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charliechaplin101

AMC is totally ripping off TCM

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Speaking of AMC, I caught The Dirty Dozen on AMC the other night. This is one of those Turner library films, so why is a Turner film airing on a a network that isn't owned by Warner since I was under the impression that TCM/TBS/TNT had exclusive rights to the Turner catalog?!

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Hibi, I'm with you! I never had AMC back when it was good, unfortunately. I got it the first time when they were already showing ads in between the movies. I was shocked to see those, but I was ok with it, as you mentioned. That was the last year they had the GREAT AMC Monsterfest with the true classics and they really went all out that particular year, they aired TONS of classic horror films during the fest!

 

I would love it if if AMC was back the way it was before the change (or another channel like it), along with TCM. Perhaps the new digital sub-channel thing will be where that happens? Probably not commercial free though, unfortunately.

 

Oh I forgot, I also had TNT when they showed classic films! I used to love that, even with the ads. In fact, I sometimes wish TCM would utilize some of that style, when they celebrated a birthday during the day for example, you always knew it because they'd have some little interstitial about it in between the ad breaks. Unfortunately my cable service didn't pick up TCM until the middle 2000's, so I also missed many of the great years of this channel. But I still dig it (not too much into this year's Oscar's Month, but hey, it gets better next month!).

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*I caught The Dirty Dozen on AMC the other night. This is one of those Turner library films, so why is a Turner film airing on a a network that isn't owned by Warner since I was under the impression that TCM/TBS/TNT had exclusive rights to the Turner catalog?!*

 

There is no Turner catalog and hasn't been for almost twelve years now. When Ted Turner merged his media empire with Time-Warner back in the mid-to-late 1990s, the film library that he retained from his all-too-brief purchase of MGM was part of that merger.

 

Since then, the former Turner film library has been under the care of Warner Brothers (where it was reunited with its other half (the post-1948 WB films).

 

TCM has to rent all the films it shows including the films that were once part of its film library.

 

There is no exclusive deal between Warners and TCM.

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I spent several years happily watching classics on AMC with Bob Dorian. I honestly thought that AMC and TCM were owned by the same company and that they had decided to make AMC more modern and show all the golden oldies on TCM. I used to yell at Robert Osborne "Who are you and what have you done with Dorian?"

 

AMC used to put on promos that were supposed to be staged in a radio studio. They had a guy at a stand-up microphone with his hand cupping his ear reading in dulcet tones what AMC was going to show next, and occasionally a commercial chorus in the background. You expected them to tell you to go right out and buy Sal Hepatica or something. If they had those kinds of commercials I would have no objections whatsoever.

 

TCM occasionally shows the same lineups I remember from my AMC days. Last fall they showed The Ex-Mrs. Bradford back to back with the original Raffles. I still have a videotape I made of AMC doing the same thing in 1992.

 

I miss Bob and I really miss Remember WENN.

 

Edited by: KTJ on Feb 25, 2011 3:04 PM

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I'm aware that the Turner catalog is now owned by Warner Bros., but my point was that I almost never see the Turner-owned Warner Bros. titles on any network other than TCM, TNT or TBS, which is why I was surprised to see The Dirty Dozen on AMC.

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"AMC used to put on promos that were supposed to be staged in a radio studio. They had a guy at a stand-up microphone with his hand cupping his ear reading in dulcet tones what AMC was going to show next, and occasionally a commercial chorus in the background. You expected them to tell you to go right out and buy Sal Hepatica or something. If they had those kinds of commercials I would have no objections whatsoever."

 

That was J.K. Simmons. In addition to the AMC promos he also appeared in at least one episode of Remember Wenn. He's had lots of TV work as the shrink on Law and Order, one of the assistant police chiefs on The Closer and more commercials than I can count.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._K._Simmons

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> {quote:title=soniquemd21921 wrote:}{quote}

> I'm aware that the Turner catalog is now owned by Warner Bros., but my point was that I almost never see the Turner-owned Warner Bros. titles on any network other than TCM, TNT or TBS, which is why I was surprised to see The Dirty Dozen on AMC.

 

Yes, you're right. Infact, in the pre TCM/TNT days AMC used to be the place to go if you wanted to watch CLASSIC MGM musicals, like SINGIN IN THE RAIN or AN AMERICAN IN PARIS. Now the MGM MUSICALS, if not property, are exclusively shown on TCM, with some films like WIZARD OF OZ still popping up on TNT, with commercials. For the most part, it appears at least to me, that the older CLASSIC films from Warner Bros., MGM, and RKO pre 1960 are still exclusively shown on TCM, irrespective of who owns what, not because AMC or other channels may or may not want them, but because that may have been part of whatever deal was made when TCM sold their library, that they retain exlusive rights to air those pre 1960 classic films.

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*but because that may have been part of whatever deal was made when TCM sold their library, that they retain exlusive rights to air those pre 1960 classic films.*

 

The Turner channels don't have exclusive rights to the former Turner film library. You guys need to extend your channel watching as films from the former Turner film library turn up on the HBO channels, the Showtime channels, Cinemax channels, (often in the very early morning hours), Encore channels, Retroplex, Multiplex and a few others.

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> *but because that may have been part of whatever deal was made when TCM sold their library, that they retain exlusive rights to air those pre 1960 classic films.*

>

> The Turner channels don't have exclusive rights to the former Turner film library. You guys need to extend your channel watching as films from the former Turner film library turn up on the HBO channels, the Showtime channels, Cinemax channels, (often in the very early morning hours), Encore channels, Retroplex, Multiplex and a few others.

 

 

I wish Ted still owned the channel.

 

LZ, respect you, my friend, but those channels are not showing early 30's films from the former Turner library. At best, they are showing 50's, 60's stuff, if that. I have many of those channels and they just aren't. TCM is the only hope for those of us hungry for 30's and 40's B/W films on TV and not from a DVD collection.

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*LZ, respect you, my friend, but those channels are not showing early 30's films from the former Turner library. At best, they are showing 50's, 60's stuff, if that. I have many of those channels and they just aren't. TCM is the only hope for those of us hungry for 30's and 40's B/W films on TV and not from a DVD collection.*

 

Mark,

 

I agree that they aren't showing the 1930s films from the former library. My point was that TCM and the other Turner channels do not have an exclusive deal with Warners for the pre-1960 films in the former Turner film library.

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IZ, you constantly claim that TCM no longer has any kind of film library. I just found this interview with ROBERT OSBORNE from January 31, 2008. He makes reference throughout to TCM's library. What library is that if none exists?

 

 

Posted by Cinema Retro in Interviews on Thursday, January 31. 2008

 

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH TURNER MOVIE CLASSICS ...

Celebrating Films of the 1960s & 1970s

 

For movie fans, there is no more frantic time of year than when Turner Classic Movies presents its annual 31 Days of Oscar festival. For the entire month of February, movie lovers will be watching and recording an amazing array of films that have either won or have been nominated for Oscars. To get readers into the proper spirit, Cinema Retro Editor-in-Chief Lee Pfeiffer chatted with Robert Osborne, the popular host of TCM's movie broadcasts. Osborne, who is also the official Oscar historian, is well known for his informative introductions and epilogues for the films that TCM broadcasts. Director Sidney Lumet once said that even if he doesn't desire to see certain films, he always tries to tune in for Osborne's introductions. Osborne is as affable offscreen as he is on the air. Witty, knowledgable and conversant in all things Hollywood-related, he has many of the attributes he ascribes to the stars he grew up idolizing. In addition to being a columnist for the Hollywood Reporter, Osborne is by all accounts America's premiere film historian.

 

CR: You seem to have every movie lover's dream job: to get paid to watch and analyze classic movies. How did this come about and what led to your association with the Academy?

 

RO: When I was first starting out as an actor, I was under contract to Lucille Ball at Desilu Studios, which was owned by Lucy and Desi Arnaz. Lucy knew I had this passion for movie history which at that time was not a normal thing. Most people weren't interested in movie history. She said, "You know, you would have a happier life as a writer than as an actor. You should be writing about movies, because nobody is." She told me that she thought being an actor would never make me happy, but writing would. She knew I was a journalism major at the University of Washington. She told me that if I took up writing as a profession, the first thing I had to do was write a book because people would look at you differently if I did. She told me it didn't even have to be a good book, but that everyone is impressed with anyone who writes a book because most people lack the discipline to do it. I knew she was telling me this for my own good, not some other agenda, so I quit being an actor and became a writer.

 

The thing I decided to write about was the Academy Awards because you could always find a list of who won Oscars, but you could never find a list of who was nominated. It was even hard to get one from the Academy because that was a very small organization at the time. So I wrote this book and it hit a chord with people because you couldn't get a book about the Oscars anywhere else. The cult success of that book has followed me around ever since. Years later, when they decided they wanted a history done of the Academy, they asked me to write it. (The latest edition of the book is titled 75 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards-Ed.)

 

CR: So you owe a lot to Lucille Ball...

 

RO: I do, and for many reasons. She was right on because when I was trying to get a start at the Hollywood Reporter, it was having written a book that put me ahead of my competition. She knew my personality and told me that because I came from a small town in the northwest, I wouldn't be able to easily compete with tough people from New York that had come up through the ranks. She told me she didn't think acting would make me happy. She was a great psychiatrist and pyschoanalyst. She had plenty of street smarts.

 

CR: How long have you been associated with Turner Classic Movies?

 

RO: Since we went on the air in 1994, actually.

 

CR: How long does it take you to prepare your introductions for the seemingly countless number of movies you discuss in a given month?

 

RO: I take about two weeks a month writing and rewriting them. Sometimes people construct an intro and I take it and put it in my own words or add material. Say it's about a Bette Davis movie and I happen to know how Bette Davis felt about the movie, I will add that to the script. After working on the scripts for about two weeks, I go to Atlanta and spend about five days taping 150 of them. So its a process that takes about three weeks. Then I'm also doing the Private Screenings series or filming with a guest programmer. It's never a burden because I would be doing all this as a hobby if not a profession, so it all goes back to Lucy. It alllows me to be doing what I'm really interested in. I'm very lucky in that sense. There are many people who are very knowledgable about film and should be doing this and I feel fortunate that I got to be the one to do the job.

 

CR: I'm not trying to pander here, but...

 

RO: Oh, you can pander a little bit!

 

CR: Alright, what separates you from many other so-called "movie experts" is that you really do display a genuine knowledge and enthusiasm for classic films. You're not just reading a teleprompter. I think the fact that you also knew so many of these movie legends also adds immeasurably to your work.

 

RO: I went to California at a time when it was relatively easy to meet these people. If you had a good suit and fairly good manners, you would be invited to places. If you went to a party, there would be Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood and Cary Grant and Henry Fonda with their wives. Many of the people were of an age where they weren't working that much any more. They loved somebody like me because I knew their history. It's hard to believe, but back then you could see Cary Grant at a party but most people didn't care that much because his day was largely over. There wasn't nostalgia around or a passion for these people. So they loved someone like me to talk to because I knew about their careers - and they were willing to chit-chat about it. If I had been out there fifteen years earlier, they would have been busy with their careers and they wouldn't have had time for me. If I had gone out there fifteen years later, many would have been retired or dead. I got out there at a perfect time in terms of being able to meet some of these people.

 

CR: Most of what passed for film journalism in the 1960s was still of the Hedda Hopper/Louella Parsons gossip news.

 

RO: Yes, and there was also a great rapport in those days between journalists and publicists. There was a guy named John Flynn, who was Jimmy Stewart's publicist. He would call up and he and Jimmy would take you out to lunch at least once a year. I could ask Jimmy about his career, past or present, and they would get some good newspaper space and I would get a good interview. Today, there's a very hostile feeling between the press and celebrities for good reason. A lot of press that is hostile to the celebrities is looking for negative things to write about.It wasn't just Hedda Hopper, Louella Parsons and Sheila Graham- there was a lot of journalism that wasn't gossip. It wasn't necessarily pandering journalism and interesting stories were being written. Those early interviews that Rex Reed used to do were dynamite. He had great insights into some of these people.

 

CR: Yes, and Peter Bogdanovich had the foresight to interview legendary actors and filmmakers who were being all but ignored by the mainstream press.

 

RO: Exactly.

 

CR: Let's talk about TCM's 31 Days of Oscar. This is the fourteenth annual one of these that the network has done and I believe there are some films making their debuts on the network during this festival.

 

RO: Yes, and one I'm particularly excited about is Wings which is the first movie to ever win the Oscar for Best Picture. We're also showing the first Lord of the Rings movie. So we're covering the Oscars from the first year right up into the 2000s. Older films make up the bulk of our library and are the strength of our library, but we bring in new films to keep the schedule fresh. We have a deal with Columbia Pictures for a few years so we're showing the whole Columbia library. That will allow us to show films like Cover Girl with Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly, Irene Dunne films we've never shown before and a lot of interesting stuff. We want to appeal to all ages and there's no one era that appeals to everybody. Some people love the Val Lewton horror films of the 1940s and some people love those B space films from the 1950s. We hope that someone who never saw our channel will watch Lord of the Rings and come back and discover John Garfield. I was at an event the other night and Lauren Bacall was talking and she said, "If you've never seen Topaze starrring John Barrymore from 1933, then to you that's not an old film - it's a new film." She's right. If you've never seen Casablanca, made in 1943, then that's a new film. She was talking about Turner and what an adventure it is to have these new experiences if you've never seen these movies before.

 

CR: We occasionally introduce classic movies at the famous Film Forum theater in New York as well as the Loews Jersey City theater, a restored movie palace...

 

RO: Yes, I'm familiar with it...

 

CR: ...and I always say I envy people who haven't seen these films before because they get to experience it for the first time.

 

RO: I said the same thing to someone the other day who had not seen Sunset Boulevard. I said, "My God, I envy you! To see Sunset Boulevard for the first time? You are so lucky!"

 

CR: With the demise of AMC as a viable network for classic movie lovers - at least since they started chopping up films and inserting commercials- it looks like Turner stands alone in fighting the good fight in showing movies in their original versions.

 

RO: Certainly, no one is doing it with the interstitials that we have and the presentations that we have and the extensive library that we have. It's so essential to see films without commercial breaks and interruptions. If you see Hitchcock's Rebecca, which we're showing during the 31 Days of Oscar,that whole movie is predicated on mood and slow suspense. You can't break that mood for a commercial. You lose the the rythym and the impact of it.

 

CR: Turner was also instrumental in waging a campaign over the years to educate viewers about the necessity of showing films in their widescreen formats. Do you think the public is now more accepting of the practice?

 

RO: I think so, and it's helping that people are buying bigger screens. I think one of the problems was that when people had small screens, letterboxing was really difficult to watch. Also, we've never shown a colorized movie. That's kind of gone away but it was very prominent when we started. A lot of younger people are now beginning to appreciate black and white films.

 

CR: I've always been against colorization, but Sony recently sent Cinema Retro these new DVDs of Ray Harryhausen's films. They present the movie in black and white and in a new colorization process that I have to admit looks fantastic. What do you think of colorization when a director like Harryhausen approves it and says its the way he wants the films to be seen?

 

RO: Well, I think DVD is the perfect place for it- especially if it gives you the choice. I saw a Shirley Temple movie that's in the new Ford at Fox boxed set and it presents it in black and white and in sepia tone. I think it's fine to do that, but I think for TCM we should continue to only show films in their original format. You know they shot Seven Brides for Seven Brothers a second time in a flat screen dimension and we don't even show that.

 

CR: Can you assure classic movie lovers that there are no plans to destroy the format of the network as AMC did by inserting commercials and editing films?

 

RO: There are no plans. The people who run the channel are very adamant about it and everybody knows what a great boutique channel this is. But one never, ever knows what changes may happen in the future. One can never write anything in cement about anything in the world. We don't even know there will be a New York City here at the end of the month- we can only hope. But right now, everything is fine and we're making deals for movies until 2014. So nothing is going to happen in the immediate future.

 

CR: Does TCM really listen to viewer requests to show specific movies?

 

RO: They absolutely do. Just write in from our web site at www.tcm.com. They really read those requests and they are very influenced by that.

 

CR: One last question: what is your favorite movie that will be shown during 31 Days of Oscar?

 

RO: Notorious - it's a knock-out and we're showing it on February 23. It's one of my favorite movies of all time - but of course, so is Casablanca, Nashville, The Big Chill - we're showing them all. But Notorious, I have to say, is just dynamite.

 

 

Posted by Cinema Retro in Interviews on Thursday, January 31. 2008

 

This is long after TED T. "sold' his library. So what library is RO talking about?

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*What library is that if none exists?*

 

As explained awhile back by TCMProgrammr, they have films that they have on long-term rental that they call a "library" but they do not own a film library nor do they own the former Turner Film Library.

 

They have to rent all the film they air. The only exception to that is the six RKO "lost and found" films that Merien C. Cooper owned the rights to (as opposed to RKO). TCM cleared the rights and in doing so, retain the rights to those six films.

 

Edited by: lzcutter for clarity

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*"As explained here awhile back by TCMProgrammr..."* - lzcutter

 

Here ya go kiddo -

Posted Five Years Ago Today - but still relevant and true as far as I (or 'lzcutter') know -

 

"How many Films are in the TCM Library?"

 

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/click.jspa?searchID=339160&messageID=7781431

 

"It's a very complicated answer. Ted Turner bought the RKO, MGM pre-1986 and Warner Brothers pre-1948 libraries in the late '80s, which total about 3,500 films. When TCM launched in 1994, that was considered the "Turner library" and that was the basis for the newtork. However, in the late '90s, Turner merged with Warner Brothers, and since then they (Warner) have been the official owners of that collection of libraries. However, TCM does have an agreement with them (Warner) to play films from that library, although it isn't unlimited access in the way that it used to be. In addition, we license films from all of the other studios and independent distrubutors. As it is, about 65% - 70% comes from those 3,500 titles, and the rest come from other sources."

*tcmprogrammr* February 26, 2006

 

If TCM has a "library", it is an ever-evolving one in which some films are added while others are removed for extended periods of time. This is what Robert Osborne was likely referencing. But none of the titles are the exclusive property of TCM - save for the "Lost And Found RKO" titles.

 

Kyle (shut in for the weekend) In Hollywood

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

 

>

> Mark,

>

> I agree that they aren't showing the 1930s films from the former library. My point was that TCM and the other Turner channels do not have an exclusive deal with Warners for the pre-1960 films in the former Turner film library.

 

I know.....bummer though. I loved it when they seemed to have the unbridled ability to air anything in those libraries that Ted Turner purchased in the 80's.

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Markb,

 

Part of that was because the studios had the films on broadcast quality video tape masters. Video was the industry standard from the mid-1960s until the turn of this century when the digital revolution started to take hold.

 

Because of VHS, many films were made available not only to television networks but customers as well because by the mid-1980s, making a broadcast quality master wouldn't break the bank.

 

Today, with the movement towards preservation, many films that once had been on television are still waiting to for their opportunity to migrate to digital.

 

Because of the economy, the manufactured-on-demand films often go forgo restoration but thankfully, digital masters are being made.

 

But given the size of studio film libraries, it will take awhile.

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Again....... Congrats on 10,000 posts.

 

That is quite an achievement.

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LZ,

There is that too...thanks for delineating it.

 

I am not a fan of it, but it is what it is! And here is to the accelerated digital conversion of old films!!

 

All I know is that TCM is the ONLY channel to air silent films, to air films from the 30's and 40's. No one else does that anymore, period.

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*Again....... Congrats on 10,000 posts.*

 

*That is quite an achievement.*

 

Rey,

 

Thanks! I had no idea I had hit that milestone.

 

Guess that's what comes of being here for so long!

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The other thing I'm not 100% about also is why TCM airs post-1950 Warner Bros. films on a very limited basis. If the Turner library is now incorporated into the post-1950 Warner film library, and TCM has to license the films from Warners, then why do the post-1950 WB titles air very seldomly?

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*"Older films make up the *bulk of our library* and are the *strength of our library*, but we bring in new films to keep the schedule fresh."*

 

*"the extensive library that we have"*

 

Kyle and Rey,

 

I don't know if you both read the whole interview I copied, but in case you didn't here are the few quotes from ROBERT OSBORNE that make the case for those who believe that a tcm library exists.

Sorry to disagree with you two, but there is a definite contradiction between what the tcmprogrammer and Robert Osborne are saying. When ROBERT OSBORNE, TCM's public relations expert, who I know you both love and respect, makes comments about an EXTENSIVE library, emphasis on OUR LIBRARY and WE HAVE. It tends to create a belief that such a library exists, hence all the folks that keep making comments on these boards about TCM's vast library. I don't know about you two, but the word extensive does sound to me like something pretty HUGE, not just a few RKO lost and found titles, OR "an ever-evolving one" which means exactly what? Now, I don't know who the TCMPROGRAMMER is, but his quote is from 2006, Robert Osborne's is from 2008, unless they are both living on two different planets working for two different entity's called TCM, someone is FOS, you can take your pick.

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*Now, I don't know who the TCMPROGRAMMER is, but his quote is from 2006, Robert Osborne's is from 2008, unless they are both living on two different planets working for two different entity's called TCM, someone is FOS, you can take your pick.*

 

TCMProgrammr is the VP of Programming for TCM and works closely with Robert O. on this planet and has for over ten years.

 

He is in charge of the day to day, month to month programming for the channel. He is the one who, perhaps more than anyone, knows the details of the rental library at any given time.

 

He posts here periodically about problems with prints and other issues that arise.

 

http://tinyurl.com/46x98eb

 

But, as always, you may choose to disagree.

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> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}

> *"Older films make up the *bulk of our library* and are the *strength of our library*, but we bring in new films to keep the schedule fresh."*

>

> *"the extensive library that we have"*

 

 

See the word ?libraries?, plural, in the last sentence of the press release below.

 

I think the term ?the TCM film library? is an illusion. I think now it?s actually the ?libraries? TCM rents films from, and these ?libraries? now represent ?the TCM library?. But I suspect there is no big film vault owned by TCM anywhere in Atlanta.

 

See this:

 

http://www.scpr.org/programs/offramp/2010/04/17/ben-mankiewicz-tcms-weekend-host-and-guide-to-tcm-/

 

?Here's the news release from TCM...

 

MEDIA ALERT

 

Turner Classic Movies Invites Fans to Join Network in Hollywood April 22-25 for First-Ever TCM Classic Film Festival

 

WHAT: Turner Classic Movies (TCM), the authority in classic film, will stage the network?s first film festival in the heart of Hollywood.

 

Kicking off the four-day event will be the world premiere of a stunning new restoration of George Cukor?s A Star is Born (1954). Other important presentations include Metropolis (1927), featuring previously lost footage; a 50th anniversary screening of a restored version of Jean Luc Godard?s Breathless (1959); a special screening of the 70mm road show version of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968); and The Producers (1968), including a discussion with writer/director Mel Brooks, who will also be receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame during the festival.

 

WHO: Robert Osborne, TCM?s primetime host, will be the official host of the festival. All screenings ? more than 50 in all ? will include special introductions to provide context about each film. Among the numerous talents slated to attend and talk about their work are Mel Brooks, Luise Rainer, Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, Jon Voight, Martin Landau, Buck Henry, Peter Bogdanovich, Norman Lloyd, Susan Kohner Weitz, Juanita Moore, director Richard Rush and special effects artist Douglas Trumbull, with more to be announced over the next several weeks. In addition, TCM weekend-daytime host Ben Mankiewicz will take part in introducing films during the festival.

 

WHERE: Grauman?s Chinese Theatre and the Egyptian Theatre, Hollywood, California

 

WHEN: April 22-25, 2010

 

WHY: The network is inviting fans from around the country to join this new festival and share their passion for great movies at the TCM Classic Film Festival. This landmark celebration of the history of Hollywood and its movies will be presented in a way that only TCM can, with major events, celebrity appearances, panel discussions and more. The four-day festival will also provide movie fans a rare opportunity to experience some of cinema?s greatest works as they were meant to be seen ? on the big screen.

 

Turner Classic Movies is a Peabody Award-winning network celebrating 15 years of presenting great films, uncut and commercial-free, from the largest film libraries in the world. Currently seen in more than 80 million homes.?

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*"...unless they are both living on two different planets working for two different entity's called TCM, someone is FOS."*

 

If you define "library" as films that TCM owns, it is miniscule. If you define "library" as films that TCM has access to in any given month, it is quite large. That large "library" would include titles from the original "Turner Library" and films from other sources - such as the Hitchcock titles controlled by Universal. When TCM has licensed those films, they would be considered as part of TCM's "library". But there is no longer a "permanent" TCM library.

 

What's so difficult about that?

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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infinite1: Thanks for posting the Cinema Retro interview with Robert Osborne. This is the Golden Age of TCM with Robert Osborne.

 

It's going to be a sad day when he retires.

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