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scottmadson

Midnight in Paris

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The new film Midnight in Paris explores the Golden age of mostly Americans in Paris. The film ties into TCM and classic films in many ways. Anyone seen it?

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I saw it, just a few days ago. I really enjoyed it. Love the way Woody Allen uses magic -theres' no other word for it - sometimes in his films.

I thought Adrien Brody as surrealist film director Luis Bunuel was truly funny.

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I saw it too and liked it. I came into it know barely anything about it which was kind of neat. I thought Adrian Brody was supposed to be Salvatore Dali.

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That's Salvador Dali. Now you folks have me interested. I'm a big fan of both Dali and Bunuel. They did make one film together - *An Andalusian Dog*, probably the best-known surrealist film there is.

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Bunuel and Dali also collaborated on *L'AGE D'OR.*

 

As for *MIDNIGHT IN PARIS,* I saw it on opening weekend and loved it. It seemed a little pleased with its own pedaniticism at first, but its charm and romanticism eventually won me over. I think it will be nominated for a bunch of Oscars when the time comes.

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Thanks. I knew Bunuel made *L'Age D'or*, but couldn't recall if Dali was involved. I think I've only seen it twice. For years, it was impossible to find, being banned in so many places.

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scpcc1, you're right. My "bad". Adrian Brody was indeed supposed to be Salvador Dali, not Luis Bunuel. I was not familiar with the actor who played Bunuel, although I enjoyed his performance for the brief time he was in the film, as I did all the famous film directors, artists, and writers in *Midnight in Paris*.

And yes, Bunuel and Dali did work together at least once or twice, as someone mentioned notably on *Un Chien D'Andalou*. I also enjoyed the reference to Bunuel's film, *The Exterminating Angel* ( which at the time in the past in the movie, he hadn't made yet...)

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I havent paid to see an Allen film since the Soon Yi affair. After that I lost all respect for him. I'll watch them on TCM, since I'm not paying directly into his coffers........I used to be a huge fan.

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Everyone has a right to their opinion, as we all say so often around here. I for one never understood the vilification of Woody Allen over the Soon Yi / Mia Farrow events. My perspective was /is :

A) some of Mia's accusations concerning Allen were very extreme and based entirely on emotion. While , obviously, Allen was "carrying on" with Soon Yi, I do not believe he was guilty of any of the other innuendo / charges brought against him at the time.

B) Soon Yi, contrary to what the tabloids claimed, was over the age of 18 when her affair with Allen began.

C) I don't think about an artist's personal life when watching ( or reading, or listening to) their work. I disconnect the two.

That said, there are exceptions. For instance, I have trouble watching a Roman Polanski film without being a little creeped out.

But I do think that there was an over-reaction to the Allen/Soon YI/ Farrow "scandal" at the time, especially from women. I never shared and never understood the hatred/ condemnation of Allen over the whole thing.

If I'm going to diss Woody Allen, it would be over some of his sub-par movies he's made since then. (But even a "sub-par" Woody Allen film is better than many other cinematic efforts from others.)

 

footnote: As far as I have heard, Allen and Soon Yi are still happily married.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 13, 2011 2:21 PM

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I guess I'm the middle ground. I was a little weirded out by the controversy. But, like you, I disassociate the personal from the product.

 

Also like you, it's movies such as HOLLYWOOD ENDING, CURSE OF THE JADE SCORPION and the one with Larry David that make me reevaluate my opinion of Allen as a filmmaker.

 

Then I see clever, thoughtful stories like MATCH POINT, CASANDRA'S DREAM and ANYTHING ELSE and my faith is restored. For a while!

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On an ironic note, when Mia Farrow was a guest programmer on TCM a few years ago, one of the movies that she selected was . . . *THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL.*

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For some reason, I have not been able to respond to an individual when posting for some time. My reaction to it all was personal because Allen held himself up as some sort of paragon of virtue/reason in his films. I realized it was all a sham and could never see him in the same light again. The only way I could "vote" my opinion was at the boxoffice. I do miss his films, but I just wont see them or I should say PAY to see them. To me he's a hypocrite (one of the worst sins in my playbook)

 

Now someone like Polanski, I have no qualms about seeing his films, despite his personal behavior, because he never held himself up that way..........

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i can definitely see your point on that. i'm a big fan but he definitely took such a huge moral stance in his movies, that i can see where the hypocrisy came in.

 

and i don't really care that technically she was 18. he knew her since she was 10 and he was in a long-term relationship with her mother, who he also had children with. it was a majorly creepy thing to do

 

but i can put aside personal and product as well for the most part with these people, even polanski. although, i will say that his deed was much worse because it was an actual crime (drugging and **** a 13 year old child) and he never paid for it

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Sorry, didnt meant to hijack this thread with my comments. But I still feel betrayed after all these years.......also if Mia's memoirs are to believed, Allens behavior was suspicious to say the least regarding the child molestation charge (Dylan I believe). No charges were filed, but that doesnt mean nothing happened........

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This is a charming sweet romantic comedy fantasy Woody Allen obviously love Paris and the photography is stunning- the cast is first rate Owen Wilson as the Allen stand in and luminous Marion Cotilliard as his dream muse. This is literate witty script. I don't want to over praise it- but if you like classic Allen you will enjoy it- not a masterpiece like "Annie Hall" but an enjoyable time at the movies.

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First what movies, music, or arts I enjoy or not are not related to the personal lives of the creator of said work. I find that rather silly; e.g. Libs not wanting to watch a John Wayne movie, or cons a Robert De Niro one.

 

As for Allen and Soon Yi. It is my understanding that he lived in the same house as a father figure when she was under the age of 18 (i.e. a teen). So yes, while nothing occured prior to the age of 18 and thus nothing is illegal, I still feel it is creepy. Yea, that is the word; creepy.

 

It is fair to assume Allen used his power, wisdom, and intellect (which I really respect), to gain a sexual advantage over her. Thus to me the event is similar to the Clinton Monica one. So while I also don't understand the hate one would feel a little condemnation is well in order.

 

 

 

 

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This movie sounds really appealing to me. Does it contain any graphic violence, vomit, etc? I have a hard time watching these things, especially on the big screen. I have mixed feeling about Woody Allen's movies, some of them I really like, others I can't get into at all. I absolutely love The Purple Rose of Cairo, that is probably my favorite.

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Yes, Rehead, Purple Rose is one of my favorites too.

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I did see it. I'm a huge Woody Allen fan although his last two were pretty mediocre (Vicky Cristina Barcelona was the last good one). I have mixed feelings about MIDNIGHT IN PARIS. I love the scenery, the story is old but interesting, the supporting players are good, the script is witty and funny, but I still didn't entirely like it and I was wondering why. Then I realized it. The lead is totally miscast.

 

Owen Wilson is just all wrong for the part. First, quite frankly, you needed someone at least minimally attractive. That ain't Owen Wilson. I pretty much never got past that. I guess he was the Woody Allen "stand-in" so he had to be unattractive. It's the fantasy that Woody has lived his whole life: the ugly guy gets all the young, beautiful girls. It's been old for a long time.

 

I was picturing this movie with someone like George Clooney or Colin Farrell or any number of others. A more conventional leading man. So that really killed it for me.

 

But it was still enjoyable but good have been better with a real leading man.

 

Regards,

Terry

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Well, the thing with Soon-Yi was unseemly. My godmother was on the board of the building Woody was living in when this happened and it was a nightmare for them to deal with with the press all over. They finally asked them to leave the building which they eventually did.

 

Soon-Yi was, for all practical purposes, his step-daughter as his relationship with Mia Farrow was a common law marriage. So whether she was 18 or not is not relevant. It's still way beyond gross.

 

Having said that, Woody Allen is a great filmmaker and I would never allow my revulsion at his private choices to influence whether or not I'd go see his work. I separate art from the person without any problem.

 

Tom Hanks has led a fairly exemplary life. It doesn't make me want to see his films. It just doesn't work that way for me.

 

As Georg Solti once said "I'd conduct for Hitler if that was the only way to get a job" -- I'm paraphrasing .. but the point is made.

 

If I stopped going to see works of art because I objected to the way that the artist lived their life, pretty soon all I'd be going to see is cartoons.

 

Best,

Terry

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I like CURSE OF THE JADE SCORPION and HOLLYWOOD ENDING (probably because it pokes fun at his image and is about filmmaking).

 

The Larry David one was a bore and CASSANDRA's DREAM was awful. The one last year with Anthony Hopkins and Gemma Jones never came together.

 

He's hit or miss but I wouldn't miss anything he does.

 

Best,

Terry

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Let me get this right. You consider "hypocrisy" to be a greater crime than "rape?" Okay. Not sure what to say about that.

 

What Roman Polanski actually DID was far greater than any transgression of Woody Allen's. He's actually been convicted of a crime, one of the most serious crimes you can commit. And he's gotten away with it.

 

Woody Allen made a bad moral choice and he was punished by the public for it.

 

I see no comparison because Polanski is the far worse person here. I still go see his films but I'd have dinner with Allen; Polanski I wouldn't cross the street to spit on him.

 

Best,

Terry

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Hibi wrote, regarding the "Woody Allen / Soon Yi scandal" :

"...My reaction to it all was personal because Allen held himself up as some sort of paragon of virtue/reason in his films. I realized it was all a sham and could never see him in the same light again."

 

Don't get me wrong, I was surprised and, if I'm to be honest, disappointed in Woody Allen when this story first burst on the scene. It was particularly unnerving because Allen had always been fairly private, not giving many interviews, etc., and there was his face on the cover of the tabloids !

 

 

And I felt the same as you for a while, Hibi. But when you think about the films he made up to the time of the scandal ( for lack of a better word), they were more about examing the moral behaviour of human beings than about setting himself up as a moral paragon. The best Woody Allen movies raise questions, take an unflinching look at, moral and ethical behaviour. They are about people and how they behave, how they react to various morally ambiguous situations.

But, except for the sweet and thoughtful *Broadway Danny Rose,* Allen himself does not present his character as a model of moral behaviour. *Broadway Danny Rose,* one of my favourite Woody Allen movies, looks at a different aspect of human morality, that is, selfishness, how one person can betray another, someone who's helped them, in the name of "getting ahead". It's about gratitude and loyalty, two very moral qualities, and the lack of them in so many people, particularly the singer for whom Danny has worked so hard to succeed.

I'm going on like this about *Danny Rose* because I feel it's actually the only time in Allen's movies that he spells out a code about moral/ethical behaviour, and it is not about sexual misconduct, but an entirely different aspect of the range of human morality or lack of it.

 

 

The other thing I think of when people say Woody Allen presented himself as a morally virtuous person is the very funny scene in *Manhattan*, the one where he confronts his friend, (Michael Murphy) concerning the woman they both think they love. Murphy splutters, "You know, we're just people, we're not perfect, who do you think you are, God or something?"

Allen: "Well, I gotta model myself after someone."

They're both standing beside a skeleten, which somehow renders the scene even funnier.

 

 

Anyway, I think Woody Allen is making fun of both characters, the Murphy one for rationalizing his affair, for making lame excuses regarding both marital infidelity and betraying his friend in the name of love; but also the Allen character, for having the arrogance to think he can model himself after God.

 

 

Ok, sorry for the extremely long post. I just wanted to present the argument that I don't think Woody Allen was behaving hypocritically when he began an affair with Soon Yi. Besides what I just stated above, Allens' films are full of characters contemplating, fantasizing, and committing and justifying all kinds of sexual misbehaviour. If anything, it would be surprising if he'd led an irreproachably puritanical life, given the close attention his films pay to sex, both inside and outside of marriage, with both older and much younger partners.

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