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BasilBruce

The Clock

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I just watched the Clock with Robert Walker and Judy Garland. It was so lovely I cried and am about to cry just thinking about it. I read some reviews on Amazon and some people called it to sappy and unbelievable. Anyway I was wondering if Robert Walker did anything this good besides Strangers on a Train. Thanks

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It is unrealistic in general but we keep hearing that in WWII many such marriages occurred. A lot of people my age are products of them even if the courtship was longer than two days. I love how after that awful civil marriage they drop into the church and there make the vows again this time with reverence and sense of real commitment. You realize they mean what they've done and said and might make a go of it when he comes home. I imagine folks in their shoes got a lift out of it. I like the movie, too.

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This is a fine movie. Most of us are too young to know how people felt during WW2. The film is sentimental, but not offensive to the intelligence. Movie goers today are too callous for their own good. I'd rather be naive and happy!

 

 

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This movie hasn't been on since 2011???????

 

Movie goers today are too callous for their own good. I'd rather be naive and happy!

 

Good point, redriver. I wouldn't.

 

I am jaded and cynical and even I was appreciating the anvil LOVE!!! of the movie, BUT at the end, when Judy turned her head to the about to leave and he might be killed Wagner, I was blown away.

 

Can anyone explain the ending to me? They were married, they did show them having spent a night together, they did show them kiss on the mouth, WHY FOR THEIR LAST KISS DID SHE TURN HER FACE TO HIM?

 

Otherwise, you had to be dead not to get hit by the ISN'T LOVE WONDERFUL anvil of this movie.

 

Oh, but James and Mrs. Gleason were wonderful and glorious.

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>redriver wrote: This is a fine movie. Most of us are too young to know how people felt during WW2. The film is sentimental, but not offensive to the intelligence. Movie goers today are too callous for their own good. I'd rather be naive and happy!

 

I though THE CLOCK was a well-told story with characters who we learn about as the characters learn about each other. But reality? Watch THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES to see what happens to the whirlwind romance marriages after the war.

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When I was growing up I heard that the sudden quickie marriages were common during the War, but how common, I don't know. According to the movies, they were very common, but I don't know if that was true or not.

 

A big factor involved with the last-minute marriages before the guy goes off to war involves xxx. Many good girls could not do it without being married, and there was a feeling that the guy might not come back from the war, so there was an urge to do it before he went off to war, and, thus, they had to get married first.

 

The same goes for the movie stories too, although they had to cover the topic in different ways, and sometimes not so obviously, such as in The Clock. And in some movies, the real urge was mainly to do it rather than get tied up in a legal marriage. I think that might apply in The Clock, although it is certainly played down and is not obvious.

 

I think The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1944) was one of the most vulgar versions of this kind of film, and I don't understand how it got past the censors. The girl obviously got drunk and slept with some totally unknown stranger, whose name she didn't even know, yet with the midnight marriage ceremony added to the film, it did get past the censors.

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I totally agree with you about The Miracle of Morgan's Creek. It was vulgar to me, too. But, it was also stupid, insulted the viewers intelligence, and not the least bit funny. I never could see why it was given such raves. As far as I am concerned, it was a waste of time, talent, and money.

 

While I didn't think the Clock was realistic, I did think it represented how some young couples felt. I need to see it again and maybe rethink the realistic angle. Thanks for all the insight!

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"Sentimental, but not offensive to the intelligence." Perfect description. It's really the two leads who make this movie what it is, not to slight Vincente Minnelli. Judy Garland and Robert Walker were a match made in heaven, and their subtlety and ability to underplay kept the whole thing in balance. It could so easily have gone off the rails if these two hadn't been so grounded and believable.

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The Clock shows more of an innocent perspective I think on WWII marriage. I think if it had been released a year or two earlier then it would be better remembered. The Best Years of Our Lives barley beat out the Clock as my favorite film and while it is more realistic on a quickie marriage The Clock just fills me with hope.

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