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FredCDobbs

?The House of Rothschild? Mon. AM 2/7

47 posts in this topic

Just checked archive.org again. And the reds are definitely red! So it must be three-strip.

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That?s the way it looked to me in the YouTube clip, although the colors weren?t very vivid in that clip.

 

In a 2-strip film, all the ?reds? will be a dark orange color, and there are no deep blues or deep greens, and no yellows.

 

I think for the 2-strip, orange and blue-green filters were used because the orange tends to match skin colors, and the blue-green works for sky, trees, and lakes. In Westerns made in the 1950s, the combination of the two colors produced a pretty good brown for a lot of the old wooden buildings and barns.

 

But at formal dances, with 2-strip you?ll only see bluish and orangeish dresses. None will be red, yellow, or green.

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> In a 2-strip film, all the “reds” will be a dark orange color, and there are no deep blues or deep greens, and no yellows.

 

I thought the reds were pinkish, and I really have to disagree with the assertion that there aren't any yellows. From the "Singin' In the Rain" finale from *Hollywood Revue of 1929*, here's Joan Crawford (I think that's her, next to what looks like Buster Keaton):

 

hollywoodrevue_singing.jpg

 

Yellow is the color you get when you mix equal amounts red light and green light, so it stands to reason that with a red filter and a blue-green filter, you'd get something reasonably approximating yellow.

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I have a dye-transfer print of LA CUCARACHA. It's amazing how the texture of the fabrics is replicated, almost as though you could feel them were you to touch the screen.

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Dr. Goebbels produced a remake of this classic shot-for-shot.

He hardly changed a thing; the sets appear identical.

The National Socialist version was a huge hit in Hitler's Germany. Prints may be obtained through current neo-Nazi sites.

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Goebbels also used parts of The House of Rothschild, without permission of course,

in the notorious propaganda film The Eternal Jew. The Nazi version of the movie is also

available on archive.org.

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> {quote:title=Fedya wrote:}{quote}

> > In a 2-strip film, all the “reds” will be a dark orange color, and there are no deep blues or deep greens, and no yellows.

>

> I thought the reds were pinkish, and I really have to disagree with the assertion that there aren't any yellows. From the "Singin' In the Rain" finale from *Hollywood Revue of 1929*, here's Joan Crawford (I think that's her, next to what looks like Buster Keaton):

>

> hollywoodrevue_singing.jpg

>

> Yellow is the color you get when you mix equal amounts red light and green light, so it stands to reason that with a red filter and a blue-green filter, you'd get something reasonably approximating yellow.

 

 

Hi Fedya,

I believe that it is George K. Arthur that is next to Joan.

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> {quote:title=Fedya wrote:}{quote}

>From the "Singin' In the Rain" finale from *Hollywood Revue of 1929*, here's Joan Crawford (I think that's her, next to what looks like Buster Keaton):

>

> hollywoodrevue_singing.jpg

>

That's George K. Arthur, not Buster Keaton next to Joan.

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The German actor who played the lead in the Goebbels version is hanged inside a cage(!) above a street of cheering throng, as I remember it.

That actor (and others) had "lots of 'splaining" to do after the war; career in tatters, of course.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> Apparently they were still experimenting with 3-strip in 1934. I think I read that Becky Sharp (1935) was the first 3-strip feature.

>

> TCM has aired the 20-minute short La Cucaracha (1934) several times and it was one of the first shot in 3-strip. The color of it is just great.

 

Hi Fred,

LA CUCARACHA was one of the first live action short short films shot in the 3 strip Technicolor process. Walt Disney had been using the 3 strip process since 1932 with the Silly Symphony FLOWERS AND TREES. He had an exclusivity deal with Technicolor, which is why all of the other studio's (notably Warner's and MGM) color cartoons made until late 1935 use the old two color process.

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Yes, it is on both YouTube and Archive.org. The YT copy, or whatever is the right word,

is pretty bad visually and it's in German with no subtitles. The Archive one is better

visually and has colored subtitles.

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> I wonder how Disney got exclusive rights to it?

 

I presume they signed a contract and paid money. ;-)

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*I wonder how Disney got exclusive rights to it?*

 

He was willing to work with Technicolor at a time when most studios thought that 3-Strip Technicolor was too expensive and too cumbersome to use on regular basis.

 

Because, in the beginning, he was making six to eight minute animated cartoons instead of 90 min to 2 hour features, it was less of a financial burden and risk for Disney to partner with Technicolor.

 

When Disney's Technicolor *Silly Symphonies* began to win Oscars, the studios started to take note.

 

Because he had been willing to take a chance with Technicolor, when he made *Snow White*, the first feature length animated feature done in 3-Strip, Technicolor was more willing to help Disney take a gamble on the feature length animated film.

 

The rest is history.

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Thanks for the information.

 

Here?s his ?Flowers and Trees? from 1932. The original print was probably a little more vivid than this:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMtLDg4rlNQ

 

IMDB says this is a 3-strip Technicolor film.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0022899/

 

Here?s a list of his Academy Awards, going back to this film in 1932:

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000370/awards

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> > Maybe TCM can just show House of Frankenstein instead. I understand that's fictional.

>

> One of my hillbilly relatives opened up a bank in Kentucky in the 1880s.

>

> He got away with $8,000.

>

> Here's a picture of the House of Dobbs:

> http://gulfshoressteven.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/hatfieldclan2.jpg

 

That looks like a young L.Q. Jones in front of the doorway.

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