Sign in to follow this  
MishaK

Russian / Soviet films

8 posts in this topic

Hello!

 

There are many very good Russian and Soviet made classic movies - it would be great to see a few on TCM... heres a few I would like to see:

 

"An Office Romance" - Comedy - very good!

"The Dawns Here are Quiet" WW2 (Nominated for Oscar in 1972)

"Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears" - Drama

 

There are many others - Russian films do not receive the attention they deserve in the West, and i think the TCM audience would appreciate these and other films. : )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrei Rublev

The Cranes are Flying

Stalker

Ivan the Terrible Parts One and Two

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

War and Peace

Ivan's Childhood

The Ascent

 

 

I'd love to see all these films on TCM at some point and agree that Russian films are overlooked. In general, foreign films seem to imply Italian or French cinema. However, there's a lot more to it than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think TCM has shown a couple of Eisenstein films, and nothing more. I agree, I'd like to see more Russian cinema.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love a lot of the Soyuzmultfilm animation, which deserves its own TCM spotlight. This was the great Russian counterpart to Disney, launched with great fanfare in 1936. Of course, Soviet animation stretched back a good two and half decades farther back, most notably the Wladyslaw Starewicz stop-motion material of the early teens.

Throughout the thirties, a handful of smaller cartoon units made some of their films in color, well ahead of the live-action films. Prime examples being some of the Mosfilm stop-motion that Aleksandr Ptsuhko supervised such as this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j749owvbfPY

Many of the early efforts of Soyuzmultfilm were in black & white: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2U1V9x0Bm7A

Since Technicolor was hard to acquire from the west, most color cartoons were done in various experimental processes until all of the captured German Ufacolor was adapted for Soviet use. Then virtually everything Soyuzmultfilm put out was in color, like this 1945 winter fantasy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIGxDpQPYsc

In the late forties, the Disneyification process was complete and many of these cartoons did become rather predictable for the next 15 years or so. The full length features were pumped out almost annually after 1947 (alongside the great many 20+ minute shorts) and a couple like THE SNOW QUEEN were hits in the United States by the later fifties as well. Unfortunately, due to the Stalin influence, so much animation in the fifties both while he was alive and long after he croaked tended to be devoid of any sense of humor. This is a rare comedy cartoon from 1955: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mE7Hpfjj9g

Then in the early sixties the UPA and Zagreb influence finally took over and you had this "golden age" that lasted through the 1980s when Soviet animation displayed so much creativity. A sampling of my favorites...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTRlvm8LhnE

An earlier version of RIKKI TIKKI TAVY predating the U.S. Chuck Jones version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ar-lv03ElXI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLwk7VcbbVM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0V6CEsYExA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8rVp9rwaS0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7OQuzYfVJ4

Also one that isn't from that studio, but a good contemporary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZL8jyYbGXME

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I linked this one above, but I think it deserves further study. Released in 1983, it suggests a restlessness among the Soviet people to end the Cold War a full six years before the Berlin wall came down. The lion and the ox represent two powerful nations that are uneasy allies easily influenced by lesser nations and situations that agitate, represented by the jackal. Ultimately both leading animals (spoiler alert) succumb to all of the agitation until we end with a large acacia tree shown in the final shot. Is its shape symbolizing an atomic blast? It is interesting to note that 1983 resembled 1962 and 2017 with nuclear war a real possibility, not just in TV movies like THE DAY AFTER, but also in reality: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1983_Soviet_nuclear_false_alarm_incident

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us