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Guest TCMhost-Claire

Must See Movies

228 posts in this topic

Guest Clara_Keaton

ooooh I LOVE Lew Ayres! There's something about his warm, friendly face that makes me glad to be alive!! LOL

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Guest Lloyd, Rosemary

Must-have movies to me: Brief Encounter, Mildred Pierce, Humoresque, Possessed, Now Voyager, Keys of the Kingdom, The 10 Commandments, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, Joan of Paris, Best Years of Our Lives, It's a Wonderful Life, The Caine Mutiny, Casablanca, In a Lonely Place, The Blue Dahlia, Spartacus, South Pacific, Home from the Hill, To Kill a Mockingbird, How Green was My Valley, Battle Cry The Fountainhead and .... I'm sure there are many I have left out; these are just some of my favorites. It took them 10 years but Comcast finally got smart and got us TCM. I've been in 7th heaven ever since! Sincerely, Rosemary E. Lloyd, Elberon, NJ (MISSMOOHERSELF@Excite.com).

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Guest son, jery

Rosemary, I loved your list of favorite movies because so many of my all time favorites were on there: especially "Humoresque" which I watch every month. It's one of the great ones. I saw on the big screen at one of our movie revival houses in NYC ten years ago. Fabulous! The theater was jammed with Joan Crawford fans. And that fantastic music! At the end, we all jumped to our feet and screamed and clapped and shouted: "Bravo! Bravo!" One of the great experiences of my movie life! Write again!

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Guest Ross, Patrick

The ultimate movie for me is Citizen Kane! All the critics agree that this is the best film of all time. I just watched the DVD and I loved it!!! Highly recommended -- offers some great audio commentary which provides lots of addional behind the scenes info, that serves to justify why this is a great film! cheers! (http://www.angelfire.com/film/oscars/index.htm)

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Guest son, jery

Patrick, thanks for your take on the "Citizen Kane" DVD. I was going to check it out of our library this weekend. Now, I will certainly do so. I've never been a really big fan of "Kane" and have watched it several times. Orson Welles said in one interview that he copied some of his camera angles, ideas, from a fantastic silent film, "Cat and the Canary" (1928). I've got it on video and believe me, it's a knockout. You've never seen anything like the way the credits shimmer down from the top of the screen, the double exposures, etc. It's definitely worth a look.

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Guest Eldred, Jerry

FRANCES THE TALKING MULE.. I'm probably the strange one in the bunch, but I miss the Frances the Talking Mule series. Not the deepest material, but I enjoy it. I bought the VHS series, and have watched them all numerous times. A few other series that don't seem to get much press is the BLONDIE movie series. I don't know how many of them there are, but when they aired on that other old movie station, I filled up three tapes. The third series I enjoyed was MA & PA KETTLE series.

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Guest Eldred, Jerry

My twelve year old son likes anything starring Jimmy Stewart. If I weren't quite so absent minded, I could rattle off a number of good actors. I try to remember the actors he likes best, and when one of their movies comes on, I get him to watch them. He also loves good Cary Grant movies. We watched OPERATION PETTICOAT and FATHER GOOSE recently. Another one he enjoyed was MISTER ROBERTS.

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Guest K, Sandy

Jerry, when I was a kid, the local station used to show Blondie and Ma and Pa Kettle movies every Sunday. I LOVED them! Like your son, I, too, liked Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant when I was his age. (And still do!) For some reason, those two actors are very accessible and appealing to younsters.

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Guest Schaefer, William

I was seventeen and had seen very little in the way of old films when I chanced upon "42nd Street" late at night in 1983. From then on, I could not get enough of film history, particularly of the thirties. If a young person is to discover old films, I think he must find it on his own (he will resist less) and should discover what an escape they are. If putting present-day reality in the closet for a couple of hours is the need, a teenager can find his choice of alternatives in the movies of the past. Busby Berkeley happened to be my introduction--who knows what your son or daughter might find? You can certainly entice them with keeping books of old movie stars around--the personalities are timeless, and if one of them attracts, their movies (and others) will not be far behind.

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Guest son, jery

"Topper" from l938 with the glorious Constance Bennett and Gary Grant is the first movie I can remember seeing on TV back in the late 40s. I was thrilled with everything about it: the clothes, the way they talked, that long-gone glamour. I was probably five years old but to me it was a real eye-opener that revealed there was once a world of beautifully and very chic people.

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Guest K, Sandy

You know, I didn't realize it until I read your post, but one of the things that attracted me to classic films was a book that we had at my house called "Life Goes To The Movies." It was mainly photos, very little text, and I wore that book out! I loved looking at the pics of the stars and I eagerly began searching the tv guide for old films. This was back in the old days before we had cable and vcr's! The photo that I remember most clearly was a publicity shot of Judy Garland in all her finery leaning on a parasol from MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS. I waited YEARS to see that film. When it finally came out on video, I bought a copy, even though I didn't own a vcr!

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Guest Jessie

It's so hard being 17 and liking older movies. I just love the silent films and horror, though my fav. movie of all time is Freaks. None of my friends have seen these movies and when I force them to, they don't understand why I love them. They even tell me that a movie is bad when it's black and white.

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Guest Jessie

That's so true. I have tried to make my friends enjoy old movies and none of them have actually ended up liking them. I was flipping channels and found my favorite old movie. Maybe that's one of the reasons I love them.

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Guest walker, ken

Jessie, Hi! Believe me ,I share the same problem with some of my friends!I'm a lot older than you ,and my friends are also,but that doesn't stop me from enjoying my movies.You might tell them that some of our most famous directors chose to shoot their films in b&w.Sometimes on video tape its hard to see how good b&w photography really was! View the same film on DVD and you can see the difference. Oldies like "FRANKENSTEIN","BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN",are almost like watching them new,on DVD. I saw "Freaks" on cable Tv and thought it was very good.Try the Universal Monster series on tape or DVD.They offer some great titles.How about your top ten horror or silent movie list? I'd be interested to see it. kw

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Guest S., Tom

Topper Takes A Trip is a 1938 Hal Roach release with Constance Bennett, Roland Young, Billie Burke, and Alan Mowbray reprising their roles from the 1937 movie, Topper. Topper Takes A Trip is that rare sequel that is better than the original. It is also one of the most beautifully-realized fantasy films ever. It is closest to the literary genre of magical realism. Everything shimmers in this film: the performances, the cinematography, and the light, playful, wistful tone of the film. The score by Marvin Hatley is sweet, pastoral, light-hearted, even avant-garde in some places. Topper Takes A Trip is the most faithful of the three Topper films made of the source material, the Topper stories by Thorne Smith. Topper Takes A Trip outclasses and outshines more celebrated fantasy films such as Blithe Spirit and I Married A Witch.

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Guest S., Tom

Hi Ms. Hepburn: I've seen Topper Returns, at least, 4 times since I first saw it at approx. age 13. I am now 42. I enjoyed it very much and I agree it deserves a much wider viewing than it has now. I just posted a message about my favorite of the Topper films, Topper Takes A Trip. On Topper Returns, the wordplay between Billie Burke, Patsy Kelly, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, and Roland Young is hysterical. I believe the movie doesn't make use of Joan Blondell's talents but it is nice to see her in it. Hope to see Topper Returns soon on TCM. Bye.

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Guest son, jery

I wish TV would show some of those fantastic "Topper" movies. I'll never get over how stunning it was to watch the original "Topper" with Constance Bennett. Such glamor and class and wonderful photography. I watch my tape of "Topper Returns" over and over. One of the best comedies ever made.

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Guest olmsted, l

Jessie, I can totally relate. I'm 25, but I started watching the classics when I was about 12 or 13. Even if you're friends can't appreciate your favorites, here's a whole site you can come to and talk about them with others who feel the same way you do. Welcome to TCM!

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Guest son, jery

What makes "Topper Returns" so great is the knockout cast. You've got Patsy Kelly doing hysterical double-takes. Eddie Rochester (the chaffeur)is even more hysterical, especially those scenes with the seal. Billie Burke alone is worth the money and Roland Young is as always adorable. Joan Blondell looks really hot, in those great frocks she gets to wear. I loved the photography and music and great spooky mansion. Believe it or not, I found my VHS tape in a bargain bin at Woolworth's for just $2.75! Whatta bargain. And it looks great.

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Guest walker, ken

Just wanted to comment on an earlier post by Jery son concerning the silent version of "Cat and the Canary"[1928].The DVD version from Image offers the original theater score in excellent stereo.The titles are very funny and use a shivery effect.The double exposure used on the opening scene showing the old man and the cats is very effective,and sets the mood for the rest of the film.Cast and production values are top notch. Included on the DVD is a very funny Harold Lloyd short ,directed by Hal Roach,called "Spooks".

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Guest Hall, Amanda

Jessica, I am 20 years old and I looove old movies also. Everyone my age just doesn't understand it. I have people tell me all the time that they cant watch a movie with no color, I tell them the ones with no color are usually the best. I also enjoy The Women, some more of my favorites are Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Rear Window, and Mildred Pierce.

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Guest Schaefer, William

Was anyone amazed to see the Ernst Lubitsch Paramount film "Trouble In Paradise" on TCM last month? His early films have never been released on video, and being mostly Paramount titles, they're rarely shown. If TCM can get "Trouble In Paradise," it should be able to scare up "One Hour With You," "Love Parade" and "Monte Carlo," not to mention Rouben Mamoulian's Lubitch-like "Love Me Tonight." Now these are must-see films, and sadly, are among the least-seen major classics around.

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Guest K, Sandy

I wish that more Lubitsch was shown, too, William. I taped LOVE ME TONIGHT off AMC years ago-thank goodness, because I haven't seen it scheduled on ANY tv channel since. What is up with Paramount? Don't they know that there are lots of classic film fans out here?

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Guest Dan, Coffee

Maybe they are getting the point. When TROUBLE IN PARADISE aired on TCM, it opened with the modern Universal Studios fanfare before the familiar old Paramount mountain flashed on the screen. Since Universal studios controls the video and theatrical distribution rights for the older Paramount films, perhaps this means it may be coming to video soon. Maybe this airing on TCM was a dry run to see how well it would be received. Cross your fingers!

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Guest D., Joe

Speaking from experience, I was raised watching classic films from the age of 3, starting with Abbott and Costello and Laurel and Hardy. After falling in love with the classic comedies I started watching the MGM, Fred and Ginger, and Busby Berkeley musicals, and my interest in classic films just escalated from there. I am now 22, and classic films are a passion with me. If you want to get a child or even an adult interested in classic films, start with the comedies. Anyone enjoys a good laugh even if they aren't into classic films. "Hold That Ghost" is my favorite Abbott and Costello, and "Sons of the Desert" is perhaps the best Laurel and Hardy. The scene where Oliver's wife is throwing dishes at him from the kitchen will crack up anyone. And you can't go wrong with W.C. Fields, or any Marx Brothers film. And I agree that "Topper Returns" is one of the great classic comedies. The scene with all of them locked in the freezer is hysterical, as is the rest of the film.

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