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tmsenzig

Favorite CHRISTMAS CAROL film

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Just to clarify, my post below is about the very old 1935 British version of A Christmas Carol, simply entitled SCROOGE.

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My favorite Christmas Carol film is the one with Alister Simm (Sorry if my spelling is wrong) I find it absolutlely chilling and very touching. Must see the B/W not the colorized version.

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allie--I don't know if you read my post way on down the thread but that's my favorite too because of the great songs in it. That's what kids TV should be all about (although my friend's kids were totally bored by it--go figure.)

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I love most versions, but the 1951 version with Alistair Sim is the one that first hooked me. Second, I rate Albert Finney's "Scrooge" musical for its fantastic lyrics. Third, my wife's favorite, Reginald Owen from 1938.

 

The Muppet's Christmas Carol is one of the most humorous, along with Bill Murray's "Scrooged." Another animated version not mentioned here is "The Stingiest Man in Town" with the voices of Walter Matthau and Tom Bosley.

 

George C. Scott is good as Scrooge, but he seems almost too affluent for a miser. I rate his version about the same as Patrick Stewart's. Sir Seymour Hicks is very good and I think Donald Calthrop captures the essence of Bob Cratchit, however most versions available are so poor that I lose some of the enjoyment of watching.

 

One of my favorite TV versions stars Frederick March as Scrooge and Basil Rathbone as Marley. It was on a program called "Shower of Stars" (I think) and was sponsored by Chrysler. I also enjoyed Rich Little's Christmas Carol where he played all of the parts ranging from W.C. Fields as Scrooge, Paul Lynde as Cratchit, Truman Capote as Tiny Tim, Jimmy Stewart as Dick Wilkins to Groucho Marx as Fezziwig.

 

Above all, avoid Kelsey Grammar's unwatchable version that was made for TV a couple of years ago.

 

Henry Winkler's "An American Christmas Carol" was good, but I like to keep the story in the original English setting. That leaves out Palance's Western "Ebenezer" and the female version, "Ebbie."

 

I do have one animated version that is completely strange that has a unibrow Scrooge and my favorite line from Tiny Tim to his father at the dinner table when the turkey is presented for all - "Cut that sucker, Dad!"

 

Overall, it's the story of redemption that keeps this immortal classic alive and in one version or another a holiday favorite for almost everyone.

 

CharlieT

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George C. Scott is good as Scrooge, but he seems almost too affluent for a miser.

 

What's the point of being a miser if you're not going to be affluent as a result? Seems like a lot of trouble to go to, otherwise...

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Alistair Sim.

 

 

I do have to agree with whoever said they enjoy The Muppets Christmas Carol with Michael Caine. I think that movie is great fun and our family watches it every year. :D

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True misers refuse to spend even on themselves. Scenes in many versions take the time to make that point. In the 1951 version, Sim turns down more bread he requests because it will cost him a "ha' penny extra." Scrooge does little or nothing to make his life more comfortable at home or at work because it is cheaper. Even the 1938 version loses some credibility when Gene Lockhart's Cratchit has to pay Owen's Scrooge for his hat that is ruined by the passing coach. There's no way Charles Dickens' Ebenezer Scrooge would pay as much for a hat as he paid Bob Cratchit for a week's work. True misers tend to live a life closer to abject poverty than affluence.

 

CharlieT

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