fxreyman

LISTS

1,563 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!

 

Happy New Year!!

 

Lists. Interesting word, isn't it? Makes you wonder what that all encompasses, heh?

 

Well I have been pondering lists for a very long time. Especially lists about movies. Favorite movies. Favorite actors, actresses, writers, directors, composers. Lists having to do with best movies in your own humble opinion of course! Your top 100 greatest films. Your bottom 100 worst films. Lists that showcase your own movie collections. How many movies do you have in your own collection or library? How many films from one director do you have? How many of your own films are westerns? War films, dramas, historical dramas, comedies, silents and so on.

 

A list could be made up almost about anything. Number of films you have seen in your lifetime. Number of films you have not seen but would like to have seen. Favorite John Wayne films. Favorite F.W. Murnau films. Favorite movie heroes, movie good guys, movie bad guys, movie blondes, movie redheads, etc.

 

Well I think you get the picture.

 

This is a thread idea that I have been thinking about for a long time. I know that some of you out there don't like to make lists. That is okay. You do not have to participate. It's a free message board!

 

A thread has never been started having anything to do with LISTS I think. Oh, maybe the occasional thread has a list in there somewhere, like the Greatest films of all time thread. I know that in the past I have run afoul of some posters who really did not want anything to do with publishing lists of any kind, but there are a few of us here who love to compile lists. FrankGrimes and I have gone back and forth about lists many times. In our opinion, lists are a very good way of finding out about a person's likes and dislikes. List making is a sure way to find out what other people like. What movies, which actors and so on. It is a great place to start talking about their favorite films.

 

I thought it might be interesting and fun to see how many films are in each person's home collection. I know that filmlover has his own forum set up to include Classic Film DVD Reviews and under that he has a thread entitled: Hangin' Around the DVD Water Cooler. This thread was intended to discuss DVDs in a general way less so than actual reviews of DVDs. Under Favorites, a thread was started on January 1st, 2010 by OurGangFanatic about a listing of people's 100 greatest films. A lot of people got involved. That is what I am hoping to do with this thread.

 

Since filmlover's forum is mainly about the releases, reviews and interest levels associated with DVDs, I thought that maybe a thread on the Favorites Forum could be about movie collections, favorite films, actors and so on like I wrote in the first paragraph earlier.

 

I am thinking that any collection from anyone here on the boards could be included. So, what do you all think?

 

Tonight I will include my library for everyone to see. It is going to be a long list, but I don't see a problem with that. You all are welcome to show all of your films as well. So lets get started!!!

 

Message edited by fxreyman (Rey)

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Now I will be honest with you all. If you all feel that compiling a list like this will be too time consuming, well I will leave you to make that determination. You may want to just include certain titles, or just a breakdown of titles you have in your collections from each decade.

 

So then here is my complete list of titles in my personal library. 621 total films. I have indicated which films are vhs. There are 113 vhs titles and 508 dvd titles. A breakdown by decade and a list of directors above 3 films each is included at the end. Enjoy!

 

1. Abe Lincoln in Illinois, John Cromwell 1940

2. About Schmidt, Alexander Payne 2002

3. The Abyss, James Cameron 1989

4. The Accused, Jonathan Kaplan 1988

5. Adam?s Rib, George Cukor 1949

6. The Adventures of Robin Hood, Michael Curtiz 1938

7. Advise and Consent, Otto Preminger 1962

8. The African Queen, John Huston 1951

9. Age of Consent, Michael Powell 1969

10. Air Force One, Wolfgang Petersen 1997

11. The Alamo, John Wayne 1960

12. Alfie, Lewis Gilbert 1966

13. All About Eve, Joseph L. Mankiewicz 1950

14. All I Desire, Douglas Sirk 1953

15. All the President?s Men, Alan J. Pakula 1976

16. All Quiet on the Western Front, Lewis Milestone 1930

17. Almost Famous, Cameron Crowe 2000

18. Altered States, Ken Russell 1980

19. American Gangster, Ridley Scott 2007

20. American Graffiti, George Lucas 1973

21. An American in Paris, Vincente Minnelli 1951

22. The American President, Rob Reiner 1995

23. The Americanization of Emily, Arthur Hiller 1964

24. Angel and the Badman, James Edward Grant 1947

25. Angels With Dirty Faces, Michael Curtiz 1937

26. Annie Hall, Woody Allen vhs 1977

27. The Apartment, Billy Wilder 1960

28. Apollo 13, Ron Howard 1995

29. The Asphalt Jungle, John Huston 1950

30. The Aviator, Martin Scorsese 2004

31. Awakenings, Penny Marshall vhs 1990

32. The Awful Truth, Leo McCarey 1937

33. The Bachelor & the Bobby-Soxer, Irving Reis 1947

34. The Bad and the Beautiful, Vincente Minnelli 1952

35. Bad Day at Black Rock, John Sturges 1955

36. The Ballad of Cable Hogue, Sam Peckinpah 1970

37. Ball of Fire, Howard Hawks vhs 1941

38. The Banger Sisters, Bob Dolman 2002

39. The Barkeleys of Broadway, Charles Walters 1948

40. Batman, Tim Burton vhs 1989

41. Batman Begins, Christopher Nolan 2005

42. Battleground, William Wellman 1949

43. Battle of the Bulge, Ken Annakin 1965

44. A Beautiful Mind, Ron Howard 2001

45. Becket, Peter Glenville vhs 1964

46. The Bedford Incident, James B. Harris 1965

47. Being There, Hal Ashby 1979

48. Ben-Hur, William Wyler 1959

49. The Best Years of Our Lives, William Wyler 1946

50. Between God, the Devil and a Winchester, Marino Girolami 1968

51. Big, Penny Marshall vhs 1988

52. The Big Country, William Wyler 1958

53. The Big Red One, Samuel Fuller 1980

54. The Big Sleep, Howard Hawks 1946

55. Birdman of Alcatraz, John Frankenheimer 1962

56. The Bishop?s Wife, Henry Koster 1947

57. Bite the Bullet, Richard Brooks vhs 1975

58. Blackboard Jungle, Richard Brooks 1950

59. Black Narcissus, M. Powell/E. Pressburger vhs 1947

60. Black Sunday, John Frankenheimer 1977

61. Blazing Saddles, Mel Brooks 1974

62. Blue Steel, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

63. Body and Soul, Robert Rossen vhs 1950

64. Boogie Nights, Paul Thomas Anderson 1999

65. Boot Hill, Giuseppi Colizzi 1969

66. Born to the West, Charles Barton 1937

67. The Bourne Ultimatum, Paul Greengrass 2007

68. Breakfast at Tiffany?s, Blake Edwards 1961

69. Breaking Away, Peter Yates 1979

70. The Bride of Frankenstein, James Whale 1935

71. The Bride Wore Boots, Irving Pichel 1946

72. The Bridge on the River Kwai, David Lean 1957

73. Bringing Up Baby, Howard Hawks 1938

74. Broadcast News, James L. Brooks 1987

75. Broken Lance, Edward Dmytryk vhs 1953

76. A Bronx Tale, Robert De Niro vhs 1988

77. Brubaker, Stuart Rosenberg vhs 1980

78. Buchanan Rides Alone, Budd Boetticher 1958

79. Bullitt, Peter Yates 1968

80. Bulworth, Warren Beatty 1998

81. Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid, George Roy Hill 1969

82. Cabaret, Bob Fosse 1972

83. The Caine Mutiny, Edward Dmytryk 1954

84. Call Northside 777, Henry Hathaway 1948

85. Camille, George Cukor vhs 1936

86. Cape Fear, J. Lee Thompson 1962

87. Capricorn One, Peter Hyams 1978

88. Captain Blood, Michael Curtiz 1935

89. Captains Courageous, Victor Fleming 1937

90. Carrington, Christopher Hampton vhs 1994

91. Casablanca, Michael Curtiz 1942

92. Champion, Mark Robson vhs 1949

93. Charade, Stanley Donen 1963

94. Chariots of Fire, Hugh Hudson 1980

95. Children of a Lesser God, Randa Haines 1986

96. The China Syndrome, James Bridges vhs 1978

97. Chinatown, John Huston 1974

98. Chino, John Sturges, Duillo Coletti 1973

99. Chisum, Andrew V. McLaglen 1970

100. Chocolat, Lasse Hallstrom 1999

101. Christmas in July, Preston Sturges 1940

102. The Cider House Rules, Lasse Hallstrom vhs 1999

103. The Cincinnati Kid, Norman Jewison 1965

104. Citizen Kane, Orson Welles 1941

105. City Lights, Charles Chaplin vhs 1931

106. City Slickers, Ron Underwood vhs 1990

107. Class Action, Michael Apted 1991

108. Clear and Present Danger, Phillip Noyce 1994

109. Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Steven Spielberg 1977

110. Collateral, Michael Mann 2002

111. Comanche Station, Budd Boetticher 1960

112. Comes a Horseman, Alan J. Pakula vhs 1978

113. Coming Home, Hal Ashby 1978

114. The Constant Gardener, Fernando Meirelles 2005

115. Contact, Robert Zemeckis 2001

116. The Conversation, Francis Ford Coppola 1974

117. Cool Hand Luke, Stuart Rosenberg 1967

118. Courage Under Fire, Edward Zwick vhs 1996

119. The Court Jester, Melvin Frank / Norman Panama 1953

120. The Cowboys, Mark Rydell 1972

121. Crash, Paul Haggis 2005

122. Crimes and Misdeamnors, Woody Allen 1986

123. Crocodile Dundee, Peter Faiman 1986

124. Crossfire, Edward Dmytryk 1947

125. The Cruel Sea, Charles Frend vhs 1953

126. Cry Blood Apache, Jack Starrett 1970

127. Dances With Wolves, Kevin Costner 1990

128. Dave, Ivan Reitman vhs 1993

129. David Copperfield, George Cukor 1935

130. The Day of the Jackal, Fred Zinnemann vhs 1973

131. The Day the Earth Stood Still, Robert Wise 1951

132. The Dawn Rider, Robert N. Bradbury 1935

133. Dead Again, Kenneth Branagh 1991

134. Decision at Sundown, Budd Boetticher 1957

135. The Deer Hunter, Michael Cimino 1978

136. Defending Your Life, Albert Brooks 1991

137. Deliverance, John Boorman vhs 1972

138. The Desert Trail, Lewis D. Collins 1935

139. Desperate Journey, Raoul Walsh 1942

140. Destination Tokyo, Delmer Daves 1943

141. The Devils Brigade, Andrew V. McLaglen 1968

142. Dial M for Murder, Alfred Hitchcock 1954

143. The Diary of Anne Frank, George Stevens 1959

144. Die Hard, John McTiernan vhs 1988

145. Dinner at Eight, George Cukor 1933

146. The Dirty Dozen, Robert Aldrich 1967

147. Dirty Harry, Don Siegel 1971

148. The Doctor, Randa Haines vhs 1988

149. Doctor Zhivago, David Lean 1965

150. Dodge City, Michael Curtiz 1940

151. Dog Day Afternoon, Sidney Lumet 1975

152. Donovan?s Reef, John Ford 1963

153. Dr. Strangelove, Stanley Kubrick 1964

154. Double Indemnity, Billy Wilder 1944

155. Edge of Darkness, Lewis Milestone 1943

156. The Electric Horseman, Sidney Pollack 1979

157. El Dorado, Howard Hawks 1967

158. The Elephant Man, David Lynch 1980

159. Elmer Gantry, Richard Brooks 1960

160. The Empire Strikes Back, Irvin Kershner vhs 1980

161. The Enemy Below, Dick Powell 1957

162. Erin Brockovich, Steven Soderbergh 2002

163. Executive Decision, Stuart Baird 1997

164. A Face in the Crowd, Elia Kazan 1957

165. Fail-Safe, Sidney Lumet 1964

166. Fandango, Kevin Reynolds vhs 1986

167. Fantasia, Ben Sharpsteen vhs 1940

168. Fargo, Joel Coen 1996

169. Father of the Bride, Vincente Minnelli 1950

170. A Few Good Men, Rob Reiner 1993

171. Field of Dreams, Phil Alden Robinson vhs 1989

172. Five Easy Pieces, Bob Rafelson 1970

173. The Flight of the Phoenix, Robert Aldrich 1965

174. Follow the Fleet, Mark Sandrich 1933

175. Forbidden Planet, Fred M. Wilcox 1956

176. Foreign Correspondent, Alfred Hitchcock 1940

177. Forrest Gump, Robert Zemeckis 1994

178. Fort Apache, John Ford 1947

179. The Fountainhead, King Vidor 1949

180. The Four Feathers, Zoltan Korda vhs 1939

181. The Four Musketeers, Richard Lester 1974

182. Four Weddings and a Funeral, Mike Newell vhs 1994

183. Frankenstein, James Whale 1931

184. The French Connection, William Friedkin 1971

185. The French Lieutenant?s Woman, Karel Reisz vhs 1977

186. Fried Green Tomatoes, Jon Avnet 1992

187. From Here to Eternity, Fred Zinnemann 1953

188. From the Terrace, Mark Robson 1960

189. The Fugitive, Andrew Davis 1992

190. Full Metal Jacket, Stanley Kubrick vhs 1987

191. The Full Monty, Peter Cattaneo 1999

192. Funny Face, Stanley Donen 1957

193. Fury, Fritz Lang 1936

194. The Game, David Fincher vhs 1997

195. Gardens of Stone, Francis Ford Coppola 1987

196. The Getaway, Sam Peckinpah 1972

197. Get Shorty, Barry Sonnenfeld 1995

198. Gettysburg, Ronald Maxwell 1993

199. Ghost, Jerry Zucker 1990

200. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Joseph L. Mankiewicz 1947

201. Giant, George Stevens 1956

202. Gilda, Charles Vidor 1946

203. Glory, Edward Zwick 1989

204. The Godfather, Francis Ford Coppola vhs 1972

205. The Godfather, Part II, Francis Ford Coppola vhs 1974

206. Going My Way, Leo McCarey 1944

207. Goldfinger, Guy Hamilton 1964

208. Gone With the Wind, Victor Fleming 1939

209. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, Sergio Leone 1966

210. Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Sam Wood 1939

211. The Good Earth, Sidney Franklin 1937

212. Goodfellas, Martin Scorsese 1990

213. Good Night and Good Luck, George Clooney 2004

214. Good Will Hunting, Gus Van Sant 1997

215. The Graduate, Mike Nichols 1967

216. Gran Torino, Clint Eastwood 2008

217. Grand Canyon, Lawrence Kasdan 1991

218. Grand Duel, Giancarlo Santi 1972

219. Grand Hotel, Edmund Goulding 1932

220. The Grapes of Wrath, John Ford 1940

221. Grease, Randal Kleiser 1978

222. The Great Dictator, Charles Chaplin vhs 1940

223. The Great Escape, John Sturges 1963

224. The Great Man's Lady, William Wellman 1942

225. The Great McGinty, Preston Sturges 1940

226. The Great Moment, Preston Sturges 1944

227. The Great Train Robbery, Michael Crichton 1979

228. The Greatest Show on Earth, Cecil B. DeMille 1952

229. The Green Mile, Frank Darabont 1999

230. Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Stanley Kramer 1967

231. Gun Crazy, Joseph H. Lewis 1950

232. The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, John Sturges 1957

233. The Gunfighter, Henry King vhs 1950

234. Gunga Din, George Stevens 1939

235. The Guns of Navarone, J. Lee Thompson 1961

236. Hail the Conquering Hero, Preston Sturges 1944

237. Hatari!, Howard Hawks 1962

238. Heartbreak Ridge, Clint Eastwood 1986

239. Heat, Michael Mann 1995

240. Heaven Can Wait, Warren Beatty / Buck Henry 1978

241. Heist, David Mamet 2001

242. Hellbenders, Sergio Corbucci 1967

243. Here Comes Mr. Jordan, Alexander Hall 1941

244. High Sierra, Raoul Walsh vhs 1941

245. His Girl Friday, Howard Hawks 1940

246. Holiday, George Cukor 1938

247. Hoosiers, David Anspaugh 1986

248. The Hospital, Arthur Hiller 1971

249. Hotel Rwanda, Terry George 2004

250. Howards End, James Ivory 1992

251. How Green Was My Valley, John Ford 1941

252. How the West Was Won, Ford / Hathaway / Marshall 1962

253. Hud, Martin Ritt 1963

254. The Hunt For Red October, John McTiernan 1990

255. The Hurricane, Norman Jewison vhs 1999

256. The Hustler, Robert Rossen 1961

257. I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang, Meryvn LeRoy 1932

258. I Am Sam, Jesse Nelson 1999

259. Ice Station Zebra, John Sturges 1968

260. The Ice Storm, Ang Lee 1997

261. Impromptu, James Lapine vhs 1989

262. In a Lonely Place, Nicholas Ray 1950

263. In Cold Blood, Richard Brooks 1967

264. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Steven Spielberg vhs 1989

265. In Harm?s Way, Otto Preminger 1965

266. Inherit the Wind, Stanley Kramer 1960

267. The Insider, Michael Mann vhs 1999

268. Internes Can't Take Money, Alfred Santell 1937

269. In the Heat of the Night, Norman Jewison 1967

270. In the Line of Fire, Wolfgang Petersen vhs 1993

271. In the Name of the Father, Jim Sheridan vhs 1993

272. Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Don Siegel 1956

273. The Invisible Man, James Whale vhs 1933

274. It Can be Done Amigo, Maurizio Lucidi 1972

275. It Happened One Night, Frank Capra 1934

276. It?s a Wonderful Life, Frank Capra 1946

277. Jarhead, Sam Mendes 2005

278. Jaws, Steven Spielberg 1975

279. Jeremiah Johnson, Sydney Pollack 1972

280. Judgement at Nuremberg, Stanley Kramer 1961

281. Julia, Fred Zinnemann vhs 1977

282. Julius Caesar, Joseph L. Mankiewicz 1953

283. Junior Bonner, Sam Pekinpah 1972

284. Key Largo, John Huston 1947

285. Kid Vengeance, Joseph Manduke 1977

286. King Kong, Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack 1933

287. Klute, Alan J. Pakula vhs 1971

288. The Lady Eve, Preston Sturges 1941

289. The Lady Gambles, Micheal Gordon 1949

290. L.A. Confidential, Curtis Hanson 1997

291. L.A. Story, Mick Jackson 1991

292. Last Chance Harvey, Joel Hopkins 2008

293. The Last Emperor, Bernardo Bertolucci 1986

294. The Last of the Mohicans, Michael Mann 1992

295. Laura, Otto Preminger 1944

296. The Lawless Frontier, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

297. Lawrence of Arabia, David Lean 1962

298. A League of Their Own, Penny Marshall 1994

299. Legal Eagles, Ivan Reitman 1986

300. Legends of the Fall, Edward Zwick 1994

301. Libeled Lady, Jack Conway 1936

302. Life As a House, Irwin Winkler 1993

303. The Life of David Gale, Alan Parker vhs 1999

304. Lilies of the Field, Ralph Nelson 1963

305. Limelight, Charles Chaplin vhs 1952

306. The Limey, Steven Soderbergh 1999

307. The Lion in Winter, Anthony Harvey 1968

308. Little Big Man, Arthur Penn 1970

309. Local Hero, Bill Forsyth 1983

310. Lonely Are the Brave, David Miller vhs 1962

311. Lone Star, John Sayles 1996

312. Long Days of Hate, Gianfranco Baldanello 1968

313. The Long Good Friday, John Mackenzie vhs 1980

314. The Long Voyage Home, John Ford 1940

315. The Longest Day, Annakin / Marton / Wicki / Oswald 1962

316. The Longest Yard, Robert Aldrich 1974

317. Lost Horizon, Frank Capra 1937

318. Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola 2003

319. The Lost Weekend, Billy Wilder 1945

320. Love Actually, Richard Curtis 2004

321. The Lucky Texan, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

322. Lust for Life, Vincente Minnelli vhs 1952

323. Madigan, Don Siegel 1967

324. The Magnificent Seven, John Sturges 1960

325. The Maltese Falcon, John Huston 1941

326. The Manchurian Candidate, John Frankenheimer 1962

327. A Man For All Seasons, Fred Zinnemann 1966

328. The Man From Laramie, Anthony Mann 1955

329. The Man From Utah, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

330. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, John Ford 1962

331. The Man Who Would Be King, John Huston vhs 1975

332. Marie Antoinette, W. S. Van Dyke 1938

333. The Mask of Zorro, Martin Campbell vhs 1998

334. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Peter Weir 2003

335. A Matter of Life and Death, Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger 1946

336. McLintock!, Andrew V. McLaglen 1963

337. Meet the Fockers, Jay Roach 2004

338. Michael Clayton, Tony Gilroy 2007

339. Midnight Run, Martin Brest 1988

340. Million Dollar Baby, Clint Eastwood 2003

341. The Miracle of Morgan?s Creek, Preston Sturges vhs 1944

342. The Miracle Worker, Arthur Penn 1962

343. Missing, Costa-Gavras 1982

344. Mississippi Burning, Alan Parker 1988

345. Mister Roberts, John Ford / Mervyn LeRoy vhs 1955

346. Modern Times, Charles Chaplin vhs 1936

347. Moulin Rouge, Baz Luhrmann 2001

348. Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, H.C. Potter 1948

349. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Frank Capra 1936

350. Mr. Holland?s Opus, Stephen Herek vhs 1995

351. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Frank Capra 1939

352. Much Ado About Nothing, Kenneth Branagh 1993

353. The Mummy, Karl Freund 1932

354. The Mummy's Curse, Leslie Goodwins 1944

355. The Mummy's Ghost, Reginald Le Borg 1944

356. The Mummy's Hand, Christy Cabanne 1940

357. The Mummy's Tomb, Harold Young 1942

358. Murder, My Sweet, Edward Dmytryk 1944

359. The Music Man, Morton DaCosta 1962

360. Mutiny on the Bounty, Frank Lloyd 1935

361. My Darling Clementine, John Ford 1946

362. My Fair Lady, George Cukor 1964

363. My Favorite Wife, Garsin Kanin 1940

364. My Life, Bruce Joel Rubin 1993

365. My Man Godfrey, Gregory LaCava 1936

366. My Outlaw Brother, Elliot Nugent 1951

367. Mystic River, Clint Eastwood 2003

368. The Naked Gun, David Zucker 1988

369. The Naked Spur, Anthony Mann vhs 1953

370. The Natural, Barry Levinson 1984

371. 'Neath Arizona Skies, Harry L. Fraser 1934

372. The Negotiator, F. Gary Gray 1998

373. Network, Sidney Lumet 1976

374. Never So Few, John Sturges 1963

375. New Moon, Robert Z. Leonard vhs 1940

376. Night and Day, Michael Curtiz 1946

377. The Night of the Hunter, Charles Laughton 1955

378. A Night to Remember, Roy Baker vhs 1953

379. Ninotchka, Ernst Lubitsch vhs 1939

380. Nixon, Oliver Stone vhs 1995

381. Norma Rae, Martin Ritt 1979

382. North By Northwest, Alfred Hitchcock 1959

383. Northern Pursuit, Raoul Walsh 1943

384. Nothing in Common, Garry Marshall 1986

385. Notorious, Alfred Hitchcock 1946

386. Notting Hill, Roger Michell vhs 2000

387. Objective, Burma!, Raoul Walsh 1945

388. Oklahoma!, Fred Zinnemann 1955

389. Once Upon a Time in the West, Sergio Leone 1969

390. Only Angels Have Wings, Howard Hawks 1939

391. On the Waterfront, Elia Kazan 1954

392. Open Range, Kevin Costner 2003

393. Ordinary People, Robert Redford 1980

394. The Outlaw Josey Wales, Clint Eastwood 1976

395. Out of Africa, Sydney Pollack 1985

396. Out of the Past, Jacques Tourneur 1947

397. The Ox-Bow Incident, William Wellman 1943

398. The Palm Beach Story, Preston Sturges 1940

399. The Paper Chase, James Bridges vhs 1972

400. Papillon, Franklin J. Schaffner 1973

401. Paradise Canyon, Carl Pierson 1935

402. Passion Fish, John Sayles vhs 1992

403. Pat and Mike, George Cukor 1952

404. Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Sam Peckinpah 1973

405. Paths of Glory, Stanley Kubrick 1957

406. Patton, Franklin J. Schaffner 1970

407. A Perfect World, Clint Eastwood 1993

408. Philadelphia, Jonathon Demme 1993

409. The Philadelphia Story, George Cukor 1940

410. The Pianist, Roman Polanski 2002

411. Pirates of the Caribbean, Gore Verbinski 2001

412. The Player, Robert Altman vhs 1992

413. Pleasantville, Gary Ross vhs 1998

414. The Poseidon Adventure, Ronald Neame 1972

415. The Postman Always Rings Twice, Tay Garnett 1946

416. Power, Sidney Lumet 1986

417. The Presido, Peter Hyams 1988

418. Presumed Innocent, Alan J. Pakula 1990

419. Pretty Woman, Gary Marshall vhs 1990

420. Pride and Prejudice, Robert Z. Leonard 1940

421. The Pride of the Yankees, Sam Wood vhs 1942

422. Primal Fear, Gregory Hoblit 1996

423. Primary Colors, Mike Nichols 1998

424. The Prisoner of Zenda, John Cromwell vhs 1937

425. The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Micheal Curtiz 1941

426. Prizzi?s Honor, John Huston vhs 1985

427. The Professionals, Richard Brooks 1966

428. Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock 1960

429. Pulp Fiction, Quentin Tarantino 1994

430. Queen Christina, Rouben Mamoulian vhs 1933

431. The Quiet Man, John Ford 1952

432. Quiz Show, Robert Redford vhs 1992

433. Rage at Dawn, Tim Whelan 1955

434. Raging Bull, Martin Scorsese vhs 1980

435. Raiders of the Lost Ark, Steven Spielberg 1981

436. Rainbow Valley, Robert N. Bradbury 1935

437. Random Harvest, Mervyn LeRoy 1942

438. Randy Rides Alone, Harry L. Fraser 1934

439. Rear Window, Alfred Hitchcock 1954

440. Rebel Without a Cause, Nicholas Ray 1955

441. Red River, Howard Hawks 1948

442. The Remains of the Day, James Ivory 1993

443. Reservoir Dogs, Quentin Tarentino 1992

444. The Return of the Jedi, Richard Marquand vhs 1983

445. Ride Lonesome, Budd Boetticher 1959

446. Riders of Destiny, Robert N. Bradbury 1933

447. Ride the High Country, Sam Peckinpah 1962

448. The Right Stuff, Philip Kaufman 1983

449. Rio Bravo, Howard Hawks 1959

450. Rio Grande, John Ford 1950

451. Rio Hondo, Jose Briz Mendez 1968

452. A River Runs Through It, Robert Redford 1992

453. Robin and Marion, Richard Lester vhs 1976

454. The Rocketeer, Joe Johnston vhs 1989

455. Rocky, John G. Avildsen 1976

456. Roman Holiday, William Wyler 1953

457. Ronin, John Frankenheimer 1998

458. Sabrina, Billy Wilder 1954

459. Sabrina, Sydney Pollack vhs 1995

460. Sagebrush Trail, Armand Schaffer 1933

461. Sahara, Zoltan Korda 1943

462. Sands of Iwo Jima, Allan Dwan 1949

463. The Sand Pebbles, Robert Wise 1966

464. Saturday Night Fever, John Badham 1977

465. Saving Private Ryan, Steven Spielberg 1998

466. Scarface, Howard Hawks, Richard Rosson 1932

467. Schindler?s List, Steven Spielberg 1993

468. Seabiscuit, Gary Ross 2001

469. The Sea Hawk, Michael Curtiz 1940

470. The Searchers, John Ford 1956

471. Secondhand Lions, Tim McCanlies 2003

472. Sense and Sensibility, Ang Lee vhs 1995

473. Sergeant York, Howard Hawks 1941

474. Serpico, Sidney Lumet 1973

475. The Set-Up, Robert Wise 1949

476. Seven Days in May, John Frankenheimer 1964

477. 1776, Peter H. Hunt 1972

478. Shadow of a Doubt, Alfred Hitchcock 1942

479. Shadowlands, Richard Attenborough 1993

480. Shakespeare in Love, John Madden vhs 1998

481. Shall We Dance, Mark Sandrich 1937

482. The Shawshank Redemption, Frank Darabont vhs 1994

483. She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, John Ford 1949

484. The Shootist, Don Siegel 1976

485. The Shop Around the Corner, Ernst Lubitsch 1940

486. A Shot in the Dark, Blake Edwards vhs 1964

487. Shrek, Adamson / Jenson 2001

488. Shrek 2, Adamson / Asbury / Vernon 2004

489. Sideways, Alexander Payne 2002

490. The Silence of the Lambs, Jonathan Demme 1991

491. Singin? in the Rain, Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly 1952

492. Sink the Bismarck!, Lewis Gilbert 1960

493. Sneakers, Phil Alden Robinson 1992

494. Some Like It Hot, Billy Wilder 1959

495. Song of Arizona, Frank McDonald 1946

496. Sophie?s Choice, Alan J. Pakula 1982

497. So Proudly We Hail, Mark Sandrich 1943

498. The Sound of Music, Robert Wise 1965

499. Sounder, Martin Ritt vhs 1972

500. South Pacific, Joshua Logan 1958

501. Spartacus, Stanley Kubrick 1960

502. Speed, Jan de Bont 1994

503. Spellbound, Alfred Hitchcock 1945

504. Spider-Man, Sam Raimi 2001

505. Spider-Man 2, Sam Raimi 2004

506. The Spirit of St. Louis, Billy Wilder vhs 1957

507. The Spy Who Came In From the Cold, Martin Ritt 1965

508. Stagecoach, John Ford 1939

509. Stage Door, Gregory La Cava 1937

510. Stalag 17, Billy Wilder 1953

511. A Star is Born, George Cukor 1954

512. Starman, John Carpenter 1984

513. The Star Packer, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

514. Starting Over, Alan J. Pakula 1979

515. Star Trek, J.J. Abrams 2009

516. Star Trek The Motion Picture, Robert Wise 1979

517. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Nicholas Meyer 1982

518. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Leonard Nimoy 1984

519. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, Leonard Nimoy 1986

520. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, William Shatner 1989

521. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, Nicholas Meyer 1991

522. Star Trek Generations, David Carson vhs 1994

523. Star Trek First Contact, Jonathan Frakes vhs 1996

524. Star Trek Insurrection, Jonathan Frakes vhs 1998

525. Star Trek Nemesis, Stuart Baird vhs 2002

526. Star Wars, George Lucas vhs 1977

527. State of the Union, Frank Capra vhs 1948

528. The Sting, George Roy Hill vhs 1973

529. Strangers on a Train, Alfred Hitchcock vhs 1951

530. The Stunt Man, Richard Rush vhs 1980

531. The Sundowners, Fred Zinnemann vhs 1960

532. Sullivan?s Travels, Preston Sturges 1940

533. The Sundowners, George Templeton 1950

534. Sunset Boulevard, Billy Wilder 1951

535. Superman: The Movie, Richard Donner 1978

536. Support Your Local Sheriff!, Burt Kennedy 1969

537. Suspicion, Alfred Hitchcock vhs 1941

538. Swing Time, George Stevens 1936

539. Switchback, Jeb Stuart 1997

540. The Taking of Pelham 1, 2, 3, Joseph Sargent 1973

541. A Tale of Two Cities, Jack Conway 1935

542. The Tall Guy, Mel Smith vhs 1989

543. The Tall T, Budd Boetticher 1957

544. The Talk of the Town, George Stevens 1942

545. 10, Blake Edwards 1979

546. The Ten Commandments, Cecil B. DeMille 1956

547. The Terminator, James Cameron 1984

548. Terminator 2: Judgement Day, James Cameron 1991

549. Terms of Endearment, James L. Brooks 1982

550. Texas Terror, Robert N. Bradbury 1935

551. There's Always Tomorrow, Douglas Sirk 1956

552. They Died With Their Boots On 1942

553. They Were Expendable, John Ford 1945

554. The Thin Man, W.S. Van Dyke 1934

555. The Thing From Another World, Christian Nyby 1951

556. The Third Man, Carol Reed vhs 1950

557. Thirteen Days, Roger Donaldson 2000

558. Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Mervyn LeRoy 1944

559. The Thomas Crown Affair, Norman Jewison 1968

560. Three Days of the Condor, Sydney Pollack 1975

561. 3 Godfathers, John Ford 1948

562. The Three Musketeers, Richard Lester 1973

563. A Time to Kill, Joel Schumacher 1996

564. Titanic, James Cameron vhs 1997

565. To Be or Not to Be, Ernst Lubitsch 1942

566. To Have or Have Not, Howard Hawks vhs 1944

567. To Kill a Mockingbird, Robert Mulligan 1962

568. To the Last Man, Henry Hathaway 1933

569. Tom Horn, William Wiard 1979

570. Top Gun, Tony Scott vhs 1986

571. Top Hat, Mark Snadrich 1935

572. Tootsie, Sydney Pollack vhs 1982

573. Tora! Tora! Tora!, Fleischer / Fukasadu / Masuda 1970

574. Touch of Evil, Orson Welles 1958

575. The Trail Beyond, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

576. The Train, John Frankenheimer 1965

577. Treasure Island, Victor Fleming 1934

578. Treasure of the Sierra Madre, John Huston 1948

579. True Grit, Henry Hathaway 1969

580. True Lies, James Cameron vhs 1994

581. Twelve Angry Men, Sidney Lumet 1957

582. Twelve O?Clock High, Henry King 1949

583. 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick 1968

584. 2010, Peter Hyams 1984

585. Two Weeks Notice, Marc Lawrence 2003

586. Uncertain Glory, Raoul Walsh 1944

587. Under Siege, Andrew Davis 1992

588. Union Pacific, Cecil B. DeMille vhs 1939

589. The Untouchables, Brian De Palma 1986

590. The Verdict, Sidney Lumet 1982

591. Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock 1958

592. Victor/Victoria, Blake Edwards 1982

593. Wag the Dog, Barry Levinson 1997

594. A Walk in the Sun, Lewis Milestone 1945

595. Walk the Line, James Mangold 2005

596. West of the Divide, Robert N. Bradbury 1934

597. West Side Story, Robert Wise vhs 1961

598. Where Eagles Dare, Brian G. Hutton 1969

599. White Christmas, Michael Curtiz 1954

600. White Heat, Raoul Walsh 1949

601. Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Robert Zemeckis vhs 1988

602. Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, Ted Kotcheff vhs 1977

603. Who?s Affraid of Virginia Woolfe?, Mike Nichols vhs 1966

604. The Wild Bunch, Sam Peckinpah 1969

605. Will Penny, Tom Gries 1968

606. Winchester ?73, Anthony Mann 1950

607. The Wind and the Lion, John Milius 1975

608. Winds of the Wasteland, Mack V. Wright 1936

609. The Wings of Eagles, John Ford 1957

610. Witness, Peter Weir vhs 1985

611. Witness For the Prosecution, Billy Wilder vhs 1957

612. The Wizard of Oz, Victor Fleming 1939

613. Woman of the Year, George Stevens 1942

614. The Women, George Cukor 1939

615. Wonder Boys, Curtis Hanson 2000

616. The World's Fastest Indian, Roger Donaldson 2005

617. Wyatt Earp, Lawrence Kasdan 1994

618. Yankee Doodle Dandy, Michael Curtiz 1942

619. Young Frankenstein, Mel Brooks vhs 1974

620. You?ve Got Mail, Nora Ephron 1998

621. Zulu, Cy Endfield 1964

 

The breakdown of the above 621 movies by decade looks like this:

 

1940's: 101

1990's: 95

1960's: 88

1950's: 79

1970's: 78

1930s: 71

1980's: 64

2000's: 45

 

Directors from my collection of films ( DVD / VHS ) with the most movies:

Not including directors with less than 2 credits.

 

17 John Ford

12 Howard Hawks

11 Robert N. Bradbury

11 Alfred Hitchcock

10 George Cukor

10 Michael Curtiz

9 Billy Wilder

8 John Huston

8 Preston Sturgess

7 Sidney Lumet

7 John Sturgis

6 Frank Capra

6 Clint Eastwood

6 John Frankenheimer

6 Alan J. Pakula

6 Sam Peckinpah

6 Sydney Pollack

6 Steven Spielberg

6 George Stevens

6 Robert Wise

6 Fred Zinnemann

5 Budd Boetticher

5 Richard Brooks

5 James Cameron

5 Stanley Kubrick

5 Raoul Walsh

4 Charles Chaplin

4 Frances Ford Coppola

4 Edward Dmytryk

4 Blake Edwards

4 Victor Fleming

4 Henry Hathaway

4 Norman Jewison

4 Mervyn LeRoy

4 Michael Mann

4 Vincente Minnelli

4 Martin Ritt

4 Mark Sandrich

4 Don Siegel

4 William Wyler

3 Robert Aldrich

3 Cecil B. DeMille

3 Stanley Donen

3 Peter Hyams

3 Stanley Kramer

3 David Lean

3 Richard Lester

3 Ernst Lubitsch

3 Joseph L. Mankiewicz

3 Anthony Mann

3 Penny Marshall

3 Andrew V. McLaglen

3 Lewis Milestone

3 Mike Nichols

3 Otto Preminger

3 Robert Redford

3 Martin Scorsese

3 William Wellman

3 James Whale

3 Edward Zwick

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Favorite submarine films:

 

1. The Enemy Below 1957

2. The Hunt for Red October 1990

3. Destination Tokyo 1943

4. Ice Station Zebra 1968

5. The Bedford Incident 1965

6. Fantastic Voyage 1966

7. Torpedo Run 1958

8. Submarine Command 1951

9. On the Beach 1959

10. Das Boot 1981

11. Run Silent, Run Deep 1958

12. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea 1961

13. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea 1954

14. Crash Dive 1943

15. We Dive at Dawn 1943

16. Operation Pacific 1951

17. Operation Petticoat 1959

18. Gray Lady Down 1978

19. The Abyss 1989

20. Crimson Tide 1995

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Hey there, Rey -- I'm glad you started this thread. As you know, I'm definitely a "lists" guy. And I definitely believe lists can tell you something about a person. I also find them to be valuable when attempting to learn something new.

 

For example, when I first got into westerns, I checked out as many westerns lists on "Listmania!" at Amazon. I wanted to know what others felt were the best westerns, or at least their favorites. This helped me to get started. With film noir, I have been using the top 250 films noir at They Shoot Pictures.

 

I looked over your list of movies and I have 183 of those on DVD. I have 895 films on DVD. I'd love to get to 1000 by the end of the year, but that may be pushing it. I also have 91 television box sets, if I include the Three Stooges.

 

My DVDs by decade:

 

1940s - 286

1950s - 247

1930s - 182

1960s - 82

1980s - 28

1920s - 27

1970s - 25

1910s - 10

1990s - 6

2000s - 2

 

As you can see, nearly 60% of my collection is in the 40s and 50s and nearly 80% is from the 30s, 40s, and 50s.

 

The directors I have on DVD:

 

Alfred Hitchcock - 51

John Ford - 47

Henry Hathaway - 19

Anthony Mann - 19

Howard Hawks - 18

Fritz Lang - 18

Ernst Lubitsch - 15

William Wyler - 14

Robert North Bradbury - 13

Joseph L. Mankiewicz - 12

Otto Preminger - 12

Henry King - 11

Mervyn LeRoy - 9

Robert Wise - 9

Frank Capra - 8

Preston Sturges - 8

Raoul Walsh - 8

Budd Boetticher - 7

Blake Edwards - 7

John Huston - 7

F.W. Murnau - 7

Josef von Sternberg - 7

Jacques Tourneur - 7

William A. Wellman - 7

John Cromwell - 6

George Cukor - 6

Edward Dmytryk - 6

Samuel Fuller - 6

Edmund Goulding - 6

Elia Kazan - 6

Arthur Lubin - 6

Mark Robson - 6

Vincent Sherman - 6

Fred Zinnemann - 6

Michael Curtiz - 5

Delmer Daves - 5

Louis Feuillade - 5

Richard Fleischer - 5

Tay Garnett - 5

Phil Karlson - 5

William Keighley - 5

Erle C. Kenton - 5

Stanley Kubrick - 5

Anatole Litvak - 5

Jean Negulesco - 5

Richard Quine - 5

Don Siegel - 5

George Stevens - 5

John Sturges - 5

James Whale - 5

Billy Wilder - 5

Robert Aldrich - 4

Charles Barton - 4

John Brahm - 4

Richard Brooks - 4

Henri-Georges Clouzot - 4

Stanley Donen - 4

Allan Dwan - 4

John Farrow - 4

Stuart Heisler - 4

Charles Lamont - 4

Sergio Leone - 4

Rouben Mamoulian - 4

Leo McCarey - 4

Andrew V. McLaglen - 4

Lewis Milestone - 4

Vincente Minnelli - 4

Nicholas Ray - 4

W.S. Van Dyke II - 4

Charles Vidor - 4

Sam Wood - 4

Jack Arnold - 3

Lloyd Bacon - 3

Curtis Bernhardt - 3

Tod Browning - 3

Jules Dassin - 3

Cecil B. DeMille - 3

Andre de Toth - 3

Henry Koster - 3

Stanley Kramer - 3

Lew Landers - 3

Rowland V. Lee - 3

Delbert Mann - 3

Hal Needham - 3

Roy William Neill - 3

Irving Rapper - 3

Martin Ritt - 3

George Sidney - 3

Robert Siodmak - 3

Douglas Sirk - 3

Edgar G. Ulmer - 3

King Vidor - 3

David Zucker - 3

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47 Ford films. Amazing. And I get the sense you are not all that fond of him.

 

I don't have near as many as either of you. Part of me thinks I'll never be able to watch them and another part thinks that at 40 cents a disc I ought to record everything. I think I did figure, based on another of your lists, that about 25% of my films are westerns.

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Hey Frankie......

 

Wow! You are up early I see. You really are a night owl aren't you?

I knew that you like to get involved in the wee hours of the day, but really don't you ever sleep?

 

Cool list of yours. It's interesting that almost all of your films are from before 1960. And I know that you are a really big film noir fan. Having said that what other genres are you really interested in?

 

I would be really surprised if more people do get involved with this list thread. I hope so. That was my goal here. I am always interested in knowing what everyone else likes, what types of films they lie and so on. I wonder if our lady friends-posters will post as well? I sure hope so.

 

I will be breaking down my 621 list into genres later today. Hopefully that will give you (and me) a better understanding of what I really like.

 

And eventually break my list into a actors/actresses sub-list.

 

Man I could go on and one here. Especially now that I am out of work. Who knows I may even be able to get to the magical 1,000 posts number here!

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47 Ford films. Amazing. And I get the sense you are not all that fond of him.

 

:D Hi, Movieman. He's #11 on my favorite director list. I think Ford is the most emotional of all directors. Well, at least of those I've watched.

 

Since I'm on the newer side of watching classic film, I've attempted to broaden my horizons. I've bought many DVDs that are nothing but new experiences for me. The vast majority of DVDs that I buy, I have never seen the movie before.

 

I don't have near as many as either of you. Part of me thinks I'll never be able to watch them and another part thinks that at 40 cents a disc I ought to record everything.

 

I know what you mean about not watching them. I haven't watched 477 of the films I have on DVD. That's why, when we discuss movies on the board, I actually prefer to do so with ones I've never seen versus ones I've seen. I also like seeing something new.

 

I think I did figure, based on another of your lists, that about 25% of my films are westerns.

 

That makes sense. It's your favorite genre. About 14% of my collection is westerns. I'd say it's my second favorite genre.

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Hi, Rey -- Wow! You are up early I see. You really are a night owl aren't you? I knew that you like to get involved in the wee hours of the day, but really don't you ever sleep?

 

Of course I don't sleep! I'm the undead. I'm definitely a late owl. I always have been. My mom's side of the family are the early-risers and my dad's side are the late-risers. I favor my dad's side... greatly.

 

It's interesting that almost all of your films are from before 1960.

 

I'm now into classic film. I'll eventually buy some more films from my childhood and Coen flicks. But, for now, I'm all about classic film.

 

And I know that you are a really big film noir fan.

 

Yes, it's easily my favorite genre. I have 180 films noir on DVD.

 

Having said that what other genres are you really interested in?

 

1. Film noir

2. Mystery/Suspense/Thriller (Hitchcock, mainly)

3. Westerns

4. Drama (straight drama versus drama within film noir, westerns)

5. Horror

6. Action/Adventure

7. Comedy

8. Science Fiction

9. War

10. Musicals

 

My least favorite kind of films are Victorian period pieces. I do not like "manners" and the like. British stuff doesn't wear well with me. I'm not crazy about epics. I don't like films with dancing and singing, particularly dancing. Well, unless it's breakdancing.

 

I would be really surprised if more people do get involved with this list thread. I hope so. That was my goal here. I am always interested in knowing what everyone else likes, what types of films they lie and so on.

 

It depends on the person and their personality, really. You will see.

 

I wonder if our lady friends-posters will post as well? I sure hope so.

 

That will depend on the lists and what discussion blossoms from them. DVDs? Only one of the ladies you speak of is interested in that.

 

I will be breaking down my 621 list into genres later today. Hopefully that will give you (and me) a better understanding of what I really like.

 

You're 60/40 with post-60s to pre-60s. I'm 84-16 the other way. I don't believe you have a silent film.

 

In terms of genre, I've always viewed you as a westerns/war guy. That's very "guy," to be sure. Movieman is similar. Although, Movieman also likes classic comedies.

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Hey there!

 

Well as I wrote earlier I am going through my 621 list now and figuring out which genre each film belongs to. Surprisingly I am finding that I have a lot of romantic-comedies and straight dramas. I am only into the G's right now. Probably will take a little longer, maybe into tomorrow before I am done.

 

We are going to a house warming party this afternoon, so my list making is going to be interrupted.

 

> I'm now into classic film. I'll eventually buy some more films from my childhood and Coen flicks. But, for now, I'm all about classic film.

 

It's great to see how well you have transitioned to a "classic film" fan. That is impressive. With the recent holiday purchases that I make each year my collection now has more 1940s films than my collection of 1990s films.

 

The one thing I have started to concentrate on is not trying to purchase a one to one replacement of my vhs films. Mainly because most of them are more expensive in DVD form than other films that I like and would rather own. As long as I have at least one vcr I am okay with keeping some of my vhs tapes around.

 

And because of my recent layoff, I will probably not make any more purchases until I am employed again. Although one of my purchases in December was the Universal Barbara Stanwyck Collection. Six films: Internes Can't Take Money, The Great Man's Lady, The Bride Wore Boots, The Lady Gambles, All I desire and There's Always Tomorrow. Stanwyck is my favorite leading lady from the 30's to the 50's, although I'd have to say that Jean Arthur is pretty close.

 

> You're 60/40 with post-60s to pre-60s. I'm 84-16 the other way. I don't believe you have a silent film.

>

 

You are right! 60/40. Most of my early purchases were from the eighties and nineties. Although quite a few were older westerns and war films. I do have two silents on vhs, City Lights and Modern Times, both pseudo silents, or possibly considered crossovers between silents and talkies.

 

> In terms of genre, I've always viewed you as a westerns/war guy. That's very "guy," to be sure. Movieman is similar. Although, Movieman also likes classic comedies.

 

Yes, based on everything I own, I would say your analysis was correct. But, until I see what all the genres are in my list, only then will I know for sure.

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rey,

 

Wow! that is some list. So much work you put into it!!!

 

At this point in time, I would seriously dread having to list all the films in my collection. I did once and put that in some Excel-like document but don't have that on my new computer.

 

Great job!

 

p.s. -- I hope you get work soon.

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>Since I'm on the newer side of watching classic film, I've attempted to broaden my horizons. I've bought many DVDs that are nothing but new experiences for me. The vast majority of DVDs that I buy, I have never seen the movie before.

 

It is amazing to think that you are on the "newer" side. I've learned plenty from you. It makes me think for a lot of years I wasn't paying very close attention.

 

Buying DVDs I've never seen is out of my comfort zone. I always wonder how much I like it and how many times am I likely to watch it before I am comfortable enough to plunk down $10 or $20.'

 

I also like reading some of the rambles before I watch something. I don't want to read too much lest it give me a preconceived notion of things but I like to get a sense of what everyone likes and a few things to look for.

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Hey there, MusicMan -- It is amazing to think that you are on the "newer" side. I've learned plenty from you.

 

Thank you. That was very kind of you to say. I've learned a heckuva lot from many different people on this board. But here's the key, you have to be willing to expose yourself to it. This is quite rare in today's world. Most people only see things in their own way. You are not one of these people. You are one who listens and one who is willing to meet people in their world. It's rarely about you, which is one of the many qualities I admire about you.

 

It makes me think for a lot of years I wasn't paying very close attention.

 

I've come to watch films differently because of the board. I was nowhere near the kind of film watcher I am today prior to this board, so I know what you speak of.

 

Buying DVDs I've never seen is out of my comfort zone. I always wonder how much I like it and how many times am I likely to watch it before I am comfortable enough to plunk down $10 or $20.

 

That's the prevailing thought with most people. What I've learned about myself is that I can find something to like in most classic movies. Sure, I've got my own comfort zone, but I still can enjoy films that are outside of this.

 

My personality is showing with DVDs. I'm one who likes to collect and I like ownership. I'm also single, so I can be foolish.

 

I also like reading some of the rambles before I watch something. I don't want to read too much lest it give me a preconceived notion of things but I like to get a sense of what everyone likes and a few things to look for.

 

I don't like knowing much about a movie before I watch it. I usually don't read a discussion about a film I've never seen.

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Hi, Reyman -- The one thing I have started to concentrate on is not trying to purchase a one to one replacement of my vhs films. Mainly because most of them are more expensive in DVD form than other films that I like and would rather own. As long as I have at least one vcr I am okay with keeping some of my vhs tapes around.

 

I prefer to have a movie on DVD versus tape but I do have to make decisions with that. I've got just over 1300 classic films that I've recorded off of TCM. The vast majority of those films don't interest me in the world of DVD. I just have them in case I wish to watch them at some point.

 

Stanwyck is my favorite leading lady from the 30's to the 50's, although I'd have to say that Jean Arthur is pretty close.

 

I like both of them, as well. I don't have the new Stanwyck box set, but I have the older one.

 

Yes, based on everything I own, I would say your analysis was correct. But, until I see what all the genres are in my list, only then will I know for sure.

 

Of my 100 favorite classic films, the breakdown would be:

 

Film Noir - 28

Drama - 21

Westerns - 14

Mystery/Suspense/Thriller - 13

Horror - 9

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Supernatural - 5

Comedy - 5

Action/Adventure - 5

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Hi Rey!

 

Great idea for a thread.

 

I wish I could post a list of what I have on DVD/DVD-R, but alas, after working four hours on such a list a few months ago, I stupidly failed to save it correctly and LOST all that effort. It was so aggravating to put together that I have not had the patience to do it over again, yet. Once I get it together, I'll post that list here.

 

So, the only lists I can contribute right now are the subjective ones, about my preferences.

 

I'll start with the easiest:

 

Favorite Actors:

 

1. Gary Cooper

2. Clark Gable

3. Spencer Tracy

4. Will Rogers

5. Robert Ryan

6. John Wayne

7. Robert Montgomery

9. Robert Mitchum

10. Frank Sinatra

11. Yul Brynner

12. James Stewart

13. Humphrey Bogart

14. Henry Fonda

15. Rod Taylor

16. John Barrymore

17. Alan Ladd

18. Gilbert Roland

19. William Powell

20. Sterling Hayden

21. Harry Carey, Sr.

22. Brian Keith

22. Tom Santschi

23. Errol Flynn

24. Richard Burton

25. Cary Grant

26. Victor McLaglen

27. Sean Connery

28. Charles Boyer

29. Glenn Ford

30. George Sanders

31. Gregory Peck

32. Bob Hope

33. James Cagney

34. Pat O'Brien

35. Ronald Colman

36. Edward Arnold

37. Orson Welles

38. Ray Milland

39. George Raft

40. Rex Harrison

41. Robert Taylor

42. Richard Widmark

43. Tyrone Power

44. John Garfield

45. Peter Finch

46. Van Heflin

47. Dick Van Dyke

48. Joel McCrea

49. Laurence Olivier

50. Randolph Scott

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Your list of favorite actors is a really nice mix. I'm surprised George Sanders doesn't rank higher. I'm surprised that Yul ranks as high as he does. And George Raft has made the cut. Glenn Ford! He's on the rise with you!

 

But there is one guy who is not happy with your list... and he's got a temper and a shotgun:

 

ondangerousground1.jpg

 

1. Robert Ryan

2. James Stewart

3. Cary Grant

4. Robert Mitchum

5. Humphrey Bogart

6. Henry Fonda

7. Boris Karloff

8. Dan Duryea

9. Richard Widmark

10. Burt Lancaster

11. Edward G. Robinson

12. Dana Andrews

13. Glenn Ford

14. Orson Welles

15. George Sanders

16. Peter Lorre

17. Sterling Hayden

18. Emil Jannings

19. Conrad Veidt

20. Joseph Cotten

21. John Wayne

22. Gregory Peck

23. Frank Sinatra

24. Gary Cooper

25. Clark Gable

26. Alan Ladd

27. Walter Huston

28. Van Heflin

29. Walter Brennan

30. Ward Bond

31. Dick Powell

32. Spencer Tracy

33. William Powell

34. Randolph Scott

35. Paul Newman

36. Montgomery Clift

37. Lee Marvin

38. Robert Montgomery

39. Joel McCrea

40. James Mason

41. William Holden

42. Raymond Burr

43. Laird Cregar

44. Bela Lugosi

45. Thomas Mitchell

46. Dennis O'Keefe

47. Martin Balsam

48. Ray Milland

49. Fredric March

50. Charles Boyer

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Top 10 Westerns...

 

1. Shane

 

2. The Hanging Tree

 

3. The Searchers

 

4. Red River

 

5. High Noon

 

6. Ride The High Country

 

7. 3:10 to Yuma

 

8. Rio Grande

 

9. Day of the Outlaw

 

10. The Naked Spur

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Your list of favorite actors is a really nice mix. I'm surprised George Sanders doesn't rank higher. I'm surprised that Yul ranks as high as he does. And George Raft has made the cut. Glenn Ford! He's on the rise with you!

>

 

My lists are ephemeral because they're based on my mood at the time. Yul's always ranked pretty high for me. And many of my favorites may have only made a handful of films I really like, but it's their characters I love. Whereas, someone like Cary Grant made many films I really like, but only played a handful of characters that appeal to me strongly.

 

> But there is one guy who is not happy with your list... and he's got a temper and a shotgun:

>

 

Oh, HECK, I knew I was forgetting someone, and here I have been watching his TV show all week. I'm sorry Wardy! He's definitely in my top 30, somehow, somewhere. To make room for him, I maybe should take out Dick Van Dyke, who made it for the first time solely based on his television show, which has brought me so much laughter the past year. But then, Dick is so skinny I don't know if the space he leaves is big enough for Wardy! :D

 

I wonder if the day will ever come that John Wayne cracks your top 20. And I'm disappointed to see Spencer Tracy ranked so low.

 

Nice to see Charles Boyer there, though.

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My lists are ephemeral because they're based on my mood at the time.

 

And that's a very good thing.

 

Yul's always ranked pretty high for me. And many of my favorites may have only made a handful of films I really like, but it's their characters I love. Whereas, someone like Cary Grant made many films I really like, but only played a handful of characters that appeal to me strongly.

 

I just don't hear you speak of Yul all that often. I usually like Cary's characters... a lot. But I can see where you wouldn't since his characters aren't that emotionally rich. Typically, Cary's characters are childish and selfish. He would be the "anti" Ford man. He would actually play Layne.

 

Oh, HECK, I knew I was forgetting someone, and here I have been watching his TV show all week. I'm sorry Wardy! He's definitely in my top 30, somehow, somewhere.

 

I need to bump him up my list, actually.

 

To make room for him, I maybe should take out Dick Van Dyke, who made it for the first time solely based on his television show, which has brought me so much laughter the past year. But then, Dick is so skinny I don't know if the space he leaves is big enough for Wardy! :D

 

:D Maybe "Rob" would top your favorite male television characters list.

 

I wonder if the day will ever come that John Wayne cracks your top 20.

 

Quite possibly. He's one of the warmest actors around; quite engaging.

 

And I'm disappointed to see Spencer Tracy ranked so low.

 

It's the films he's in, mostly. I like his 30s mug, the best.

 

Nice to see Charles Boyer there, though.

 

He's on the rise with me. I love his brand of tragic love. He's arguably the best.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> My lists are ephemeral because they're based on my mood at the time.

>

> And that's a very good thing.

>

 

For the most part, the cast of characters is the same, it's just the order shifts a little.

 

 

> I just don't hear you speak of Yul all that often. I usually like Cary's characters... a lot. But I can see where you wouldn't since his characters aren't that emotionally rich. Typically, Cary's characters are childish and selfish. He would be the "anti" Ford man. He would actually play Layne.

>

 

Yul didn't make too many films that come up for discussion. At least the ones that I like are not often mentioned (The Journey, Anastasia, Invitation to a Gunfighter, The Double Man). His most famous movies are not among my favorites (The Ten Commandments, The Magnificent Seven, Westworld). Even The King and I, which I like, is in a genre that I'm not crazy about lately (musicals).

 

> Oh, HECK, I knew I was forgetting someone, and here I have been watching his TV show all week. I'm sorry Wardy! He's definitely in my top 30, somehow, somewhere.

>

> I need to bump him up my list, actually.

>

 

Dear old Wardy. One of the hardest working men in show business. And probably in more "classics" than just about any other actor.

 

> :D Maybe "Rob" would top your favorite male television characters list.

>

 

He does.

 

> It's the films he's in, mostly. I like his 30s mug, the best.

>

 

I wish TCM would air *They Gave Me a Gun* again. It's from the 30s, and should be better known.

 

> He's on the rise with me. I love his brand of tragic love. He's arguably the best.

 

He can show tragic love without making himself tiresome about it.

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For the most part, the cast of characters is the same, it's just the order shifts a little.

 

But I'm sure your favorites have changed since you were younger.

 

Yul didn't make too many films that come up for discussion. At least the ones that I like are not often mentioned (The Journey, Anastasia, Invitation to a Gunfighter, The Double Man). His most famous movies are not among my favorites (The Ten Commandments, The Magnificent Seven, Westworld). Even The King and I, which I like, is in a genre that I'm not crazy about lately (musicals).

 

And those titles are why Yul and I have crossed paths just once.

 

Dear old Wardy. One of the hardest working men in show business. And probably in more "classics" than just about any other actor.

 

He's such an entertaining performer. I like his brand of "light."

 

I wish TCM would air They Gave Me a Gun again. It's from the 30s, and should be better known.

 

It's on March 21st at 8:15 AM EST.

 

He can show tragic love without making himself tiresome about it.

 

He's pure passion.

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Favorite lines of dialogue:

 

1. "As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again." Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) *Gone with the Wind*

 

2. "I'll think about that tomorrow." Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) *Gone with the Wind*

 

3. "In the end, you pay for what you are." Paul Boray (John Garfield) *Humoresque*

 

4. "What makes you so sad? I think you're the saddest girl I ever met."

"You're the first man who said that. Most people tell me how happy I am."

"That's because you make a man feel happy." (Gay Langan and Rosalyn Taber

(Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe) *The Misfits*

 

5. "Nothing human ever disgusts me." Hannah Jelks (Deborah Kerr) *Night of the Iguana*

 

6. "I know you are there, my son." Gwillym Morgan (Donald Crisp) *How Green Was My Valley*

 

7. "I don't bite, unless it's called for." Regina Lambert (Audrey Hepburn) *Charade*

 

8. "I'm not like anyone. I'm me." Gloria Wandrous (Elizabeth Taylor) *Butterfield 8*

 

9. "Mac, have you ever been in love?"

"No, I've been a bartender all my life." Wyatt Earp and Mac (Henry Fonda and J. Farrell MacDonald) *My Darling Clementine*

 

10. "Miss Stevens, you are a girl in a million...not only did I enjoy that kiss, I was awed

by the efficiency behind it." John Robie (Cary Grant) *To Catch a Thief*

 

11. "Tell your mother there are no more guns in the valley." *Shane* (Alan Ladd)

 

12. "It's one career all females have in common, being a woman." Margo Channing (Bette Davis) *All About Eve*

 

13. "You sure got wrong ideas."

"They may be wrong, but they're definite." Lora Mae Finnie Hollingsway (Linda Darnell) and Porter Hollingsway (Paul Douglas) *A Letter to Three Wives*

 

14. "I can be smart, when it's important, but most men don't like it." Lorelei Lee (Marilyn Monroe) *Gentlemen Prefer Blondes*

 

15. "Build my gallows high." Jeff Baily (Robert Mitchum) *Out of the Past*

 

16. "What is your nationality?"

"I'm a drunkard."

"That makes Rick a citizen of the world!" Major Strasser, Rick Blaine and Capt. Renault (Conrad Veidt, Humphrey Bogart and Claude Raines) *Casablanca*

 

17. My dear ever since Eve, no woman has been taken completely unaware." Captain Gregg (Rex Harrison) The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

 

18. Well, they're saved from the blessings of civilization." Doc Boone (Thomas Mitchell) Stagecoach

 

19. "You got types?"

"Just one. Lanky brunettes with wicked jaws." Nora and Nick Charles (Myrna Loy and William Powell) *The Thin Man*

 

20. "Statistics show there are more women in the world than anything else. Except insects." Johnny Farrow (Glenn Ford) *Gilda*

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> For the most part, the cast of characters is the same, it's just the order shifts a little.

>

> But I'm sure your favorites have changed since you were younger.

>

 

they reflected more romance, hope and girlishness. More Audrey Hepburn.

 

> I wish TCM would air They Gave Me a Gun again. It's from the 30s, and should be better known.

>

> It's on March 21st at 8:15 AM EST.

>

 

Thank you, I'll set up a reminder.

 

> He can show tragic love without making himself tiresome about it.

>

> He's pure passion.

 

But he shrugs and blames no one but himself when he loses. I like that.

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they reflected more romance, hope and girlishness. More Audrey Hepburn.

 

That's very typical of girls.

 

But he shrugs and blames no one but himself when he loses. I like that.

 

Excellent point. He really is that. And I do love that about his characters and performances.

 

Your recent list is exceptional, Scarlett.

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> That's very typical of girls.

>

 

How have your tastes changed? Less girlish?

 

>

> Excellent point. He really is that. And I do love that about his characters and performances.

>

 

His tragic lovers trail a somewhat film noir vibe. It's hard to do. An American film noir "hero" is often too self-conscious to exude passion to the end...when they get wise they either deflate or become mocking, tossing love aside like an empty pack of cigarettes. Boyer remains self-mocking, but wears his pain like a well earned badge.

 

> Your recent list is exceptional, Scarlett.

 

Thank you.

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How have your tastes changed? Less girlish?

 

:D Sadly, it's the opposite. I like romance now. I had no patience for that about five or so years ago.

 

I've always been very boyish. I never really had mature tastes. That's now changed. I now like films that make me feel and think, the most.

 

His tragic lovers trail a somewhat film noir vibe. It's hard to do. An American film noir "hero" is often too self-conscious to exude passion to the end...when they get wise they either deflate or become mocking, tossing love aside like an empty pack of cigarettes. Boyer remains self-mocking, but wears his pain like a well earned badge.

 

That's wonderful. :) Film noir protagonists are usually selfish and chasing something other than love, although they believe what they are pursuing is love.

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