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Mabel Albertson

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Tatum talked about her mother in her book. She did have a lot of problems. Very sad. The kids wound up being taken from her due to the bad living conditions they were living in. But her dad wasnt much better as a parent either............All the kids wound up messed up.......

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Why stay in Mayberry when you can move to the big city of Mt. Pilot?

I didn't mind Aneta that much. She could be a pain, but after a while you

got used to it. For whatever reason, Andy seemed to click with her. I

didn't see The Blob this time, but it's a better movie than the name implies.

Still not something you'd brag about on a resume.

 

I found out that Joanna Moore was born in the same small town in Georgia

where I lived for a number of years. I don't remember any mention being made

of it, but I might have forgotten. That was certainly a dysfunctional family from

all sides. I believe Tatum ended up supporting her mother. She was just on

Nightline a little while ago, has a book coming out or something, and seems

to be doing pretty well.

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LOL. Yeah, Mt. Pilot seemed to be swinging! I dont think they ever showed it though. I remember in Tatum's book, her mother lost several fingers. I cant remember how now. I think she sobered up in later life, but her health was bad and she died relatively young. Too bad. She was a good actress in the tv roles I saw her in. And pretty. I liked her accent too....

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>Hibi wrote:

>I liked both Joanna Moore and Elinor Donahue on the show. Not a big fan of Aneta. Part of it was the writing. She was a first class b-. Then they glammed her up and I liked her even less.....The pay was probably too low and the doctors/pharmacists left for greener pastures (LOL) They did go through a lot of them........Speaking of Aneta, her big screen claim to fame, THE BLOB was on Thurs night

 

I agree with you about Helen being a first class b-! I liked Joanna Moore and Elinor Donahue best.

 

I was telling someone once about all Helen's manipulations against Andy, and he cut me off and said, "She was a b-." I guess I'm not the only one who didn't care for her character. I'm sure the actress was a nice person.

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>As you noted about Andy's remark about Howard and his mother's apron strings-very little slack, the same could be said about Howard and his wallet. Very little space for an opening. Let's splurge-have two pats of butter. And after Andy and Helen had gone along, Millie went ahead and ordered the works, probably costing more than the other three combined. Not a good sign. I also got a kick out of Howard's feathered hat-just what the premature nerd around town needs.

 

I think Millie ordered the lobster and champagne, or something like that. :-)

 

>From the episode about Helen trying to fix up Howard with Miss Fairchild came the minor revelation that Howard left his undershirt in his old office and forgot about it. Most un-Sprague like. Thank goodness Mama wasn't there to see that. That might have given her a real headache.

 

I also thought this was very un-Howard like. He said it took it off on warm day, but he seems the type who would never break a sweat, even in the dead heat of summer.

 

>I didn't remember that Andy had that second escargot incident with Darlene Mason. I thought it might have been with the pretty lady lawyer from Raleigh, who sent Helen into a ballistic jealousy fit, perhaps somewhat understandably in this case.

 

I don't know if it was understandable or not. Presumably she got jealous because he covered it up, but she and Thelma Lou acted just as angry when Andy and Barney tried to be up front about things (which they usually didn't, apparently with good reason). So I can understand Andy being nervous about an overreaction by "Miss B-."

 

BTW, I believe the lawyer in Raleigh was played by Whitney Blake, who was the mother on Hazel. I do think the lawyer was being a little too forward, but not enough for Helen to pitch one of her usual fits.

 

>I've read a bit about Joanna Moore's problems with alcohol and drugs, but don't remember the details. Just like the movies, there are usually at least two or more versions of everything in TV too. I thought she was the prettiest of Andy's girlfriends, and had a very charming personality, though those white gloves have gone the way of names like Cornelia. For whatever reason, Ellie never appealed to me much, so I didn't miss her after her early exit.

 

I thought Peggy and Ellie were both beautiful, charmingly, and friendly. Helen--not so much.

 

>Mrs. Rayburn had been around long enough to know all the tricks. I think Diane Brewster only played Miss Canfield for the first season, before she was replaced by Sue Randall as Miss Landers. Yes, Miss Landers. Every once in a while I'll spot Sue Randall as a guest star on a TV show from the period.

 

Yeah, I knew Landers replaced Canfield, but I wasn't sure which season the episode was in. As I said in a previous post within this thread, Principal Rayburn took over as teacher after both Canfield and Landers disappeared. It was Miss Canfield that Mrs. Rayburn was joking with, as the episode with the note was the first episode in the first season, "Beaver Gets 'Spelled." Also, the actress who played Miss Canfield played a secretary in the original Leave It to Beaver pilot. She was a secretary for the milk bottle company. Richard Deacon played her boss, although he would play Fred Rutherford in the series' regular run. There were also different actors for Ward and Wally. The actor for Ward was particularly bad in that performance; I'm glad Hugh Beaumont took over the role in the regular run.

 

Robbie

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LOL. Were those 2 blonde bimbos from Mt. Pilot? They would breeze into town occasionally and cause all kinds of problems for Barney and Andy (with Miss B- and Thelma Lou) Joyce Jameson played one of them. They were very funny..........Was it ever mentioned what sort of occupation Thelma Lou had? I dont remember it ever coming up, but I dont remember. She lived in a house so she must have had some income coming in, being single.......

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That's very odd that Mabel wasnt in that "marriage" episode. I wonder why? She would've added a lot more laughs. Maybe she was busy filming some other project. I do think that female lawyer WAS Whitney Blake. And she conducted business by her pool in her bikini! LOL. Forward, indeed! I cant really blame Miss B- for getting steamed about that one........What trivia one remembers!

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OMG! I didnt realize Aneta Corsaut was dead! And has been dead for some time (1995) I never read anything about it!

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I'll come to the defense of Helen just a little bit. No doubt she was

manipulative and had a very obvious green-eyed monster problem,

but her general facade was usually nice so that it didn't seem all that

bad. I have the same problem with some old movie stars. I can't

remember if they are still alive or not. I did know Aneta Corsaut

had passed on, though I didn't remember when. It has been quite

a while.

 

The fun girls were from Mt. Pilot. Jean Carson played the other girl,

the one with the deep voice who usually greeted Andy with a sultry

Hi doll. When they were in town you knew Andy and "Burney" would

get into trouble with their girls. In one episode Andy and Barney met

them in a restaurant which I think was in Mt. Pilot. A boyfriend came

by and Andy ended up with a black eye. Some fun.

 

I'm pretty sure that was Whitney Blake as the pretty lady lawyer.

Now that's my idea of legal counsel. Didn't she also go on to be a

TV producer? When Andy got back from the trip with that sunburn,

good old Howard steps up and mentions that the sun would be behind

Andy on the trip from Raleigh so his face shouldn't be sunburned.

Thanks a lot, buddy.

 

 

I don't know exactly where the Howard almost got married episode

occurred during the series. It may have been after Mabel Albertson

was through playing Mrs. Sprague or else she was busy doing something

else and she couldn't come back. It was rather funny that Mrs. Sprague

was the one who ended up getting married.

 

I believe TV Land showed the pilot for Beaver a number of years ago.

If I remember correctly, Casey Adams played the role of Ward.

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I'll come to the defense of Helen just a little bit. No doubt she was manipulative and had a very obvious green-eyed monster problem, but her general facade was usually nice so that it didn't seem all that bad. I have the same problem with some old movie stars. I can't remember if they are still alive or not. I did know Aneta Corsaut had passed on, though I didn't remember when. It has been quite a while.

 

I knew Aneta Corsaut had been dead for a long time. She did appear on Matlock, though, as did Betty Lynn. Betty Lynn played Matlock's secretary in some early episodes.

 

I didn't think Aneta Corsaut was all that attractive, especially in the color episodes. Her lipstick was too severe, for one thing. I thought she was more attractive in the B&W episodes. I don't know if this was because she had a different look then (in the first color episode in which Barney visits from Raleigh, he remarks to Andy that Helen had changed her hair), or that B&W made her makeup look less severe.

 

>The fun girls were from Mt. Pilot. Jean Carson played the other girl, the one with the deep voice who usually greeted Andy with a sultry Hi doll. When they were in town you knew Andy and "Burney" would get into trouble with their girls. In one episode Andy and Barney met them in a restaurant which I think was in Mt. Pilot. A boyfriend came by and Andy ended up with a black eye. Some fun.

 

The deep-voiced one (Daphne) always said, "Hello doll," and batted her eyes at Andy. Although the first thing she ever said was, "Let's go over to the Gigolo Club in Yancey; I hear they have a floor show there." The episode in the Mount Pilot restaurant is the first one in which they appeared. At that time Andy was still dating Peggy but they had had a fight. The boyfriend's name was Al. Daphne says she could have stayed home and watched that George Raft picture on television. Barney gets Andy there on the pretense that the restaurant is serving liquor illegally. In the barbershop quartet episode, Mount Pilot has its own sheriff, so why would Andy be investigating that? And in no other episode was it every mentioned that Andy needed to investigate anything in Mount Pilot, so this seemed to be a continuity problem.

 

The actress who played Daphne also played of the three escaped female convicts. Likewise, Reta Shaw (Aunt Hagatha from Bewitched ) played one of the three escaped convicts, but also played Barney's voice teacher, Eleanora Poultice. They reused actors a lot on the show. Allan Melvin probably guest-starred the most, usually as heavies, although occasionally as good guys (the army recruiter who rejected Ernest T. Bass, the house detective at the hotel in Raleigh, and I think he played a law officer once or twice). He also played a bully in two episodes: once, an employee at Foley's grocery store who is bullying Barney because he got a ticket for sweeping trash in the street, and again as an ex-boyfriend of Millie's who is bullying Howard. In both episodes, some trickery involving martial arts is used to scare away the bullies, although in somewhat different ways, since the first involved Barney's teacher pretending to be Barney, while in the latter episode, Howard pretends to know some martial arts. It is interesting they not only reused plots which were so similar, but also reused the same actor to play the bad guy.

 

>I'm pretty sure that was Whitney Blake as the pretty lady lawyer.

 

It was.

 

>I don't know exactly where the Howard almost got married episode occurred during the series. It may have been after Mabel Albertson was through playing Mrs. Sprague or else she was busy doing something else and she couldn't come back. It was rather funny that Mrs. Sprague was the one who ended up getting married.

 

As I said earlier in this thread, the episode in which Howard was going to get married occurred well before the episode in which his mother gets married. So Mabel Albertson was not through playing Mrs. Sprague, and Mrs. Sprague had not moved to Raleigh at that point.

 

The Mrs. Sprague wedding was rather sudden; it reminded me of Barney's landlady falling for the con man and planning to get married very quickly. Such hasty action didn't seem consistent with Mrs. Sprague's character. And she was actually able to move away from Howard and let loose the apron strings? Hard to believe.

 

>I believe TV Land showed the pilot for Beaver a number of years ago. If I remember correctly, Casey Adams played the role of Ward.

 

TV Land did air the original Leave It to Beaver pilot, as that's where I first saw it. I believe it was part of a TV Land marathon to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the show. The original pilot is also on the DVD release. Casey Adams did a terrible acting job as Ward. Barbara Billingsley and Jerry Mathers were the only actors from the original pilot to play their same roles in the regular run of the TV series. However, Diane Brewster and Richard Deacon were in the original pilot, but as different characters than they would play in the regular run.

 

Robbie

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>Hibi wrote:

>LOL. Were those 2 blonde bimbos from Mt. Pilot? They would breeze into town occasionally and cause all kinds of problems for Barney and Andy (with Miss B- and Thelma Lou) Joyce Jameson played one of them. They were very funny..........Was it ever mentioned what sort of occupation Thelma Lou had? I dont remember it ever coming up, but I dont remember. She lived in a house so she must have had some income coming in, being single.......

 

Thelma Lou said in one episode that she had to get back to the office, but they never said what kind. She seemed to be doing very well, being single and renting or owning her own home. I also thought Thelma Lou was a lot more attractive than Helen. She sure had a lot of friends and relatives she was trying to set everyone up with. Mary Grace Canfield (and her character's name was Mary Grace) for Gomer, the conversational dead weight Lydia Crosswaithe for Andy (and later Goober became interested in Lydia), her skeet-shooting cousin Karen for Andy.

 

Betty Lynn, who played Thelma Lou, now lives in Mount Airy, NC, Andy Griffith's hometown and what many believe is the basis for Mayberry, although Andy Griffith continue to deny this. Frances Bavier, who played Aunt Bee, also moved to Siler City, NC (mentioned sometimes, although not as often as Mount Pilot, on the show) in her later years, spending the remainder of her life there.

 

In one of the later episodes with the fun girls, after Andy and Barney have explained to Miss B-. and Thelma Lou that they couldn't seem to shake off the fun girls, they all go to Andy's house before a dance. Aunt Bee tries to warn Andy but before she can, the fun girls come out of the kitchen whooping it up. Helen and Thelma Lou stalk out in a huff. So did Helen and Thelma Lou think Andy and Barney invited the fun girls to his house and then would willingly bring Helen and Thelma Lou there? It seems to me at this point the presence of the fun girls at Andy's house would confirm the boys' story that the girls were being pushy and they couldn't seem get rid of them. Helen and Thelma Lou should have realized Andy and Barney were being too "gentlemanly," and they should have given the fun girls the heave-ho themselves. I guess Miss B-. and Thelma Lou were angry that the guys were being too wimpy although it certainly worked to their advantage when they wanted to walk all over them.

 

The fun girls appeared in three episodes. In the first, Andy was still dating Peggy; in the last two, he was dating Helen. Interestingly, in the first one, the tag (the part of the episode at the end before the closing credits) in which Barney accidentally spills the beans to Peggy about the fun girls while she is treating Andy's eye, is shown on TV Land, but is not included in the episode on the DVD set! Incredible.

 

I loved how Skippy kept calling Barney "Burney" and then when the guys try to get rid of them, the girls get mad and Skippy says, "Oh, shut up, Burney, just SHUT UP!" After the girls leave, Barney starts trying to blame Andy for the mess ("You know where you went wrong...") and Andy says, "Me?" and as he tries to explain it's not his fault, Barney keeps on blaming him and finally Andy interrupts and says, "Oh, shut up, Burney, just SHUT UP!"

 

In one of the episodes with the fun girls, Thelma Lou tells Barney if he'll just be honest with her, she'll believe him. So he tries to be honest, and she says, "That's a lie!" Given this behavior, it's understandable Andy and Barney were reluctant to tell Helen and/or Thelma Lou about the fun girls, the woman lawyer in Raleigh, or any other attractive woman they pass within 100 feet of.

 

Robbie

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It's possible Mabel was busy doing her Bewitched role, she was playing that part around the same time (Howard's near-marriage episode) Who knows? Odd, though. I did hear about Frances Bavier dying but not Aneta. I feel bad now trashing her character. She wasnt that old. Too bad. I never saw her in anything else after they married and the show ended..........

 

I loved those girls! (Hi, doll!) Joyce had that really awful laugh........

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Yes, they did reuse actors a lot. I noticed that in the orignal run. I loved that female convict episode too. The Barney shows were classic. The show lost something when he left............

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LOL. I thought they were on more than that. Maybe it just seems like it. There was that one episode (maybe it's one already mentioned) Where the boys tell the girls they have to work late at the office, and the girls are walking by after seeing a movie and hear the girls whooping it up in there. Needless to say, there were NOT pleased!

 

I didnt know there was actually a Siler City!

 

While we're on the subject, why did Jack Burns leave the show? Was he unhappy or was he just let go? I enjoyed his character (though not as much as Barney). I dont think he ever appeared on any reunion episodes. Wonder if there was some bad blood there? After that Andy went solo with no deputy.........

 

Edited by: Hibi on Jul 7, 2011 10:39 AM

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I guess just about every TV show has had continuity problems.

Probably two of the best known ones on Andy were that in the

first few episodes Barney was Andy's cousin. That was dropped

very quickly. And Clara's last name was Johnson and then Edwards

with no husband in sight. They are fun to notice. On one episode

there was a schedule on the railway station that read Ashville. Of

course it's spelled Asheville. I'm surprised Andy didn't catch that

one.

 

 

Both Barney and Howard were lucky that Allan Melvin turned out

to be a coward. In the second instance, Howard tried the same

thing later with a customer who was bothering Millie and the guy

gave him a punch in the stomach which doubled over Howie. As

Andy explained, It doesn't work all the time.

 

 

 

I think Helen looked better in the bw episodes with longer hair. She

seemed to have that short haircut for a heck of a long time.

 

 

 

Though he was nowhere as bad as Helen, Andy could be jealous too.

There was the episode where the school curriculum director, who had

about five advanced degrees, showed Opie how to throw a curve ball,

and really was a know everything, was visiting and had to work late

with Helen, thus messing up Andy's date with her. Then it was Andy's

turn to have a fit with his remark Do you want to run with him or do

you want to run with me. I think Charles Aidman played the role.

 

 

 

Yes it didn't take much for Helen and Thelma Lou to get huffy. That

was probably part of the plot mechanics, so that anytime a woman

showed any interest in Andy or Barney, there was a built-in reaction.

Thelma Lou did have a cozy little house. However she earned her money,

I hope it was legal and above board.

 

 

 

I remember reading that Betty Lynn's house in Mt. Airy has been burglarized

twice. Maybe she have stayed in Cali.

 

 

 

Yeah, how about that Lydia. Her pulse rate must have been in the single

digits. What a wallflower. She made Mary Grace look like a party girl.

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>Hibi wrote:

>LOL. I thought they were on more than that. Maybe it just seems like it. There was that one episode (maybe it's one already mentioned) Where the boys tell the girls they have to work late at the office, and the girls are walking by after seeing a movie and hear the girls whooping it up in there. Needless to say, there were NOT pleased!

 

The first one was the one at the restaurant in Mount Pilot. In the second one, the boys are working late and Barney goes to the diner to pick up dinner, and runs into the fun girls and brings them back to the office. They drive the girls back to Mount Pilot, but as they are getting into the car in front of the courthouse, Helen and Thelma Lou see them as they are leaving the movies.

 

In the third one, they arrest the fun girls for speeding. Andy leaves Barney to watch them while he tries to keep Helen and Thelma Lou busy with a movie and dinner, telling them Barney has to watch over some "prisoners" they booked at night. Helen and Thelma Lou talk Andy into stopping by the courthouse after dinner. Otis has let the fun girls out because they were in "his" cell, and Skippy and Barney keep turning the lights off and on. Andy comes in to try to get things straightened out, the fun girls try to make them dance, and Helen and Thelma Lou come in and catch them "whooping it up." So technically, the "working late" premise and the "whooping it up" incident were in different episodes. But the episodes are so similar it's hard to keep them straight--I just happened to have seem them about a million times on TV Land before it relegated the show to the weekends.

 

>I didnt know there was actually a Siler City!

 

There is also a Pilot Mountain in North Carolina.

 

>While we're on the subject, why did Jack Burns leave the show? Was he unhappy or was he just let go? I enjoyed his character (though not as much as Barney). I dont think he ever appeared on any reunion episodes. Wonder if there was some bad blood there? After that Andy went solo with no deputy.........

 

I heard the character was just dropped because it wasn't popular. No explanation was given on the show, which was strange, considering he was Floyd's nephew. Andy had no deputy except Goober filling in on a few occasions, and once when Goober, Howard, and Emmett all tried to fill in while Andy was sick.

 

It's telling that no permanent deputy was needed after Barney left. Did the crime rate go down in Mayberry after he left? :-)

 

One strange thing about Warren was that he was present when the Taylors left to go to Hollywood, but was strangely absent in the episode where they returned bearing gifts for their friends. He had not left the show at that point, because he was featured in subsequent episodes, but I thought it odd he was not included in the return show since he was in the send-off show.

 

Also interesting is that apparently Thelma Lou went to the same high school as Andy and Barney, since she was in the reunion episode in which Barney returns to Mayberry from Raleigh, but she was strangely absent in the first episode in which they have a high school reunion. In that episode, Barney is already dating Thelma Lou but she is nowhere to be found. Barney is worried about seeing his old high school "love" Ramona Wiley (who doesn't even remember him--she thinks he's the bartender). Her name is also very similar to that of a woman Ernest T. Bass would later be infatuated with. Barney is very down in the dumps at the end about Ramona not remembering him. Maybe Thelma Lou was out of town, but it's strange there's no mention of her at all in the episode. No one asked about her, Barney didn't say, "Well at least I've got o'l Thel"...nothing.

 

Robbie

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I guess just about every TV show has had continuity problems. Probably two of the best known ones on Andy were that in the first few episodes Barney was Andy's cousin. That was dropped very quickly. And Clara's last name was Johnson and then Edwards with no husband in sight. They are fun to notice. On one episode there was a schedule on the railway station that read Ashville. Of course it's spelled Asheville. I'm surprised Andy didn't catch that one.

 

And Clara's name was actually Bertha in the beginning. It went from Bertha Johnson to Clara Johnson to Clara Edwards.

 

Barney was mentioned as being Andy's cousin in the very first episode, and in a few others. Eventually they were just referred to as being friends in high school, and Barney was Opie's godfather. Although they could still have been cousins as well as being friends.

 

The distance from Mayberry to Raleigh kept changing quite a bit, too. It would be much farther if Mayberry is really Mount Airy, but even if this is not the case (as Andy Griffith continues to assert it is not), the distance still kept changing from episode to episode.

 

Every show has continuity problems, but it's fun to analyze them.

 

>Both Barney and Howard were lucky that Allan Melvin turned out to be a coward. In the second instance, Howard tried the same thing later with a customer who was bothering Millie and the guy gave him a punch in the stomach which doubled over Howie. As Andy explained, It doesn't work all the time.

 

I don't think Allan Melvin was a coward in the first one. He got thrown by Barney's martial arts teacher, pretending to be Barney. It was only in the second one that he backed down to Howard.

 

It was strange the guy was clearly harassing Millie and then punched Howard with the sheriff standing right there in plain sight. Even Clyde (Allan Melvin) was afraid to punch Howard while Andy was around.

 

>I think Helen looked better in the bw episodes with longer hair. She seemed to have that short haircut for a heck of a long time.

 

We finally agree on something about Helen! :-)

 

>Though he was nowhere as bad as Helen, Andy could be jealous too. There was the episode where the school curriculum director, who had about five advanced degrees, showed Opie how to throw a curve ball, and really was a know everything, was visiting and had to work late with Helen, thus messing up Andy's date with her. Then it was Andy's turn to have a fit with his remark Do you want to run with him or do you want to run with me. I think Charles Aidman played the role.

 

Again we agree! Andy could be unreasonably jealous, too. The doctor who was working closely with pharmacist Ellie Walker, which led Andy to propose prematurely to Ellie; Peggy's friend who showed up at the last minute when she and Andy were supposed to have a date (this led Barney to make the date with the fun girls in Mount Pilot), and of course, the teacher from Raleigh working with Helen. Andy had some nerve calling it "running with". A vulgar term, as Helen put it.

 

>Yes it didn't take much for Helen and Thelma Lou to get huffy. That was probably part of the plot mechanics, so that anytime a woman showed any interest in Andy or Barney, there was a built-in reaction. Thelma Lou did have a cozy little house. However she earned her money, I hope it was legal and above board.

 

She took over the moonshine business after the Morrison sisters got busted. :-) For celebrations, and special occasions! Sir Walter Raleigh Day, National Potato Week, Panama Canal Day, Bastille Day... From the episode "Alcohol and Old Lace", taken from the movie Arsenic and Old Lace. Thelma would later turn the business over to the Baldwin sisters on The Waltons.

 

Yeah, the women's jealousy was a plot contrivance, much as Darrin Stephens' anti-witchcraft policy on Bewitched was. Dick York used to complain about having Darrin written so that he came home yelling all the time and being bigoted against witches. The writers had decided they needed this as the basic plot device for the series. Still, it's fun to talk about the the disposition of Helen and Thelma Lou.

 

>Yeah, how about that Lydia. Her pulse rate must have been in the single digits. What a wallflower. She made Mary Grace look like a party girl.

 

A conversational dead weight, that Lydia. I knew someone like that once. A friend of mine put it best when he said you had to carry 100% of the conversation with her. People ran when they saw her coming.

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I remember in one of the episodes with Flora, probably the one where

the character was introduced, that at the end Goober came to Andy

and complained that Flora was asking him to marry her. He wasn't

quite ready for that. I think the writers likely didn't pay a whole lot

of attention to the inconsistencies between episodes because they

thought casual viewers wouldn't notice or if they did, it was no big

deal. Now they they've been on the air all these years and there are

books about the series, it's more noticeable.

 

I had forgotten about Emhardt being the Foster's polish man. In the bw

episode Opie was hoping he would stay so Opie could have the chance

to enjoy adventurous sleeping on the ironing board.

 

Wasn't Morrelli's also the location of all the troubles with Howard, Miss Fairchild,

and Andy's "date" with Mrs. Sprague? I know it was often mentioned when the

foursome of Andy, Helen, Barney, and Thelma Lou were thinking of eating out.

I'm guessing that escargot was never on the menu at Morrelli's.

 

I happened to catch an episode today on TV Land and Maude Prickett showed

up as a neighbor when Opie was stuck between practicing the piano or playing

football. Arnold took over until Andy came home and the jig was up. Arnold was

finally good for something.

 

I liked Otis too, especially during the many times when Barney tried to rehabilitate

him and Otis usually got the better of Barn. It was especially funny when Barney

tried to hypnotize him. O tis...O tis Campbell. The last episode I remember with

Otis was when he took up tile art and produced a very funny likeness of a cow.

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>C. Bogle wrote:

>I remember in one of the episodes with Flora, probably the one where the character was introduced, that at the end Goober came to Andy and complained that Flora was asking him to marry her. He wasn't quite ready for that. I think the writers likely didn't pay a whole lot of attention to the inconsistencies between episodes because they thought casual viewers wouldn't notice or if they did, it was no big deal. Now they they've been on the air all these years and there are books about the series, it's more noticeable.

 

Yeah, the writers didn't expect the episodes to be viewed on a daily basis the way they are now in syndication.

 

>I had forgotten about Emhardt being the Foster's polish man. In the bw episode Opie was hoping he would stay so Opie could have the chance to enjoy adventurous sleeping on the ironing board.

 

The Foster man was one of the two car breakdown episodes. Foster let Goober use his car phone.

 

>Wasn't Morrelli's also the location of all the troubles with Howard, Miss Fairchild, and Andy's "date" with Mrs. Sprague? I know it was often mentioned when the foursome of Andy, Helen, Barney, and Thelma Lou were thinking of eating out.

 

This is exactly what I'm talking about. It's the same location, yet sometimes it's called Morrelli's, and sometimes it's called the diner. Yet there is another location (the one in which Flora was first introduced) that is also called the diner.

 

The Morrelli's/diner hybrid location was also used when Andy, Helen, Goober, and the woman who looked like Mariette Harley but wasn't went out to dinner. I believe she was a relative, yet she was having problems with her boyfriend and there was some romantic tension between her and Andy that got Helen upset. They went to this location, and she didn't want to dance when Goober asked but then offered to teach Andy, because "teaching's different." Another inconsistency, since in this episode Andy didn't know how to dance, yet he and Barney took Helen and Thelma Lou to dances in many earlier episodes. And I don't think Andy was pretending not to know how so she would dance with him--I think the writers wrote it as him seriously not knowing how to dance, ignoring all the previous episodes in which they had gone dancing with no problems. There was a later episode with a school dance in which both Opie and Andy didn't know how to do the modern dances, but that was different because it was modern dancing. Andy had clearly demonstrated in earlier B&W episodes that he could do traditional dancing when he and Helen and Barney and Thelma Lou went out (such as the episode with Mary Grace and Gomer).

 

It was strange--Andy didn't want her to come visit, but Aunt Bee and Helen told him to be more courteous. Then they both jumped all over his case for "encouraging" this woman, yet I couldn't see where he ever did anything to lead her on. It was Helen and Aunt Bee that started the whole mess. This is why I always had problems with Helen and Aunt Bee.

 

>I'm guessing that escargot was never on the menu at Morrelli's.

 

Probably not. :-)

 

>I happened to catch an episode today on TV Land and Maude Prickett showed up as a neighbor when Opie was stuck between practicing the piano or playing football. Arnold took over until Andy came home and the jig was up. Arnold was finally good for something.

 

I saw that one too this weekend and thought of our discussion when I saw Maude Prickett playing the neighbor. I'm not sure if she was playing Mrs. Larch or not since Bee called her by her first name. I liked that the coach could play piano too, demonstrating that it was possible to pursue two interests at once. Also demonstrating that Andy was being completely unreasonable.

 

Here is another inconsistency--the next-door neighbors keep changing. Sometimes it is implied Clara lives next door, sometimes not, as in the episode in which Bee learns to drive because Andy can't drive her over to Clara's.

 

>I liked Otis too, especially during the many times when Barney tried to rehabilitate him and Otis usually got the better of Barn. It was especially funny when Barney tried to hypnotize him. O tis...O tis Campbell. The last episode I remember with Otis was when he took up tile art and produced a very funny likeness of a cow.

 

I think Warren got him on that kick. Warren was trying to rehabilitate Otis with arts and crafts. Warren wouldn't listen when they tried to tell him others like Barney and Aunt Bee had tried. Barney used to try to rehabilitate prisoners with that stuff, too. I remember the episode "Aunt Bee, the Warden" in which one of the prisoners made a passkey with the metalworking set Barney gave him. It was really funny when the first prisoner said, "I'll take the Mr. Potato set!"

 

Heck, supposedly Aunt Bee DID reform Otis in the episode "Aunt Bee the Warden" ("Bloody Mary!" "The Rock!") but apparently it didn't stick. Still, Warren had to try himself.

 

There were definitely later episodes with Otis, as there was one post-Warren in which Otis and Howard try to "rescue" Andy who is being held prisoner in a shack by two bad men.

 

I like when Barney was trying to get Otis to talk in his sleep. Otis told him to find the moonshine he had to up to Pennsylvania, over to Ohio, back through West Virginia, and back into North Carolina. The address of the still ended up being...Barney's address! A very funny scene.

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> {quote:title=voranis wrote:}{quote}

>

>

>

> supposedly Emmett and Martha had just moved to Mayberry from Mount Pilot after Floyd retired (Howard McNear having passed away right after the last episode of season 7 was filmed).

Howard McNear retired for health reasons toward the end of season 7. As that season progressed, he began to suffer a series of minor strokes (on top of the debilitating stroke he suffered in the middle of the 3rd season). He was noticably slower in the episode "Floyd's Barbershop," and in the next episode "Goober's Contest" it was apparent to everyone that he could no longer continue.

 

McNear moved to the Motion Picture Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, and died two years later in early 1969.

 

Another inconsistency, ref: Emmett & Martha's residency... at first, it was said that Emmett ran his fix-it shop in Mt. Pilot, and then moved to Mayberry. Later, it was mentioned that he ran the shop out of his home garage, and the Clarks had always lived in Mayberry. An episode of RFD had he and Martha paying off their 20-year mortgage, and Emmett retiring (shortlived).

 

 

I didn't see it mentioned earlier (I apologize if I overlooked), but Mabel Albertson was Cloris Leachman's mother-in-law. There was a period of a couple years in the early 1980s when Cloris took a sabbatical from acting to care for Mabel, who was terminally ill with Alzheimers.

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OMG! I didnt know that Mabel was Leachman's mother-in-law. So Mabel was one in real life too! LOL. I hope she was nicer than the characters she portrayed! :D

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>Shemp wrote:

>Howard McNear retired for health reasons toward the end of season 7. As that season progressed, he began to suffer a series of minor strokes (on top of the debilitating stroke he suffered in the middle of the 3rd season). He was noticably slower in the episode "Floyd's Barbershop," and in the next episode "Goober's Contest" it was apparent to everyone that he could no longer continue.

>

>McNear moved to the Motion Picture Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, and died two years later in early 1969.

 

I read somewhere that he died after the last episode of season 7 was filmed ("Goober's Contest"). I didn't know he lived two years longer. Thanks for correcting that.

 

His face was very stiff and his speech very slurred in "Goober's Contest." At one point it seemed to me that George Lindsey, as he was talking to McNear, moved to the other side of the barber chair so McNear could read the prompts more easily as they were talking. I'm not sure if that's true or not; it was just an impression. It was very noticeable that someone else was driving Floyd's car when he drove away from the filling station. This episodes is always very sad for me to watch. Floyd seems to be out of character a bit when he immediately cries, "Fraud! I charge fraud." The character was so easygoing in the early episodes, and while he could get angry sometimes, he seemed a little too easily angered against Goober in this episode. Knowing it was his last episode always made this one hard for me to watch.

 

Rob Reiner was in that episode as one of the printers (and Jack Nicholson was in two episodes, I believe--the abandoned baby episode and the episode with Aunt Bee as juror). The man who had previously run the clothing shop where Opie got his suit was now running the print shop. I believe he was called Mr. Jason in one of the episodes in which he was running the men's clothing store.

 

I read that they always did such a good job of arranging scenes that most viewers were unaware of Howard McNear's limited mobility. I have been watching for it since the show began running on TV Land. I believe the first episode in which he returned was the one in which Barney gets the anniversary watch. There was a bit of fuddled dialogue when he says something and Barney says, "What?" and it seems like something went wrong with the dialogue there, but in all the confusion of the party, it fit right in. When they were all leaving, Floyd was already out the door, and kind of shuffled along with someone's hand on his shoulder, I think.

 

In the episode "Otis Sues the County," and in "The Barbershop Quartet," we see or hear Floyd at the front door of the courthouse. The scene shifts to Barney doing something (asking Floyd if he wants coffee, and we hear Floyd off-camera saying, "No thanks. I've had my cup") or Andy doing something with the prisoner that would later end up in the quartet, and when the camera returns to Floyd, he's already seated. Interestingly, in "Otis Sues the County," Floyd writes down an appointment for Barney's haircut on a piece of paper, but in most other episodes customers just come in and wait--first come, first served.

 

>Another inconsistency, ref: Emmett & Martha's residency... at first, it was said that Emmett ran his fix-it shop in Mt. Pilot, and then moved to Mayberry. Later, it was mentioned that he ran the shop out of his home garage, and the Clarks had always lived in Mayberry. An episode of RFD had he and Martha paying off their 20-year mortgage, and Emmett retiring (shortlived).

 

I was aware of the inconsistency that they moved from Mount Pilot vs. he had run the shop from his home garage. Either way, I doubt Martha Clark was formerly Mrs. Lukens who ran the dress shop before she married Emmett. :-) I didn't know about the RFD episode; I haven't seen that show in 30 years. I would love to see it.

 

There was usually a TV Repair Shop to the left of Floyd's Barber Shop. The TV Repair Shop was between the grocery store (Foley's sometimes) and Floyd's. I always thought it interesting that they had Emmett move into Floyd's when they could have developed it as Emmett having been running that TV Repair Shop all those years. The TV Repair Shop was gone when Emmett's character was brought in. I wonder where the new barber shop was in Mayberry after Emmett took over Floyd's?

 

Also strange that Howard seemed to have been county clerk for so many years but no mention of him until a new character was needed after Warren disappeared. A sheriff would probably interact with the county clerk a lot (at least, Andy sure did after they brought in Howard as a regular). And I wonder what happened to the mayor? I didn't like Parley Baer much as Mayor Stoner; he never really seemed to fit in. Dick Francis as Mayor Pike was hilarious to me--I loved the way his opinion drifted with the wind--or more accurately, with the last proposal on the town council. I remember him saying something like, "The only plaque Otis Campbell deserves is from the Distiller's Association of America."

 

Dick Francis was in the I Love Lucy episode with Bob Hope at the ball park. It cracked me up when he said, "You forgot my relish." I always thought the man probably could have read the phone book and it would have made me laugh.

 

>I didn't see it mentioned earlier (I apologize if I overlooked), but Mabel Albertson was Cloris Leachman's mother-in-law. There was a period of a couple years in the early 1980s when Cloris took a sabbatical from acting to care for Mabel, who was terminally ill with Alzheimers.

 

I didn't know that; very interesting.

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Yes, I remember Jack Nicholson in those episodes.......They kept Floyd sitting a lot after he returned, I remember. He was a great character........

 

 

I guess no one got a haircut after he retired? Or had it cut at home? LOL.

 

Edited by: Hibi on Jul 12, 2011 4:38 PM

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> {quote:title=voranis wrote:}{quote}

> I read that they always did such a good job of arranging scenes that most viewers were unaware of Howard McNear's limited mobility. I have been watching for it since the show began running on TV Land. I believe the first episode in which he returned was the one in which Barney gets the anniversary watch. There was a bit of fuddled dialogue when he says something and Barney says, "What?" and it seems like something went wrong with the dialogue there, but in all the confusion of the party, it fit right in. When they were all leaving, Floyd was already out the door, and kind of shuffled along with someone's hand on his shoulder, I think.

 

 

The anniversary watch episode, "Barney's Physical," was from the 5th season. Howard McNear returned to the GRIFFITH SHOW during (approx.) last 1/3 of the 4th season, appearing in "Divorce Mountain Style," "The Rumor" (the only episode where he shared a scene with Jim Nabors, whose 'Gomer' character was originally introduced to fill the void created when McNear suffered his first stroke), and a couple other episodes.

 

GRIFFITH wasn't the only show to accomdate Howard. Prior to his illness, McNear made some bit appearances on GUNSMOKE as the proprietor of the general store (he costarred on the 1950s radio show as 'Doc'). When he returned to work in 1964, GUNSMOKE brought him back a few more times. He stopped doing GUNSMOKE when Don Knotts left the GRIFFITH SHOW, and the 'Howard' and 'Goober' characters were given more screen time.

 

> {quote:title=voranis wrote:

> }{quote}I wonder where the new barber shop was in Mayberry after Emmett took over Floyd's?

>

>

>

> And I wonder what happened to the mayor? I didn't like Parley Baer much as Mayor Stoner; he never really seemed to fit in. Dick Francis as Mayor Pike was hilarious to me--I loved the way his opinion drifted with the wind--or more accurately, with the last proposal on the town council."

 

 

We never see a barber in Mayberry again, until the 3rd season episode of RFD "Hair", when Emmett decides to buy a toupee. Obviously, it wasn't the same barbershop storefront; in fact, that was the year RFD moved exterior shooting from Culver City's 40 Acres backlot, to the WB backlot in Burbank. The barber? Played by none other than Allan Melvin, in his 9th visit to Mayberry.

 

The last mention of a mayor is season 6's "The Cannon." The Mayor is on vacation in Hawaii, so the town water commissioner (played by Byron Foulger) is chosen to award the Governor the key to the city at the Founder's Day Parade.

 

The Mayor character was dropped for several reasons, per writers Jack Elinson and Harvey Bullock, who each were past guests at Mayberry Days in Mt. Airy NC. One, it was decided that the character was unnecessary to create conflict for Andy; the situations created by Barney, Gomer, Floyd, etc., served that function well. And budgetary reasons... salaries of the regular cast were going up, production inflation, and Jim Nabors was elevated to recurring costar status. Only so much screen time to go around to a fairly large cast for a 1/2-hour ensemble-format sitcom.

 

By late season 8, and the introduction of Ken Berry in "Sam For Town Council," it was implied that the town had reorganized its government, and no longer had a mayor; the head of the Town Council (Sam) was the defacto mayor. The portrayal of the Council and Sam during all 3 seasons of RFD supports that presumption.

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