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Mabel Albertson

196 posts in this topic

 

 

No, it wasn't Adamo. This guy was an older, short, stocky, balding man (no it

wasn't George Costanza either). I've also seen him in other TV shows, including

Andy Griffith. Can't remember his name, just one of those TV regulars that are

always popping up. I know Frank Adamo had a lot of bit parts on Dick Van Dyke,

and he likely manned the pastry cart too. I think I also remember that promo from

way back. I haven't seen the show since it was last on all those years ago and I'm

enjoying seeing it again.

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Maybe one of the reasons I think of Beaver as being set in the suburbs are those wide streets and generous lawns of the neighborhood of the second house. They just seem so suburban, though they could be in small town too.

 

Yes, lots of neighborhoods in my hometown had wide streets and large front lawns--many much larger than the Cleavers' front lawn--and my hometown wasn't a suburb.

 

>I don't think there are too many shots looking from Andy's house up to the town, but I seem to remember that, at least in the b & w episodes, the street looked unpaved.

 

There were at least a handful of episodes in which someone is standing in the front edge of Andy's yard and you can see large buildings at the end of the street. Another curiosity is the long building with the white clapboards directly across from Andy's house. It could be a church, although it is so long it looks more like a fellowship hall. One episode in which it is shown, I think, is the one with Uncle Ollie and wife played by Maude Prickett.

 

>The episode about Howard's swinging bachelor pad was a funny one, like most of the episodes where he is featured. Dig those beads and pillows. Poor Helen thought her feet were done for the evening, and then Emmett shows up and, with the best of intentions, starts the dancing all up again.

 

Emmett actually saved the party; Helen seemed to enjoy dancing with him. And Emmett can really dance as opposed to the goofy shuffling around Howard does and the too-wild dancing of Goober. At one point the way Howard and Goober stand there snapping their fingers and swaying reminds me of "Two Wild and Crazy Guys" from Saturday Night Live. One moral of the episode is that you shouldn't assume older people can't be fun.

 

>Dick Van Dyke had a good episode last evening, "One Angry Man." Dick has to sit on a jury and is distracted by the sexy defendant, played by Sue Ann Langdon. The guy sitting next to him in the jury box is the same actor who played the pastry cart guy a few weeks ago, and the judge is an actor who also played some part in Beaver, either another judge or a school administrator. So the revolving cast of actors continues. Even though I hadn't seen Dick Van Dyke in about ten years before it started up again, I remembered this episode, it's a funny one.

 

I saw this episode on TV Land and liked it so much I watched it again on DVD. Did you notice the district attorney's name was Mason and the defense attorney's name was Berger--a tribute to Perry Mason, I believe, although the roles were reversed (Perry Mason was a defense attorney and Hamilton Burger was the D.A.).

 

Jamie Farr (Klinger from M*A*S*H ) usually plays the guy with the pastry cart, and he wasn't in the jury. Who else played the pastry cart guy?

 

In addition to Sue Ane Langdon playing the defendant, Patsy Kelly, who is well known to TCM and classic movie fans, played one of the jurors. I guess I don't have to tell anyone in these forums who she is. Ironically, she was the only one I did not recognize on sight, and did not know who she was until watching the credits on the DVD (you can't read the credits the way TV Land scrunches them up). Maybe no so ironic, since I don't know as much about classic film as I do about classic TV.

 

The actor who played the judge played Wally's principal in an episode of Leave It to Beaver.

 

The balding man juror who was a cab driver was played by Herbie Faye. He played the prisoner that Opie tape records in the episode of The Andy Griffith Show titled "The Tape Recorder." He was also in the episodes "Aunt Bee Takes a Job" and "Banjo-Playing Deputy" with Jerry Van Dyke. Perhaps another in-house player in the Danny Thomas/Sheldon Leonard production world.

 

Another juror was played by Herb Vigran, a well-known character actor. Like Frank Adamo, TV Land did promos for Herb Vigran, Jane Dulo, and several other well-known character actors. Herb Vigran played the ringleader in The Andy Griffith Show episode "The Bookie Barber." He was the guy at the studio gates in "Taylors in Hollywood." He played a lot of judges, bartenders, and police officers over the years. He played the recurring role of Judge Brooker on Gunsmoke. One of my favorite of his roles was as the washing machine repairman in the I Love Lucy episode "Never Do Business with Friends." When they are all laughing at the end when the washing machine has been pushed over the balcony and destroyed, he looks at them and says something like, "Are you people crazy?" and runs away.

 

Dabbs Greer, who played defense lawyer Berger, played Mr. Jonas the storekeeper on Gunsmoke. He was the first man Clark Kent saved on The Adventures of Superman. He had several roles on The Andy Griffith Show, including the clerk who sold Andy the preserve jars in "The Bed Jacket" and one of Barney's real estate customers in "Barney Fife, Realtor." But I remember him best for all the ministers he has played: the chaplain who performs Rob and Laura's wedding ceremony in a flashback episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show, the minister who performs Mike and Carol's wedding ceremony on the pilot of The Brady Bunch, Reverend Alden on Little House on the Prairie, and the Protestant minister on Picket Fences.

 

Other than Patsy Kelly, the other credit I didn't know until I saw the closing credits was director John Rich. I have found over the years that my favorite episodes of many TV shows were directed by him. He directed what I consider to be the best seasons of All in the Family, seasons 1-3, before Mike and Gloria moved out to the Jefferons' old house. The show seemed to have a harder edge in the early seasons which I liked. I saw him in an interview on TV Land--perhaps it was TV Land Moguls or TV Land's Top Ten, in which he said he thought writing the storyline in which Mike & Gloria had a baby was a mistake for the show. I definitely thought the show was not as funny as it became softer after the baby was born. So I find myself in agreement with Mr. Rich's instincts about TV and I have also found I tend to like episodes he directed. Of course this episode of The Dick Van Dyke show was written by Carl Reiner so that helps a lot, but there are lots of funny things like the way Rob falls out of the jury box that I expect John Rich had a hand in.

 

Although I am not a big fan of The Brady Bunch, I like some episodes from the first season before it became too campy. I was not too surprised when I started noticing "Directed by John Rich" on the episodes I found the most touching or heartwarming.

 

I just watched an episode of the old B&W half-hour Gunsmoke (titled Marshal Dillon for syndication) on MeTV the other day titled "How to Kill a Woman" in which Matt has a showdown with a gunslinger played by Pernell Roberts (who would play a gunslinger in a later color episode as well) at a way station. As the episode ended, I thought, "This was a nice, lean episode," and then suddenly the magical words "Directed by John Rich" appeared. Of course, the episode was written by Sam Peckinpah and his stories always seem to be hard-edged and lean, but I am still surprised how often I find John Rich's name as director on TV show episodes I find to be exceptional.

 

I believe Frank Adamo was one of the jurors in the back left corner of the jury of the "One Angry Man" episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show. I think I recognized him although he had no speaking role in the episode and thus was not listed in the closing credits (on the DVD). Of course you can't see the closing credits on TV Land very well.

 

Even MeTV doesn't always do a perfect job--they do cut scenes for commercials, and in our area the musical interlude on the color episodes of Gunsmoke between the end of the episode and the closing credits--where the gun is shown hanging in the holster on the wall--is often cut. This is bad because that's where the writer and director credits are shown. Seems like there ought to be Guild rules preventing networks from cutting these credits. I don't know if it's just our MeTV station showing more commercials and PSAs, or if the musical interlude is being cut on all MeTV stations.

 

I sure wish we had the equivalent of TCM for classic TV--a channel that shows classic TV 24/7, with no scenes cut for commercials, and full-screen closing credits. I wouldn't mind if they showed commercials, as long as they didn't cut any scenes out of the episodes. I would also like them to use a ratings card like TCM and Encore Westerns, rather than superimposing the ratings bug over the beginning of the episode.

 

Bad news, C.Bogle...starting today, TV Land is moving The Dick Van Dyke Show back to something like 5-6 p.m. The King of Queens starts tonight at 11 p.m., so the two-hour block of Everybody Loves Raymond moves back to 9-11 p.m., Married with Children moves back to 7-9 p.m., and M*A*S*H is at 6-7 p.m. I don't like Married with Children as, unlike All in the Family in which the characters argue because they have legitimate disagreements with each other, on Married it seems they are just mean to each other for no reason at all. Schedules seem to change on a weekly basis on TV Land and Nick at Nite these days.

 

If these networks want a following, they need to give viewers time to get used to the schedule rather than yanking everything around after one week if the ratings don't do well. Although I realize in this case the change is not being made due to ratings but due to the planned addition of The King of Queens. But Nick at Nite has been shuffling their schedule around for weeks now and there haven't been any new additions since Friends.

 

Robbie

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I couldn't recall the name of the actor that sat next to Rob in the

jury box, but I did recognize the face. He did appear in a number of

Griffith episodes, usually playing a questionable character, especially,

as you mention, the robber who was taped by Opie and Arnold. His

voice is quite distinctive too. He appeared as the pastry cart man in

one of the earlier episodes that just ran a week or so ago. If they

hadn't beeen so close together, I probably wouldn't have remembered

him. I didn't notice too many of the other jurors. Maybe, like Dick, I

was mainly focused on Sue Ann Langdon. Lots of good physical comedy

too with Rob falling out of the jury box.

 

Yes, Paul Hartman could really dance, but I still think Helen was

relieved when it was over. However good her partner, her feet must

really have been hurting. Yep, Howard and Goober were two mild and

crazy guys. Some swinging party.

 

 

 

All in the Family was funnier when all four characters had to coexist in

the same house and had to run up against one another all the time, es-

pecially Archie and Mike. Maybe the producers thought that would wear

thin after a while and wanted to open up the show a bit, but that's just

a guess.

 

 

Yep, TVL changed things again. What has it been, two or three weeks

since Dick has been on from 7 to 7:30? I was just getting used to watching

it at 7:30 every weekday night. It's nice to see it that way instead of in

big blocks all the time. Guess I won't have much of a choice now. The

King of Queens seems to be on a lot of stations lately. I always like that

show, thought I've seen most of the episodes more than once. Jerry Stiller

was a big help.

 

 

I remember about a year ago I got the Encore Western channel free for some

period of time, some DirecTV promo or something. I saw some of the half hour

Gunsmoke shows and many were quite good.

 

 

 

 

 

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>I couldn't recall the name of the actor that sat next to Rob in the jury box, but I did recognize the face. He did appear in a number of Griffith episodes, usually playing a questionable character, especially, as you mention, the robber who was taped by Opie and Arnold. His voice is quite distinctive too. He appeared as the pastry cart man in one of the earlier episodes that just ran a week or so ago. If they hadn't beeen so close together, I probably wouldn't have remembered him. I didn't notice too many of the other jurors. Maybe, like Dick, I was mainly focused on Sue Ann Langdon. Lots of good physical comedy too with Rob falling out of the jury box.

 

I didn't know the name of the actor, either. I had to look it up. But I did recognize him from The Andy Griffith Show episodes I mentioned. As I said, I didn't recognize Patsy Kelly at all until I saw the end credits rolled. She must have been the rather large woman sitting behind Rob in the jury box. Herb Vigran and Dabbs Greer I knew on sight, and knew their names.

 

>Yes, Paul Hartman could really dance, but I still think Helen was relieved when it was over. However good her partner, her feet must really have been hurting. Yep, Howard and Goober were two mild and crazy guys. Some swinging party.

 

Helen seemed to perk up when she started dancing with Emmett. She had looked tired and annoyed when dancing with Howard and Goober, but she cheered right up when dancing with Emmett. So I think Emmett turned the party around. Hey, I notice when Helen looks happy because it doesn't happen that often. :-)

 

>All in the Family was funnier when all four characters had to coexist in the same house and had to run up against one another all the time, es-pecially Archie and Mike. Maybe the producers thought that would wear thin after a while and wanted to open up the show a bit, but that's just a guess.

 

Yeah, I think it was funnier then too. Apparently so did John Rich. The show had a different tone after they moved out. I don't think it's just coincidence that they moved out right at the same time John Rich stopped directing.

 

>Yep, TVL changed things again. What has it been, two or three weeks since Dick has been on from 7 to 7:30? I was just getting used to watching it at 7:30 every weekday night. It's nice to see it that way instead of in big blocks all the time. Guess I won't have much of a choice now. The King of Queens seems to be on a lot of stations lately. I always like that show, thought I've seen most of the episodes more than once. Jerry Stiller was a big help.

 

I agree, without Stiller they wouldn't have had much of a show.

 

That's TV Land (and Nick at Nite) for you--just when you settle in to their schedule, they change it. :-(

 

>I remember about a year ago I got the Encore Western channel free for some period of time, some DirecTV promo or something. I saw some of the half hour Gunsmoke shows and many were quite good.

 

I've had Encore Westerns for ten years and I've never known them to run the half-hour B&W episodes. They've always run the hour-long B&W episodes. (Whereas TV Land ran the hour-long color episodes.) But maybe I missed a special promo event or something. I like many of the color episodes because that's what I grew up watching in syndication. For some reason, none of the B&W episodes got much syndication time when I was growing up--maybe they figured since they had 9 years of color episodes to show, why show the B&W ones? But all of the B&W episodes, and especially the half-hour ones, have tighter story lines. The later color episodes of Gunsmoke had some terribly "soft" stories. Some didn't even feature the main characters--there were several with Harry Morgan trying to get wives for his sons that looked like a Seven Brides for Seven Brothers rip-off. I got the impression that some of the episodes without the regular cast were attempts to spin off new series. I usually skip these episodes.

 

Robbie

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Thank goodness there weren't any other women present at

Howard's "swinging party." Helen would likely have had one of

her jealousy fits and tore those over sized cushions into little pieces.

I remember someone, I think it was Andy, mentioning that they

had to go because they had to get up early for church and then

Howard saying that tomorrow was a Saturday. That's desperation.

 

 

 

I went back and checked out Gunsmoke and I did see some of the hour

episodes, not half hour. Burt Reynolds was in quite a few and he didn't

come in until after they went to the hour long format. Ken Curtis was

also in a few before he became the deputy and he was sort of an

ornery roughneck but with a good heart, somewhat tougher than after

he became the deputy. I guess they were so good they felt like they

were only half an hour. Besides those, I haven't seen Gunsmoke in years,

mostly because of bad scheduling and also I just haven't had the time.

 

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=C.Bogle wrote:

> }{quote}Yes, Paul Hartman could really dance...

>

Paul Hartman and his wife Grace had a dance/comedy act, were headliners in 1920s vaudeville, and on Broadway in the '30s and '40s. They each won the 1948 Tony for Best Performer in a Musical-Comedy. You can catch them in the Frank Sinatra musical HIGHER AND HIGHER (1943), which turns up on TCM once or twice a year; it's on WHV DVD too.

 

There was an episode of MAYBERRY RFD, where Paul and fellow hoofer Ken Berry did a number together.

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Thank goodness there weren't any other women present at Howard's "swinging party." Helen would likely have had one of her jealousy fits and tore those over sized cushions into little pieces. I remember someone, I think it was Andy, mentioning that they had to go because they had to get up early for church and then Howard saying that tomorrow was a Saturday. That's desperation.

 

I think the way it went was, Andy said they had to go because Helen had to get up early for school the next day. Howard mentioned that the next day was Sunday, and Andy quickly adjusted by saying, "Sunday School."

 

>I went back and checked out Gunsmoke and I did see some of the hour episodes, not half hour. Burt Reynolds was in quite a few and he didn't come in until after they went to the hour long format. Ken Curtis was also in a few before he became the deputy and he was sort of an ornery roughneck but with a good heart, somewhat tougher than after he became the deputy. I guess they were so good they felt like they were only half an hour. Besides those, I haven't seen Gunsmoke in years, mostly because of bad scheduling and also I just haven't had the time.

 

Yeah, Burt Reynolds played Quint Asper, the blacksmith. Festus often addressed him as "Comanche." Ken Curtis appeared in several early half-hour B&W episodes as other characters. He also appeared in an hour-long episode titled "Lover Boy" as a different character, less hillbilly than Festus was. There was some overlap between Festus and Chester, with Festus appearing in a few episodes with Chester before Dennis Weaver left. Did you know Ken Curtis, who played Festus, was a singer with The Sons of the Pioneers and also with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra during the transition between Frank Sinatra and Dick Haymes? He could sing a lot better in real life than the character of Festus probably could.

 

Rose Marie appeared in a promo today on MeTV for The Dick Van Dyke Show. I don't know exactly when the promo was made--many of them were made years ago when MeTV was still local to the Chicago area. But I checked and apparently Rose Marie is still alive. I had no idea she was still alive.

 

>Shemp wrote:

>>C.Bogle wrote:

>>Yes, Paul Hartman could really dance...

>Paul Hartman and his wife Grace had a dance/comedy act, were headliners in 1920s vaudeville, and on Broadway in the '30s and '40s. They each won the 1948 Tony for Best Performer in a Musical-Comedy. You can catch them in the Frank Sinatra musical HIGHER AND HIGHER (1943), which turns up on TCM once or twice a year; it's on WHV DVD too.

>

>There was an episode of MAYBERRY RFD, where Paul and fellow hoofer Ken Berry did a number together.

 

I was aware of Paul Hartman's dancing career which is why I even bothered to mention Emmett's dancing saving the party--I thought it was such a nice touch to capitalize on Hartman's experience. I also knew about his appearance in Higher and Higher. I think I posted something once before about "Emmett" appearing in Higher and Higher during one of its semi-annual airings on TCM. However, I didn't know about his dance number on Mayberry R.F.D (can't get it on any channel and it's not on DVD yet), so that's pretty cool to learn! I hope I get a chance to see it sometime! I wish they would release Mayberry R.F.D. on DVD. Since I like the later seasons of TAGS more now than I did as a child, I think I would really enjoy seeing RFD again now. I haven't seen it since I was a child.

 

Robbie

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I knew Paul Hartman had a background as a dancer, but I didn't know too

many of the details. He was much smoother as a dancer than as a fix-it

man.

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Perhaps that's the way it went, I'm just going by my somewhat faulty

memory. The bottom line was they wanted to get the heck out of there.

If it wasn't for the plot requirement of having just one woman at the party,

it would have made perfect sense for Howard to invite Miss Fairchild and

Flora, but TV shows rarely work that way. At least this was one Sprague

social disaster that couldn't be blamed on Mrs. Sprague.

 

Yes, Dennis Weaver was also in some of the episodes I saw (one of the

actors that Goober did), along with Burt Reynolds and Ken Curtis. I remember

hearing that Ken Curtis sang with the Sons of the Pioneers, but I didn't

know he was a big band singer. Quite a change in tone from Festus.

 

 

I haven't seen Mayberry R.F.D. since it was first on or maybe if it was in early

syndication. That's why I hardly remember any of the episodes, unlike Andy,

which has been on for such a long time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It appears TV Land has brought back Leave It to Beaver and The Andy Griffith Show, although at times when many folks may not be able to watch, since it's during the weekday mornings. I just found out about the new lineup today, but apparently it started at the beginning of last week (Nov. 7):

 

8 a.m. Leave It to Beaver

8:35 a.m. Leave It to Beaver

9:10 a.m. The Dick Van Dyke Show

9:44 a.m. The Dick Van Dyke Show

10:18 a.m. Bewitched

10:52 a.m. The Andy Griffith Show

11:26 a.m. The Andy Griffith Show

12:00 p.m. Good Times

12:30 p.m. The Jeffersons

1 p.m. Sanford and Son

 

It's probably the most classic TV lineup they've had in a long time. I wonder if they're feeling the pinch from Antenna TV (where I can watch Beaver and Good Times ) and MeTV (where I can watch Dick Van Dyke). At least on Antenna TV and MeTV I can watch these shows in the evening. Now, if one of them would just add Andy!

 

I haven't seen Beaver or Andy on TV Land on the weekends in a while; too many Hot in Cleveland marathons and such. I notice no matter how many special marathons they have on the weekends, they never seem to preempt Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, which is a show I'm not really interested in because it's not scripted drama. I'm sure they do good work, but I'm just not interested in reality TV. Ironically, the one show on their network I have no interest in is the one they never seem to preempt, as if it were graven in a stone contract or something.

 

The multiple non-consecutive airings of Dick Van Dyke on TV Land didn't last long. TV Land should market themselves with: "Here at TV Land out pledge to our viewers is that schedules will change on a daily basis so you're guaranteed to never know what's on!"

 

Robbie

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Whereas it used to be check your local listings, with TV Land it should

be check listings daily, or hourly. The early morning and afternoon

schedule doesn't help me, because I'm not home, and if I recorded them,

I'd just have a always bigger stack of unwatched shows. Kind of the

way it is with TCM. What's weird is they use the thirty-five minute time

slot and then go back to the thirty minute one with no apparent rhyme or

reason, just like everything else about the channel.

 

TVL is kind of a teaser channel. They made a big deal about the Dick Van

Dyke Anniversary, had a marathon, then put it on at 7 to 8 pm. That lasted

about what, maybe a month. Then it's a one way ticket to the early morning

hours.

 

There is some good news about TVL. While I was checking their schedule, I

noticed they have a few episodes of each show available for viewing. They

are available for a limited amount of time, and then I suppose they make new

episodes available. I just started watching last night. Saw the Dinner At Eight

episode of Andy, where he has a chance to be alone for a weekend and before

he can settle in Goober's there with a suitcase to spend the weekend with Andy.

Then Andy has to eat three spaghetti dinners, one of which is prepared by Mrs.

Sprague. They even show the closing credits full screen, unlike when they air on

TV. Maybe this is a solution to the TV Land problem. :)

 

 

 

 

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Whereas it used to be check your local listings, with TV Land it should be check listings daily, or hourly. The early morning and afternoon schedule doesn't help me, because I'm not home, and if I recorded them, I'd just have a always bigger stack of unwatched shows. Kind of the way it is with TCM. What's weird is they use the thirty-five minute time slot and then go back to the thirty minute one with no apparent rhyme or reason, just like everything else about the channel.

 

Yeah, I said I thought the time slot would be bad for a lot of people. And the 35-minute scheduling is weird all right. Making their schedule even harder to watch. Most of these shows I have on DVD, but I prefer watching them live. But the time is bad. Like you, I don't want to record them again because I already have too much recorded stuff I haven't been able to watch. It sounds like we both prefer to watch the shows live when we can. We are a dying breed because with the advent of DVRs a lot of people don't care to watch TV live anymore.

 

>TVL is kind of a teaser channel. They made a big deal about the Dick Van Dyke Anniversary, had a marathon, then put it on at 7 to 8 pm. That lasted about what, maybe a month. Then it's a one way ticket to the early morning hours.

 

I've been thinking of it as a teaser channel too. Maybe they just air the shows briefly to get people to buy the DVDs? Many of the shows are distributed by Paramount on DVD and I believe Paramount and TV Land are all part of the Viacom family.

 

>There is some good news about TVL. While I was checking their schedule, I noticed they have a few episodes of each show available for viewing. They are available for a limited amount of time, and then I suppose they make new episodes available. I just started watching last night. Saw the Dinner At Eight episode of Andy, where he has a chance to be alone for a weekend and before he can settle in Goober's there with a suitcase to spend the weekend with Andy. Then Andy has to eat three spaghetti dinners, one of which is prepared by Mrs. Sprague. They even show the closing credits full screen, unlike when they air on TV. Maybe this is a solution to the TV Land problem.

 

Online viewing will be the solution for a lot of TV if everyone can get enough bandwidth and processing power. As lzcutter has noted in her experiences, most of the shows I've tried watching start sputtering and freezing up about 20 minutes in. I tried watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show on one site (hulu?) and I got the same problems lzcutter has mentioned. Also I don't want to watch TV right now on my computer, but eventually I can fix that with an Ethernet cable from my office to my family room where the TV is. Also I hear a dedicated device for Internet viewing connected to the TV may be less likely to freeze up because unlike a computer it doesn't have a lot of other software or processes in the background competing for memory.

 

I have Primetime on Demand with my cable company and I notice when I watch The Big Bang Theory using that, I get to see the full closing credits and hear the closing theme music, which I never hear when it airs on CBS. On demand viewing definitely has some benefits! I also see the full closing credits and hear the closing music on syndicated episodes of the show airing on our CW affiliate, which was never the case when the episodes aired originally on CBS.

 

The "Dinner at Eight" episode has always seemed strange to me. All Andy had to say to get out of it was that Goober made a mistake and because of that, he had already eaten. Instead he puts up with Helen getting angry and all of that. And when he says he's not hungry any more, Opie reminds him of what he had told him about the starving kids in other countries, forcing Andy to eat more. Andy should have told Opie to go to hell. :-)

 

I did like that they show Opie being in the "real" Boy Scouts (his uniform was exactly like the one I wore in the summer when I was in Scouts) instead of having to make up substitutes for Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts (just saw The Brady Bunch episode with the "Frontier Scouts" and the "Sunflower Girls") as they have had to do with most shows since the late sixties.

 

Everyone having the same "secret" ingredient of oregano is a nice touch in the "Dinner at Eight" episode...

 

Robbie

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Well, what do you know, Helen is angry at Andy and this time it

has nothing to do with her jealousy problem. Will wonders never

cease. I also always wondered why Andy didn't just explain the

situation to Helen and politely excuse himself from eating his third

spaghetti dinner. But this is sitcom land. I don't know much about

cooking, but even I wasn't too surprised that oregano would be

an ingredient in spaghetti sauce. Opie got a chance to get

back at Andy for making a big deal about finishing his breakfast,

so he took his shot. Can't blame the kid too much. Maybe it's just

my personal taste, but they seemed to be pretty skimpy with the

sauce and the cheese. I love spaghetti just like Opie, but I like

lots of sauce and cheese on it too. I got a kick out of the kitchen

scene with Mrs. Sprague and Howard just before Andy showed up.

You're just like your father Howard, you never rinse the back of the

plates. She was pretty polite in the episode, compared to others.

I'll never forget her dig at Andy in The County Clerk episode: Howard's

job is different from yours, Andrew. He has to use his mind. Now that's a

classic.

 

 

 

I was in the Cub and Boy Scouts for a couple of years. I don't think

we got to use our axes that freely. It sure looks like what I remember

as the uniform, and Op's in troop 44. When I got older, I didn't want

to go on weekend camping trips because my friends and I would miss

the Saturday night monster movie.

 

 

 

So far the TVL net episodes have gone smoothly. I watched one of the

Dick Van Dyke episodes that I hadn't seen, the one where Rob discovers

that Laura has her own bank account. They now have the Andy episode

up where Barney has come back for the reunion and then meets Warren,

who idolizes him and then later isn't sure Barney is equal to his reputation.

Of course everything works out in the end. They must be running the same

length ones they do on TVL, because they're only 20 or 21 or 22 minutes long.

I don't think they had ten minutes worth of commercials back in the 1960s.

But it's better than nothing at all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Well, what do you know, Helen is angry at Andy and this time it has nothing to do with her jealousy problem. Will wonders never cease.

 

I know the first example I cited of Helen being "difficult" wasn't over jealousy at all--it was because Andy initially refused to play matchmaker between Howard and the new county nurse.

 

It looks like Helen gets angry over lots of things. That just makes my case even better that she's a difficult person.

 

>I also always wondered why Andy didn't just explain the situation to Helen and politely excuse himself from eating his third spaghetti dinner. But this is sitcom land.

 

This plot hole was much larger than holes in other episodes. So I don't just chalk it up to "it's TV," but wonder why the writers were being lazy.

 

>I don't know much about cooking, but even I wasn't too surprised that oregano would be an ingredient in spaghetti sauce.

 

Me too.

 

>Opie got a chance to get back at Andy for making a big deal about finishing his breakfast, so he took his shot. Can't blame the kid too much.

 

I acknowledged Opie was trying to get even when I said "Opie reminds him of what he had told him about the starving kids in other countries," and since I still said Andy should've told him to go to hell, obviously I do not agree that Opie getting revenge makes him blameless. He's the kid and he shouldn't be talking back, especially when they are guests in someone else's house. It's one thing when it's in their own home, and another thing when they're at someone else's house. Besides--he's the child, and Andy's the parent. Too many kids try to skip meals and end up paying for it later--especially during the day at school. And kids need more food than adults do because of their metabolisms. Often a child is not mature enough to decide when they can skip a meal, while an adult is. I still think it would've been funny if Andy had told him to go to hell. Opie has a big mouth in a lot of episodes and I think it would've been funny if someone had told him to shut the hell up every once in a while. When I was a kid, we would've gotten a good smack for talking back the way big-mouth Dopie Opie does.

 

>Maybe it's just my personal taste, but they seemed to be pretty skimpy with the sauce and the cheese. I love spaghetti just like Opie, but I like lots of sauce and cheese on it too.

 

They didn't bother with the sauce and cheese details because it's just sitcom land. :-)

 

>I got a kick out of the kitchen scene with Mrs. Sprague and Howard just before Andy showed up. You're just like your father Howard, you never rinse the back of the plates. She was pretty polite in the episode, compared to others. I'll never forget her dig at Andy in The County Clerk episode: Howard's job is different from yours, Andrew. He has to use his mind. Now that's a classic.

 

I thought it was nice that Mrs. Sprague was featured in the episode, too.

 

>I was in the Cub and Boy Scouts for a couple of years. I don't think we got to use our axes that freely. It sure looks like what I remember as the uniform, and Op's in troop 44. When I got older, I didn't want to go on weekend camping trips because my friends and I would miss the Saturday night monster movie.

 

I was surprised that Opie got was asked to bring an axe, and that he kept one stashed around the house. When I was in Scouts the adults had charge of the axes--they didn't ask the kids to bring them. But hey, it's just sitcom-land.

 

>So far the TVL net episodes have gone smoothly. I watched one of the Dick Van Dyke episodes that I hadn't seen, the one where Rob discovers that Laura has her own bank account. They now have the Andy episode up where Barney has come back for the reunion and then meets Warren, who idolizes him and then later isn't sure Barney is equal to his reputation. Of course everything works out in the end. They must be running the same length ones they do on TVL, because they're only 20 or 21 or 22 minutes long. I don't think they had ten minutes worth of commercials back in the 1960s. But it's better than nothing at all.

 

TV Land has had episodes online for 3 or 4 years now, but I never have bothered because I don't like watching them on the computer.

 

I saw the Leave It to Beaver episode tonight on Antenna TV that had the judge from the episode of The Dick Van Dyke show in which Rob is on the jury. The actor's name was Howard Wendell and he played Wally's principal in the episode "Wally's Haircomb."

 

It appears TV Land is going to run some Andy episodes during their "Over Stuffed Thanksgiving Weekend" marathon. I saw a clip from one in which Peggy does the cooking for them. I hope they show that one.

 

Robbie

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I caught two episodes of Andy today on TV Land. One thing I noticed is that they are cutting a LOT of the tags now in the episodes.

 

In "The Pickle Story," there is a tag at the end in which Andy and Barney discover Bee is now making marmalade. This was cut. The episode ended with the end of the pickle contest at the fair.

 

In "Mr. McBeevee," there is a tag in which Andy goes back to the office and tells Barney he met Mr. McBeevee, and Barney thinks Andy is going mental until Mr. McBeevee phones the office. This was cut. The episode ended with Andy meeting Mr. McBeevee in the woods.

 

In "Andy and Opie, Housekeepers," which I saw a few months ago on TV Land, Andy & Opie clean up the house before Bee's return, then dirty it up again because they want Bee to feel needed. As they are leaving to pick up Bee, Bertha (later, Clara) Edwards (later, Johnson, then, later, back to Edwards again) arrives and cleans up the house again while they are gone. When they all get back to the house, Andy and Opie are surprised to see the house clean and have to quickly dirty up the bedroom and kitchen again to make Bee feel needed. There is a tag in which Bertha stops by and asks Bee how she found the house. Bee, not knowing Bertha had cleaned it up, called it a pigsty. Bertha, not knowing Andy & Opie dirtied it up again, says, "Well!" in an outraged tone of voice. This tag was cut when last I saw the episode on TV Land.

 

The thing is, I have seen all three of these tags within the past year or two on TV Land (else I could not remember them since my memory would have faded if it had been much longer ago), but now they are cut. Looks like TV Land is making yet ANOTHER round of cuts in the Andy episodes to make room for more commercials. This is too bad as I find some of these tags very funny. It seems the time used for commercials is now not much less than the time used to actually air the episode on TV Land. This is a sad state of affairs for classic TV programming on TV Land. :-(

 

Robbie

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>C.Bogle wrote:

>Kids have such a weak hand that it's fun to see them win one every once in a while. The writers were also, in a relatively gentle way, pointing out the occasional hypocrisy of adults. Similar to that episode where Opie wants to sell one of his friends something, maybe a bike, and Andy starts to point out all the flaws, then later, when prospective buyers are looking at the Taylor house, Opie starts to mention all the flaws with it.

 

With Opie it's the opposite. He runs his big yap so much, it would be fun if someone would tell him to shut the hell up every now and again. The house buying episode is another one I was already thinking of in which I wish someone would tell him to shut up, despite the fact that Andy is being hypocritical. And another one is the auto show in Raleigh when at the restaurant Opie spills the beans to Goober's friend about Goober having the just the one filling station. It's not Opie's place to be in Goober's business, regardless of whether Goober is doing something dishonest or not. Opie's always running off at the mouth, I think it would be fun to see someone tell him to shut up for a change.

 

Opie rarely has a weak hand in this show. He is more often shown being a big mouth than he is having a weak hand; thus it would be more fun for someone to tell him to shut up. In fact, that is precisely why I mentioned it would be fun to see someone tell him to shut up every once in while in the first place, because he almost always gets the upper hand in every episode. Opie Taylor: perpetual big mouth. Helen Crump: perpetual grump.

 

>The episode where Wally got that crazy hairdo is funny. Wasn't it called a jelly roll? It certainly had a thick layer of greasy kid's stuff. And every time they showed Wally with it, that jazzy music would play. A little like the one where he bought that loud suit that sent Ward and June up the wall.

 

The jazzy music also played when Beaver starting sporting the same 'do near the end of the episode, before June puts her foot down. The episode "Wally's New Suit" is one of the ones that I was thinking of when I originally said Mayfield could not be a very big city, since in that episode they showed how close downtown is to the Cleavers' home, because Wally and Beaver walk down to the department store and back by themselves.

 

>I caught a Bonanza a few weeks ago that had two Andy guest stars in it. Old hand Will Wright, who died in the first few minutes and Nina Shipman who played Miss Fairchild. If they hadn't shown her picture at the beginning of the show as a guest star, I don't know if I would have recognized her. She played a very different character and had a very different look from the county nurse.

 

I've seen Will Wright in several episodes of Bonanza.

 

>I turned on the tube around 2 o'clock or so and thought they would be showing the Thanksgiving episodes from different shows. Instead they ran an Andy mini-marathon. I don't remember seeing the episode where pretty Peggy came in to help Andy and Opie. Wasn't it Floyd who warned Andy that Peggy was looking for a wedding band? Probably the last person you want to get advice from about affairs of the heart.

 

The Andy mini-marathon is the one I mentioned in the other post in which I said they dropped the tags from quite a few episodes. The Peggy episode aired earlier in the day. I'm glad I have them on DVD so I can see them complete when I want to, although I hate dragging out DVDs.

 

Why couldn't Floyd give advice about affairs of the heart? He was originally married on the show, with a wife and a child. Also, barbers are often great observers of human nature.

 

>They've shown the Thanksgiving episodes of Raymond so often during the last few days, I've almost got them memorized. Enough already.

 

I've practically got them memorized, too! Especially the one with the dead bird, the one with Warren's new girlfriend (who looks a lot like the aged Elinor Donahue), the one with the tofu turkey (yuck), and the one with Debra and Amy cooking with Marie. They've been showing these same episodes every day on both TV Land and TBS. It looks like they've moved right on to Christmas episodes of Raymond and King of Queens tonight.

 

But today they had a Good Times marathon this morning. The "Over Stuffed Thanksgiving Weekend" they promised sure is turning out to be strange.

 

Robbie

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I've always thought Opie was a pretty good kid. Yes, he did some of

the usual stupid things that all kids do, but overall he was okay. I

think part of his talking was to score some comedy points and move

things along. I'm sure he didn't mean to hurt Goober in the eyes of

his rival, it was just a kid moving the comedy along. Free air, it gets

'em every time. This is the episode where I noticed a Coors' truck in

the background. I think that at the time it was still a regional beer, so I

doubt it would have shown up in Raleigh, but in Cali probably. I always

get a kick out of Andy's go to line when, for whatever reason, he doesn't

want Opie around--Haven't you got some homework to do?

 

 

I had forgotten that in the early days Floyd was married with a child.

I don't think we ever saw his wife, but he did bring his son to the

"auditions" for the talent scout who turned out to be a shoe salesman.

I always thought he was on the eccentric side and probably wasn't

somebody you especially want real world advice from. Maybe it was

too many years of inhaling bay rum.

 

 

I guess the writers forgot that Floyd was married and had children too.

There's the lonely hearts episode where he pretends to be a well off

guy when his female corespondent arrives and Andy has to play his son

and Aunt Bee the maid, and there's no mention of his being married or

widowed. I have no problem with it, it's your usual sitcom "amnesia."

 

 

I like the Thanksgiving episode where Warren brings a woman his own age

instead of the young hot chick that everyone is expecting. Also the line

about how Emma is good for three hours when she takes her nap.

 

 

 

 

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Yeah, well say what ya want about Opie rainin' on Goober's parade here, voranis, but at least Opie never broke Goober's heart by tellin' him his Cary Grant impression was the worst ever!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blQrIySidO

 

;)

 

(...I've always loved the part where Goober says, "I'll do it!") :^0

 

 

 

 

 

 

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C. Bogle--

 

Sorry I don't get onto the boards much anymore--my health problems don't leave me much time to. But I wanted to let you know if you didn't know already, that TV Land has brought Andy back in the evenings--at least this week--running from about 4 to 9 p.m. Looks like it's replacing the M*A*S*H block --at least, temporarily. The way things are with TV Land I don't know how long this will last.

 

Unfortunately, TV Land doesn't air the color episodes much anymore, although they did air some when they were airing Andy in the weekday mornings from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in July. They seemed to air the episodes in theme blocks--one morning was all Aunt Bee episodes, one morning was all Floyd episodes, one morning was all Goober in love episodes. They aired the color episode with the waitress at the diner as part of the "Goober in love" theme, and they aired the color episode in which Andy has to eat three spaghetti dinners in "Dinner at Eight" as part of what appeared to be a "meal" themed block.

 

I remember you said your local station never showed the color episodes. I don't know why TV Land seems to be going that route as well. Fortunately we have two local stations in my area that air Andy and both stations usually show one B&W and one color episode each weekend.

 

Take care,

 

Robbie

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Hi voranis. I am sailing under a new flag (name that is) now. I haven't

seen you here in a while and I remember you have health problems,

so I figured that was the reason. I did notice that M*A*S*H was

suddenly in the 8 to 9 time slot and then all of a sudden it was replaced

by Andy a week or two ago. TVLand is always moving shows around

without warning. As you say, Andy may not be on long, so I'm watching

it while I have the chance. I used to watch Bonanza from 3 to 4 in the

afternoon, then it would switch to 2:30 to 3:30 for a week or two and

then back to 3 to 4, so who knows?

 

The local station is still showing Andy on Saturday and still only the

b & w episodes. I think the last b & w episode is the one with Jerry

Van Dyke as the klutzy sultan's helper, and then they go back to

the first one. I always got a kick out of the one where Andy has

to eat three spaghetti suppers in a row. I love spaghetti, but I don't

think I could take three in a row, even with that secret sauce ingredient,

oregano.

 

You take care too.

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