Guest lamarr, hedy

What has happen to AMC?

71 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, calvinnme said:

It's interesting that 15 years after its demise, so many people have such fond distinct memories of the old AMC. Do you think that "Breaking Bad" or "Mad Men" ever got anybody through chemo and cancer? That when a couple gets old they'll say to one another "Remember that Christmas Eve marathon of Walking Dead when the little boy had to shoot his dying mother in the head to keep her from becoming a zombie? Oh the memories!" I doubt it.

Years from now AMC will be known for their shows like Breaking Bad and Mad Men much more so than showing 'old movies'.    Much more so. 

While I didn't watch Breaking Bad (too violent for my taste),  Mad Men was the only 'must see' T.V. show for the wife and I.     This original type programming is much more creative than showing movies madeby others decades ago.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

"Remember that Christmas Eve marathon of Walking Dead when the little boy had to shoot his dying mother in the head to keep her from becoming a zombie? Oh the memories!"

Sounds like my kind of people.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Years from now AMC will be known for their shows like Breaking Bad and Mad Men much more so than showing 'old movies'.    Much more so. 

While I didn't watch Breaking Bad (too violent for my taste),  Mad Men was the only 'must see' T.V. show for the wife and I.     This original type programming is much more creative than showing movies madeby others decades ago.

 

And they will also be known for turning the viewing of "The Godfather" into a five hour event due to it being stuffed with commercials.

I have to ask, JJG, if you really don't care for "movies made by others decades ago" what are you doing here, since that is a big part of what TCM does? I mean this in the most polite way possible. I really want to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

     I remember getting cable in the late 1980's when AMC and TNT were both showing old movies. At the time I was more interested in the MGM films TNT would show rather than AMC even though TNT would show commercials. I did tape some old films from AMC such as Paramount On Parade, King Of Jazz and Music Is Magic. I'm so sorry I didn't tape more of these gems from Paramount, Universal and Fox as they are rarely, if ever, shown anywhere. Currently I've been recording any TCM films that even remotely catch my interest as I don't want the same thing to happen again. You never know when TCM might change their format. I learned my lesson after AMC changed (for the worse). 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

And they will also be known for turning the viewing of "The Godfather" into a five hour event due to it being stuffed with commercials.

I have to ask, JJG, if you really don't care for "movies made by others decades ago" what are you doing here, since that is a big part of what TCM does? I mean this in the most polite way possible. I really want to know.

I love 'old movies' (what I call studio-era movies made from 1929 - 1968 or so).   That is what I love and TCM is my most watched station, by far.  

BUT unlike you I don't assume that AMC viewers are studio-era movie fans.  That AMC viewers watch TCM on a regular basis (in fact I assume most regular ACM viewers of their custom programs NEVER watch TCM).

To me your assumptions are bogus because you're assuming AMC viewers are like TCM viewers because you're a TCM viewer and you're at this website (come on,  the opinions from us on this website do NOT represent those of the general public,   again, far from it).

Oh, and Mad Men and now Better Call Sal are the ONLY shows I tune it to AMC for.   Why????  Because these programs are ONLY shown on AMC.    

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I love 'old movies' (what I call studio-era movies made from 1929 - 1968 or so).   That is what I love and TCM is my most watched station, by far.  

BUT unlike you I don't assume that AMC viewers are studio-era movie fans.  That AMC viewers watch TCM on a regular basis (in fact I assume most regular ACM viewers of their custom programs NEVER watch TCM).

To me your assumptions are bogus because you're assuming AMC viewers are like TCM viewers because you're a TCM viewer and you're at this website (come on,  the opinions from us on this website do NOT represent those of the general public,   again, far from it).

Oh, and Mad Men and now Better Call Sal are the ONLY shows I tune it to AMC for.   Why????  Because these programs are ONLY shown on AMC.    

 

I know that  AMC viewers are no longer like TCM viewers. I'm just remembering when AMC showed studio era films. I know they are trying to go to that "younger demographic", I know that they are probably doing better at turning a profit. However, like someone else here mentioned, it was the only place you could find the rare Fox, Universal, and Paramount films that no longer have a home anywhere. Now the so-called classic part of Fox Movie Channel should be renamed "How Fox went to s**t after Darryl F. Zanuck lost interest and went to Europe". They show a bunch of C- films from the late 50s and early 60s and nothing of the classic rarities they once showed. I have been able to find some of the rare Universals and Paramounts on the collector scene, but these are always DVDs burned from old AMC tapes because they still have the watermark. You don't know what you've got until it's gone.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, calvinnme said:

I know that  AMC viewers are no longer like TCM viewers. I'm just remembering when AMC showed studio era films. I know they are trying to go to that "younger demographic", I know that they are probably doing better at turning a profit. However, like someone else here mentioned, it was the only place you could find the rare Fox, Universal, and Paramount films that no longer have a home anywhere. Now the so-called classic part of Fox Movie Channel should be renamed "How Fox went to s**t after Darryl F. Zanuck lost interest and went to Europe". They show a bunch of C- films from the late 50s and early 60s and nothing of the classic rarities they once showed. I have been able to find some of the rare Universals and Paramounts on the collector scene, but these are always DVDs burned from old AMC tapes because they still have the watermark. You don't know what you've got until it's gone.

I also miss the 'old' AMC but since TCM has been on the air,  commercial free, for over 20 years I don't miss it that much.    Clearly TCM doesn't focus on films from major studios like Fox, Universal,  Columbia or Paramount as much as Warner, MGM and RKO (those in the so-called Turner Library).     Also,  TCM is 'light' when it comes to films from studios like Republic and United Artist.   

While there are now some new over the air stations like Me-TV, Get-TV (many Columbia films) and MOVIES (mostly Fox films) that feature films TCM doesn't show (or rarely shows),   these stations have commercials and they do edit for content which typically doesn't impact a studio-era movie but sometimes like with MOVIES and The Dark Corner (Stevens \ Ball - 1946) content is 'blocked out'! 

But today,  there is more access to content then there ever was.    One just has to be willing to pony up the money if they want commercial free access.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to watch AMC regularly and recorded many of their films on my VCR, back when they were the only station that I knew that showed those vintage studio era films that I grew up with in a commercial free format.
When they began commercializing I eventually stopped watching AMC, except on a very rare occasion, and gravitated ever more toward TCM. I wasn't aware that I was a "classic" film fan in those days, I was just a nostalgia freak.
Eventually though I became seriously interested in film history and preservation, and owe much of that stimulation to TCM.
I think that many of us here that can still remember the old AMC, and are somewhat fanatical about TCM, probably have much in common. The generation that began watching the latter AMC are a different breed.
"We" fondly remember the "old" AMC because it was a precursor to TCM for us. The current crop of AMC fans will remember AMC for different reasons.

While I too devote about 80% of my present TV time to TCM, I do watch a few other things... Primarily PBS (also "uncut" and "commercial free"). Occasionally I check out some of my old haunts over at the History, NG, & Discovery channels, but I have long since stopped recording them as I found editing out the multitude of commercials way too time consuming and laborious. I did get sucked into Vikings, but opt for watching a season at a pop from DVD's checked out from my local library. Similar some of the older and more current seasonal mini-marathons from HBO that I am fond of.

I too became caught up in AMC's MAD MEN, back when it was something fresh and, yes, nostalgically sixty-ish. I suffered through the commercials because I was entranced by the program. I later made the mistake of catching a rerun of an early episode of BREAKING BAD, and got caught up in sympathizing with the plight of Walter White, who at that time was an underpaid, underappreciated, educator with terminal cancer, who desired only to make enough money so that his family would be taken care of once he was gone. I never dreamed that I could become mesmerized by a program about "meth" dealers. But somehow this program drew me in. So after viewing a few episodes on TV I eventually watched the whole series on DVD's checked out from my local library. So I guess it was natural for me to give the prequel BETTER CALL SAUL a try out when it appeared. Again, sucked in by the great writing talent at work developing these characters.
The thought of watching an on-going series about a zombies apocalypse was also something that I thought I could never get into. Perhaps it was due to a misdirected sense of "loyalty" to George Romero, Richard Matheson, and all those old zombie "classics" that I saw as a kid. But one evening I again erred and flipped on AMC during an episode of THE WALKING DEAD. I discovered that it was really a post-apocalypse survival adventure, with zombies thrown in as an added, ever present danger. But the real monsters in the show are us! Or what would (will) remain of us following a societal collapse, pandemic or not. Again, sucked in, and again back to the library so that I could view the entire series in chronological order (without the plethora of commercials). Then came the parallel FEAR THE WALKING DEAD series, ad infinitum... 
So for me, the "new" AMC has become an original series "testing" ground. I may watch an episode or two of something "new" and if I find it interesting I will request the commercial free DVD's from my local library. The only thing that I dislike about some of these thus far incomplete series' is that they have no "conclusion" in sight.

I thought that I had out-grown my penchant for fantasies, but then someone turned me on to HBO's  GAME OF THRONES. The series was already four seasons old at the time, and the library had all of them, so I checked them out one weekend and.... hooked again. And I have suffered through the intolerable annual wait ever since.
Thankfully (though I know that I will also be saddened by withdrawals when it finally happens) this series (which has long outgrown George R.R. Martin's book series) is  due to conclude next year (2019). By that time I will have to re-watch the entire series again just to bring myself back up to date.
I remember when HBO was something "brand new" and later competed for my attention with ON subscription TV back in the early 80's. That was when those that could had those giant Satellite Dishes mounted in their back yards. ON died on the vine, but HBO survived and at that time became the "king" of "original" and very interesting programing.
For a number of years I used to subscribe to HBO and was privy to a host of their wonderful shows from documentaries to movies to their award winning mini-series', from BAND OF BROTHERS to ROME to JOHN ADAMS (and everything in-between), HBO rarely disappointed me. But when cable kept hiking their prices I trimmed myself way down and today only keep my current TV provider for the sake of TCM, otherwise I'd likely just be paying for use of an ISP.

Used to be a frequent customer of video rental stores, and eventually subscribed to NetFlix for their mail-order DVD's (and later "free" on-line programing). I suppose that I could always go back to that, and maybe a couple of on-line ala carte subscriptions, if TCM ever decides to go the way of AMC (commercial wise).
If that should eventually happen then, in 10 or 20 years, a few "old-timers" will be fondly recalling the "old" TCM as some of us remember the "old" AMC today.

My "problem" at present is how to eventually "dispose" of my collection (library) of literally thousands of DVDs that I've recorded, transferred from VHS, and purchased over the years. I suppose I could donate my original "purchased" DVDs to the public library. But I still have hundreds of recordings that I've never gotten around to finalizing (though I still possess two or three of the original and still functioning DVR's for that chore). I've transferred hundreds of videos to HDs and recorded hundreds more directly to several compact hard drives. But they are all reliant upon the current technologies (hard and software) for continued view-ability.
Over the years I've devoted thousands of dollars and hours to this obsessive (compulsive) "hobby", and it saddens me that when I am eventually gone, that none of my grandchildren will likely appreciate these "old" things of mine (even if they still are technically able to watch them).
I even still have a few of my old toys buried in storage that my mom kept.

Over the years (along with the loss of family, "friends", people I grew up with, associates, and old "battle buddies") I have endured the loss of my hard copy library and most of my other "acquired" earthly "treasures" (through theft, vandalism, and environmental disaster). 
When I contemplate my own mortality I feel like I should attempt to find some respectful "home" for what I have left, if possible.
Wow, this post certainly took a morbid turn all of a sudden... Time to close. :huh::unsure:

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah.  I too, doubt channels like ANTENNA TV and MeTV  or DECADES will someday have marathons and/or show reruns of shows like  "Naked And Afraid",   "Leaving Amish" or even  "American Horror Story" 30-40 or so years from now.   Or.....

"Hey!  Remember when those GYPSIES got in that BIG FIGHT at that WEDDING?"  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just hope TCM doesn't go the way of AMC and abandon its studio era-film formats (with the occasional 70's, 80's, 90's, 2000's thrown in there to put a little balance in there).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I just hope TCM doesn't go the way of AMC and abandon its studio era-film formats (with the occasional 70's, 80's, 90's, 2000's thrown in there to put a little balance in there).

 

I doubt TCM will do that.   Instead they will just no longer broadcast since most people will be using streaming services and most cable T.V. services will end.    When this happens is anyone's guess but I can see this within 10 years.   

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saddens me to think of TCM becoming extinct, but with streaming services and youtube out on the market, certainly cannot dismiss the possibility of it happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I just hope TCM doesn't go the way of AMC and abandon its studio era-film formats (with the occasional 70's, 80's, 90's, 2000's thrown in there to put a little balance in there).

Well, we're sort of missing the point that AMC went that way because of TCM.  

No one's starving TCM out when they own the refrigerator, and they've already got enough of a DVD market with the Warner Archive that they don't need to start producing "Original Programming" to sell with their name on it, like AMC, Starz and Showtime did to fill the void and pay the bills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 2:50 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Years from now AMC will be known for their shows like Breaking Bad and Mad Men much more so than showing 'old movies'.    Much more so. 

While I didn't watch Breaking Bad (too violent for my taste),  Mad Men was the only 'must see' T.V. show for the wife and I.     This original type programming is much more creative than showing movies madeby others decades ago.

 

Loved "B. Bad' but the network was better before

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 2:50 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Years from now AMC will be known for their shows like Breaking Bad and Mad Men much more so than showing 'old movies'.    Much more so. 

True.

There'll come a time when its beginnings will be forgotten and will only be mentioned when people ask quizzically "why does that channel call itself American Movie Classics"?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plus too, you gotta wonder how many of those born AFTER the channel changed might be thinking the current channel has something to do with the MOVIE THEATER CHAIN!  :o

Sepiatone

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a load of this. AMC is running a series based on Dan Simmons' book "The Terror". While I attempted to watch the first installment, I couldn't understand a word the actors were saying.

I did a bit of research and found the book for sale on Amazon and highly recommended by posters there. So I bought it. Now dig this. I was reading the dedication. "...with much love and many thanks for the indelible Artic

memories to Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan, Robert Cornwaite...Dmitri Tiomkin...etc and I'm like, wait a minute. I know these people. I read it again and figured out that these are

people connected to the film, "Thinig from Another World". Wowee!!! How cool is that?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been watching The Terror as well. I know what you mean about the thick, mumbled accents, but I've grown accustomed to them. They also use period maritime jargon without explaining it for the audience, leaving it up to the viewer to figure it out, which I don't mind at all. In fact, I dislike it when they pander to modern sensibilities in period material. 

The show has been a slow burn, but it's not without its moments so far. Also knowing that it's a limited series with a short number of episodes and that everything will be resolved by the end, helps a great deal, as I don't have to wonder if the show runners know where they are going or not with the story. And I was a fan of Dan Simmons' work that I've read in the past.

the-terror-tv-show.jpg?w=552&h=276

v1.dDsyODI4MzA7ajsxNzY0MzsxMjAwOzE2MDA7M  post_tt2708480.jpg?1 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've been watching The Terror as well. I know what you mean about the thick, mumbled accents, but I've grown accustomed to them. They also use period maritime jargon without explaining it for the audience, leaving it up to the viewer to figure it out, which I don't mind at all. In fact, I dislike it when they pander to modern sensibilities in period material. 

The show has been a slow burn, but it's not without its moments so far. Also knowing that it's a limited series with a short number of episodes and that everything will be resolved by the end, helps a great deal, as I don't have to wonder if the show runners know where they are going or not with the story. And I was a fan of Dan Simmons' work that I've read in the past.

the-terror-tv-show.jpg?w=552&h=276

v1.dDsyODI4MzA7ajsxNzY0MzsxMjAwOzE2MDA7M  post_tt2708480.jpg?1 

I watched episode 3 on demand this morning. I am still grossed out by blood and gore in the movies, even as I am nearing retirement age, but the book is pretty gory too. Can't wait to find out what this monster is.

I noticed these guys' faces aren't covered and they are not wearing all that much protection from the cold. In the book, the temps are well below freezing. But I figure they want us to see the actor's faces.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2018 at 6:36 PM, Janet0312 said:

 

I noticed these guys' faces aren't covered and they are not wearing all that much protection from the cold. In the book, the temps are well below freezing. But I figure they want us to see the actor's faces.

Well, yeah.  Otherwise, why bother FILMING it at all?  :blink:  AND hiring actors to boot?  :P

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE FXM IS SHOWING MORE RETRO FILMS.  THEY HAVE SHOWN HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, DOWN ARGENTINE WAY, LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN AND THIEVES HIGHWAY TO NAME A FEW.  WHEN I GET FRUSTRATED WITH TCM, I SWITCH TO FXM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us