", "The Little Foxes", "Mrs. Miniver" (won), "The Best Years of Our Lives" (won), "The Heiress", "Detective Story", "Roman Holiday", "Friendly Persuasion", "Ben-Hur" (won), "The Collector".

Also made "The Good Fairy", "These Three", "Dead End", "Jezebel", "The Westerner", "The Big Country", "The Children's Hour", "Funny Girl" etc.

It's no wonder that Bette Davis considered him the very best.

Runner-up is John Ford.

 

Mongo

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I agree with Mongo, Wyler is one of my very faves. Others are George Stevens, Ernst Lubistch, Frank Capra, Rouben Mamoulian and George Cukor.

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this devotchka is very impressed with your take on the droogie chatspeak.

 

Yes, Kubrick did have a good eye for spotting a brilliant novel and translating it to the screen.

 

Though Nabokov may have been a teensy bit displeased, Kubrick still caught the heart of Lolita and Humbert Humbert on film. The Jeremy Irons' version was true to the book but a bit less entertaining.

 

I'm enjoying reading everyone's picks here for fave directors and thanks all who participated!

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I forgot Lubitsch!

 

Shame on me. He could comprise a category all himself.

 

The Lubitsch touch is not an urban legend. His films really do have something a bit different, in sophistication and continental lightly seasoned humor.

 

I like all your choices for fave directors but Ernst is special!

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I agree with kimbo on John Ford, I grew up watching westerns and his are among my favorites. Other favorites are Akira Kurosawa, Spielberg, and Tarantino.

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I seem to remember Nabokov praising the Kubrick's version of Lolita. He knew a movie would have to be very different and he loved Sue Lyon as Lo--the way she tugged at her shirtsleeves...

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My choice is the almost always overlooked Howard Hawks. His career went from the silents-Road to Glory and The Cradle Snatchers- to the 30's and 40's - Dawn Patrol, Scarface, Twentieth Century, Barbary Coast, Ceiling Zero, Come and Get It, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, and Red River - thru the 50's - The Big Sky, Monkey Business, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Rio Bravo- and onto the 60's -Hatari, Man's Favorite Sport and El Dorado - ending with Rio Lobo on 1970. But I am always amazed at the range of films he made he made from 1938 through 1941 - Bringing Up Baby (1938), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), Sergeant York (1941), And Ball of Fire (1941). The movies he made throughout his career show a range and ability that truly makes him one of the greats.

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I should mention Errol Morris. I'm really impressed by the way he and his interrotron bring new subtext to otherwise mundane stories. Nobody else I know can put people's psyches on display like that.

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David O. Selznick

Alfred Hitchcock

They scare me really good.

Ron Howard

He makes me watch modern flicks.

Clint Eastwood

Who doesn't like Eastwood?

 

 

 

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Holly, nobody is blaming you for anything. It was just to enlighten you regarding the subject.

 

Mongo

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