cigarjoe

Recently watched Noir

633 posts in this topic

*Please Murder Me* (1956) is a nice cheapie little noir with Angela Lansbury as the hot blonde that goes on trial for murder. The first half is rather slow but once the trial is over we learn what tricks Angela has been playing. Raymond Burr is the attorney that falls for her, in more ways than one.

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That Raymond! I didn't realize he had such a pre-Perry Mason history in the courtroom. Smashing an oar in A PLACE IN THE SUN. Now this. Never a favorite, I would have been OK had another actor played Perry. My mom was a fan of the books. When she heard Burr had been cast for the show, she thought, "UM...Really!"

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Really dig that little noir, PLEASE MURDER ME! I happen to love Raymond Burr, so this one is a natural for me! Not one of his better noir's, but still a fun watch! Have this one on one of the cheapie PD collections that I treasure!

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For sure, the quality of the print can make a tremendous difference to one's enjoyment of a film. Fuzzy visuals and blurry dialogue could probably affect even *Double Indemnity.*

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*The Man From Cairo* (1953) Directed by Edoardo Anton and Ray Enright with George Raft, Gianna Maria Canale, Leonardo Scavino, Alfredo Varelli, Mino Doro, Massimo Serato, and Richard McNamara. A US, Italian, English noir, Mike Canelli (Raft), the man from Cairo, is passing through Algiers and in a case of mistaken identity is taken for an American PI that the French Gov sends to solve a mystery of war-time theft of $100,000,000 national gold buried somewhere in the nearby desert. Everyone involved assumes he's working for the French government through a mole in the national security apparatus. Canale is a big gal she's no waif but she is shapely. It could have used a bit more outside locations or more varied and interesting sets, as it is it seems way too studio bound and the studio sets all blend into the same look along with the actors, no real standouts opposite Raft, too bad the premise was good. A nice finale with a steam engine and a final denouement on a train. 6/10

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I dug THE MAN FROM CAIRO, which I'm fortunate to have on a "Forgotten Noir" collection! I always love Raft, no matter what, and this was a pretty decent flick.

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THE PROWLER, a slow starter from Joseph Losey that snowballs effectively and becomes quite good. Van Heflin is a crooked cop who harasses Evelyn Keyes. This happens. That happens. It all begins to unravel. You know the rest!

 

If you find the first half silly and routine, stick with it. As Van becomes more and more desperate, we have more fun!

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I've noticed the library has BLACK ANGEL. I'll probably walk out with that today. It's not a great movie. But it's one I've ONLY seen once or twice! And I like the book by Cornell Woolrich.

 

There's a library employee who likes classic movies, especially noir. I suspect he's the one responsible for the excellent acquisitions of late. Not bad for a twenty-five year-old kid!

 

 

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Speaking of angels and noir, I'm dying to see *Fallen Angel*. (Otto Preminger ! Dana Andrews ! Linda Darnell ! ) It seems to be one of those rare elusive films that are hardly ever available.

Anyone know why? I would sell my first-born child to see it (how would that be arranged, I wonder? )

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I'm pretty sure TCM showed it, last summer, IIRC. Perhaps it wasn't on the Cannuckian schedule? :)

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>>Speaking of angels and noir, I'm dying to see *Fallen Angel*. (Otto Preminger ! Dana Andrews ! Linda Darnell ! ) It seems to be one of those rare elusive films that are hardly ever available.

Anyone know why? I would sell my first-born child to see it (how would that be arranged, I wonder? )

 

I've seen it several times on The Fox Movie Channel. I was tremendously disappointed having heard good things about it for so many years. I could not go into detail without spoiling it for anyone who hasn't seen it. Still, I tried viewing it three times in total over about two years. A year ago Time-Warner cable put FMC on another tier and I don't feel like paying extra for the few classics that the channel puts on in the morning. If I were a big fan of PORKY'S I might have gone for it, that's about as old as they get in prime time over there.

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If you don't mind "ten minute takes" it's available on You Tube in a pretty

decent print.

 

Never eat at a restaurant called Mom's, or drink at a joint called Pop's.

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*Check the schedule on Aug 27 at 5pm central time.*

Yes it's part of the Linda Darnell SUTS . . . finally Hooray! Along with FMC showing it, it's also available on DVD, as part of the Fox Film Noir series.

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*T Men* (1947) Dir by Anthony Mann, with Charles McGraw, Dennis O'Keefe, Mary Meade, Alfred Ryder, Wallace Ford, and June Lockhart. The story is basically two Treasury agents O'Brien (O'Keef) and Genaro Ryder) infiltrate a counterfeiting ring with good paper using their raided plates as the bait. Its a good procedural type of Noir, nothing outstanding and yet nothing bad about it either, I'll give it a 7/10.

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T-MEN, HE WALKED BY NIGHT, NAKED CITY. Fine movies with a common thread. Some are better than others, but they're all good films.

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In a similiar way, one film I just recently watched again (HBO/Cinemax have played it a lot) was *Public Enemies*. I think it is truly an excellent film in all ways. Every so often someone makes a new film that shows me that we can still have quality films made today, if someone will take the time and effort to do so.

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You got to be kidding us, Public Enemies was a horrible film, the constant shaky cam and the poor sound made it unberable.

 

Besides that there was ZERO feel of the Depression and not much character development. Watch Dillinger 1973 to see how it should have been made, how they used to know how to make a film.

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DILLINGER is better. But I found the recent film interesting and exciting. I was bothered not at all by sound or photography, and didn't feel it was particularly lacking in atmosphere. Not one of the great crime films of all time, but I liked it.

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*Dillinger ...*
is way better, there was no need for THAT much handheld camera in PE. For me I wish they would create a rating system that would let you know how much of a film contained it, I'd avoid them like the plague, lol. I'd rather not spend money and reward that trend in film, I'd say ditto for the 3D trend.

I also caught on TCM today but I've seen them before

*Desperate* (1947 mostly the end
*The Black Book* (1949) most, a Noir French Revolution "Terror"
*Border Incident* (1949) most (excellent) BTY

And

*House of Strangers* (1949) Director Joseph L. Mankiewicz, with Richard Conte, Susan Hayward, Edward G. Robinson, Luther Adler, Paul Valentine, and Efrem Zimbalist Jr.

Didn't know what to expect from this Noir, since I'd never heard of it. It was actually a quite good family drama Noir, with a story told mostly in flashback about an Italian patriarch with four sons who originally ran a barbershop and parlayed that into a money lending bank on NYC'sLower East Side. With the passage of new banking laws the Monetti bank is in trouble and lawyer son Conte ends up in jail doing seven years for trying to bribe a juror while the other three brothers reopen the bank and cut out the old man. Robinson is quite convincing as Monetti.

Conte is almost consumed with hate while in prison but love interest Hayward is the antidote and is very good in this film playing a high-class dame and they mutually fall in love at first sight. A nicely done denouement that keeps you guessing. No big set pieces or outstanding action sequences but above average. 8.5/10

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The Tall Target(1951) directed by Anthony Mann a very noirish film about an attempt to assassinate President elect Abraham Lincoln on his journey to Washington DC. The film stars, Dick Powell, Paula Raymond, Adolphe Menjou, Marshall Thompson, Ruby Dee, Richard Rober, Leif Erickson, and Will Geer. All the action takes place on the train journey between New York City (probably actually Weehawken NJ) and Washington DC. Dick Powell plays a discredited NYC detective tries in the face of disbelief to foil the assassins, who hate the President's policies. Paula Raymond a Southern Belle ,married to West pointer Marshall Thompson, with Ruby Dee as her maid. Menjou plays a Poughkeepsie militia colonel riding on the train. The film keeps you guessing who is involved with the plot and who is not. This will remind those who are familiar with Film Noir of "The Narrow Margin". This film is very well done and I can't believe it isn't more well known, A gem from Mann 10/10

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I'd love to see this. Never heard of it till recently. Especially after the book I just read. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, VAMPIRE HUNTER! I am not kidding.

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