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rohanaka

TCM Family Recipes

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Thanks, SansFin, for your Bread Recipe . . .

 

 

 

It sounds simple enough ! And the Coffee, Molasses and Cocoa added to it, sounds like a Rich & Robust Aromatic Bread . . . and Buttered too !? ... Mmmm I can Taste it now.

 

 

 

Just want to Clarify one thing :

 

 

 

Now the dough is placed in the Oven for *1 Hour.*

**After** the *1 Hour,* a metal bowl with water is placed for *20 minutes,*

**then taken out and bread is baked for another *30 minutes.*

So the Bread will have been in the Oven for a Total of* 1 Hour and 50 minutes ... is that Correct ?

Just wanted to clear that up for myself.

 

 

 

Thanks Much, SansFin, for your Help in this. :)

 

P.S.

And Thanks Much for that Video Link. I found it very interesting. And I enjoyed reading the Other Video Clips as well . . . A Lot of very Interesting Tips on Baking Bread !

 

Edited by: ugaarte on Dec 9, 2011 4:43 AM

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> {quote:title=ugaarte wrote:}{quote}Thanks, SansFin, for your Bread

> So the Bread will have been in the Oven for a Total of 1 Hour and 50 minutes ... is that Correct ?

> Just wanted to clear that up for myself.

 

It is in the oven for that long. It is baked only fifty minutes.

 

I turn the oven on to its lowest setting. I turn it off when it reaches temperature. Then I put the bread into the oven and leave the door open a little. The oven is so warm that it helps the bread to rise without cooking it. After an hour I turn the oven on again and reset the temperature to 375 degrees and put the water into the oven and close the door for baking.

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I *turn the oven on to its lowest setting. I turn it off when it reaches temperature. Then I put the bread into the oven and leave the door open a little. The oven is so warm that it helps the bread to rise without cooking it. After an hour I turn the oven on again and reset the temperature to 375 degrees and put the water into the oven and close the door for baking*

 

 

 

Okay, I understand Now . . . Thanks SansFin. I never thought about keeping the dough in the oven to help it Rise ... I looked around my kitchen wondering where the warmest place was to help my dough rise ... and I figured the warmest place would be the cabinet above my stove ... Never thinking about my actual OVEN !

 

 

(Okay ... gotta go now ... my son is here to use the computer ... talk back at you later ... )

 

 

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This thread reminded me of an entry I ran a few years ago at "Carole & Co." where Carole Lombard gave her recipe for barbecued spareribs. It was from a 1939 book called "What Actors Eat -- When They Eat." (Hey, if Eugenia can run a Stanwyck recipe, I need to give Lombard equal time!)

 

*Carole Lombard's barbecue spareribs*

 

*Here is a dish that I am sure everyone will like, and it doesn't require any course in cooking to prepare, if you follow the directions. Hot, it is swell, and when cold -— well, you'll just want to make enough to have a nibble, later.*

 

*3 to 5 lbs. spareribs*

 

*1/2 c. soy sauce*

 

*3/4 c. honey*

 

*2 tsp. prepared mustard*

 

*1 clove garlic*

 

*1/4 c. water*

 

*2 Tbs. flour*

 

*Combine one-half cup soy sauce, three-fourths cup honey, two teaspoons prepared mustard and one clove of finely chopped garlic. Mix well together. Place three to five pounds of spareribs in a roasting pan, pour the sauce over the ribs, cover and place in oven. Bake at three hundred degrees for two hours or more. Remove ribs from the pan (be sure to stir occasionally while cooking to make sure all the ribs are covered with the sauce). Drain off all the fat, with the exception of about two tablespoons. Add one-fourth cup of water to the remaining liquid and cook on top of the stove until well-blended, then add two tablespoons of flour mixed with a little water and cook until the sauce is thickened. Replace the spareribs in the pan with the gravy, and stir. Return to oven to keep hot until serving time.*

 

The entry is at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/204782.html.

 

Lombard also apparently contributed a recipe (though I don't know what it's for) to a charity cookbook in the early '30s issued by the Beverly Hills Woman's Club. You can find out more at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/467636.html.

 

Finally, here's a recipe for one of Hollywood's most famous dishes -- one enjoyed by many a star, possibly including Lombard and Stanwyck. I'm referring to Chasen's renowned chili. The restaurant may be gone; the recipe lives on:

 

*Chasen's chili*

 

*1/2 pound dried pinto beans*

*water*

*1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice*

*1 large green bell pepper, chopped*

*2 tablespoons vegetable oil*

*3 cups onions, coarsely chopped*

*2 cloves garlic, crushed*

*1/2 cup parsley, chopped*

*1/2 cup butter*

*2 pounds beef chuck, coarsely chopped*

*1 pound pork shoulder, coarsely chopped*

*1/3 cup Gebhardt's chili powder*

*1 tablespoon salt*

*1 1/2 teaspoons pepper*

*1 1/2 teaspoons Farmer Brothers ground cumin*

 

*1. Rinse the beans, picking out debris. Place beans in a Dutch oven with water to cover. Boil for two minutes. Remove from heat. Cover and let stand one hour. Drain off liquid.*

*2. Rinse beans again. Add enough fresh water to cover beans. Bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for one hour or until tender.*

*3. Stir in tomatoes and their juice. Simmer five minutes. In a large skillet saute bell pepper in oil for five minutes. Add onion and cook until tender, stirring frequently. Stir in the garlic and parsley. Add mixture to bean mixture. Using the same skillet, melt the butter and saute beef and pork chuck until browned. Drain. Add to bean mixture along with the chili powder, salt, pepper and cumin.*

*4. Bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for one hour. Uncover and cook 30 minutes more or to desired consistency. Chili shouldn't be too thick -- it should be somewhat liquid but not runny like soup. Skim off excess fat and serve.*

 

*Makes 10 cups, or six main dish servings.*

 

Having lived in the D.C. area for many years, I am partial to Hard Times Cafe, which makes several varieties of chili -- Texas, Cincinnati, Terlingua, even vegetarian. The chain sells spices mixes, enabling you to create your own at home (a good gift for any ex-Washingtonian who misses home -- Hard Times' locations include Verizon Center for its many events and Nationals Park for baseball games).

 

Happy dining to all!

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I just reread my rum cake recipe and see that I wrote one cup butter for the glaze when I meant 1 stick or 1/2 cup. There's enough calories already without needing any more.

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SF: I bet that bread recipe has a nice strong flavor to it.. but oh, I am afraid of yeast. ha. (which is a terribly debilitating condition for someone who loves all things "bread" ha). But I finally got lucky and my folks bought me a bread machine and really enjoy it. Though I imagine I would not have much luck trying to adapt your recipe to that machine.. it came w/ a whole slew of recipes.. but I STILL can't get over my yeast-o-phobia.. ha. So I just use box mixes.. alas. (still good though.. they have a lot of varieties to choose from)

 

VP.. thanks for giving Carole's recipe its moment in the kitchen.. and thanks for the chili recipe too.. I can see it now.. the TCM family CHILI cookoff.. hmmmm.... HOW could we ever do the judging???

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*...I am afraid of yeast.* - roh

 

Why the fear of yeast? The days of proofing yeast are long gone. The stuff they make now can be mixed in with the dry ingredients with no fear of failure. Unfortunately, they have also taken away the wonderful aroma and flavor that first drew me to breadmaking waaaay back in kindergarten. I've gone from making bread for every other meal years ago to making hamburger buns once a month now. :-(

 

And don't get me started on tomatoes, watermelons, apples, cantaloupes...bleah. The food industry has killed those too.

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Why the fear of yeast?

 

Well, Smileys.. I think it is all about "ignorance" ha. I never TRIED baking w/ yeast because I was afraid of it. And I did that for so long that now I am afraid of it.. because I never TRIED it.. ha. (go figure)

 

My mom was not a huge bread baker when I was growing up... except for once a year over Christmas she'd bake her delightful(most wonderful, truly addictive and HEARTBREAKINGLY delicious potato rolls.. but alas.. she has not baked those in over 35 years or so. (oh the poor deprived grandkids.. they have NO idea their grandma used to bake bread, ha)

 

But that was about the extent of my breadbaking education way back when.. just watching HER worry over the yeast (probably because HER mother did not bake bread too often) and it just sort of formed an impression on me that "Gee.. this bread-making stuff is HARD".. ha. So I never let myself try it..

 

(Good golly, I am slow to give up my child hood fears. ha... I only JUST got over my fear of puff pastry about 5 years ago when I found out you can buy it frozen in sheets.. and all you have to do is thaw and bake it..ha. I used to think you had to be some sort of master CHEF to know the secrets to that stuff.. and now.. I cook with it a lot. OH the worlds it has opened up for me!! ha... so MAYBE there is hope for me on the yeast front.. maybe. someday.. perhaps.. could be.. possibly.. but you never know. ha)

 

And don't get me started on tomatoes, watermelons, apples, cantaloupes...bleah. The food industry has killed those too

 

I agree.. Almost pretty much gotta grow your own w/ those. (if you want them to taste the way you want them to taste.. )

 

Meanwhile. maybe SOMEDAY I'll get adventurous and do some sort of "from scratch" bread dough.. just to see if I can do it.

 

But for now I am just glad for that bread machine.. it may not be as TOTALLY perfect as a really good loaf of homebaked bread... but it is not bad. (and the upside is you get that whole "baked bread" smell going on all over the house.. ahhh)

 

On the downside, though.. with a bread machine.. no matter how good the bread smells while it is baking.. I doubt I'll ever get to have a Hondo "you baked bread today" moment from my beloved QT... ha..

 

Alas... :D

 

hondo78-1.jpg

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*Meanwhile. maybe SOMEDAY I'll get adventurous and do some sort of "from scratch" bread dough.. just to see if I can do it.* - roh

 

Well, here you go then. From my archives, the simple recipe that was made by twenty kindergarteners and our nasty little hands back in 1968 at Kirtland Elementary. Really, I still have it. The white index card is now yellow. I've amended parts of the recipe for clarity.

 

 

Pat's Rolls

 

 

Mix and beat 1 package yeast, 1 cup lukewarm water, and 3 eggs until foamy. Add 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup oil, 1 tsp salt, and continue mixing as you gradually add 4 1/2 cups flour. Knead dough on floured board until not sticky. Put in greased bowl, cover, and let rise 1 hour. Work it down, back in the greased bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and put in refrigerator until ready for use, up to one week.

 

 

Form into rolls and place in greased muffin pan. Let rise in warm place (length of time depends on whether they were refrigerated), brush with oil or butter, and bake at 375 F for 20 minutes.

 

 

There are two aromas from my childhood that are near and dear to my heart: jet fuel, and these rolls, prior to around 1990. Now, if only I could find some of that 1968 yeast on eBay.

 

Edited by: smileys on Dec 13, 2011 11:38 PM

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VP.. thanks for giving Carole's recipe its moment in the kitchen.. and thanks for the chili recipe too.. I can see it now.. the TCM family CHILI cookoff.. hmmmm.... HOW could we ever do the judging???

 

I've been given two more Lombard recipes, both for soups, from the 1930 edition of "Fashions And Foods In Beverly Hills." (This may have been supplied to the book's editors in late 1929, as Lombard lists herself as a "Pathe player"; late that year, she was dismissed from the roster, likely for too closely resembling new acquisition Constance Bennett).

*_________________________________________*

 

*TWO GOOD SOUPS NOT OFTEN PREPARED*

 

I am going to offer two good soup recipes, which will be novel to many housewives, I think, and a welcome change from the standard varieties. One is for lettuce soup and the other for spinach soup.

 

To make lettuce soup cook several good heads of lettuce, from which the outer leaves have been removed, with three cupfuls of milk. A double boiler is best, and the lettuce should be cooked in the milk about 20 minutes. Mix together 2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 tablespoons flour and a teaspoon chopped onions. Add to the lettuce and milk, stirring constantly. Season with salt and pepper and cook in double boiler ten minutes.

 

For spinach soup, mix together 2 tablespoons butter, 4 tablespoons flour, 2 tablespoons grated cheese, salt and pepper. Add two cups of milk, 2 cups of water and one cup of cooked spinach. Let simmer for about twenty minutes over a slow fire.

 

Carol Lombard (Pathe Player).

*_________________________________________*

 

At this stage of her life, Lombard was still living with her mother and two older brothers on 138 North Wilton Street (the residence still exists), and she may have made these recipes at home.

 

I'm not much for lettuce myself, but eat my share of spinach-related products (including salads). This soup might have some possibilities.

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Smileys, I love a man who can bake!

 

I have wondered why my homemade bread doesn't taste (or smell) the same as it did when my mom used to make it.

 

She was a brilliant bread baker, and the wheat bread was absolutely the best. It would make you crazy with hunger as it was baking, you wanted to eat it so badly! The whole house smelled like heaven. Then she'd take it out of the oven and you had to wait to eat it.

 

Her rye bread was always a trouble to her. Though we could never tell the difference, she would curse the rye dough for not rising properly. It tasted good and the texture always seemed fine to us.

 

I had yeast fear myself until a year or so ago when I went online to the King Arthur Flour website and read up on it. I got one from them, SAF Red Instant Yeast that I keep in the freezer, in a plastic bag. I use a spoonful at a time when baking. It's foolproof. It costs 6 dollars for a package that will last forever. I've barely dented it and have made bread about 20 times so far. You don't have to do anything to this yeast, just throw it in with the other ingredients. If you want it to work a little bit faster and better, I mix it with a little of the warm water and some sugar in a cup first, before adding it to the flour and salt. It's so exciting to see it bubble!

 

I have a great recipe for french bread, which I made every week last winter. It's not hard, but you have to be home all day to make it. I have a rising bucket with a lid, but a large oiled bowl will do. Also, it's good to have a lot of clean dish towels handy to place over the dough as it rises. You can also use them as dividers when you are letting your individual loaves rise.

 

 

Ingredients

 

5 - 5 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

2 1/2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast (or 5-5 1/2 teaspoons SAF Yeast

 

2 teaspoons salt

2 cups warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)

1 tablespoon cornmeal (I skip this)

1 egg white

1 tablespoon water

 

if you want a darker crust, skip the tablespoon of water and use a lot of egg white. Fresh eggs from a farm work the best, they have larger, more liquid whites.

 

 

Directions

 

In a large bowl, combine 2 cups flour, yeast and salt. Stir in 2 cups warm water, and beat until well blended using a stand mixer with a dough hook attachment. Using a wooden spoon, stir in as much of the remaining flour as you can.

 

On a lightly floured surface, knead in enough flour to make a stiff dough that is smooth and elastic. Knead for about 8 to 10 minutes total. Shape into a ball. Place dough in a greased bowl, and turn once. Cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled.

 

Punch dough down, and divide in half. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Cover, and let rest for 10 minutes. Roll each half into large rectangle. Make sure the rectangle is no longer that the length of your baking sheet or french bread pan. Roll up, starting from a long side. Moisten edge with water and seal. Taper ends.

 

Grease a large baking sheet. Sprinkle with cornmeal. Place loaves, seam side down, on the prepared baking sheet. Lightly beat the egg white with 1 tablespoon of water, and brush on. Cover with a damp cloth. Let rise until nearly doubled, 35 to 40 minutes.

 

With a very sharp knife, make 3 or 4 diagonal cuts about 1/4 inch deep across top of each loaf. Bake in a preheated 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) oven for 20 minutes. Brush again with egg white mixture. Bake for an additional 15 to 20 minutes, or until bread tests done. If necessary, cover loosely with foil to prevent over browning. Remove from baking sheet, and cool on a wire rack.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Dec 14, 2011 11:18 AM

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It makes two medium baguettes or three small ones.

It really is delicious! I usually had it done by 3 or 4 in the afternoon, when Alice came home from school. We'd demolish one of the loaves before dad got home, then the other would be eaten with dinner.

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It is sad to say I can not find my book of recipes I collected in the 1970s. I have been forced to look to published cookbooks for some I like.

 

I wished to share my recipe for Mock-Turtle Soup. I looked in The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book by Fannie Merritt Farmer edition of 1899 to see if the recipe was similar. The first ingredient listed is: "1 calf's head". I know my recipe did not call for that.

 

I wished to share my recipe for Beef Soup. I looked in Lowbush Moose by Gordon R. Nelson. The only recipe I could find which is at all similar begins with the ingredient: "2 pounds ground moose".

 

Trooper Nelson does have a recipe which is almost identical to one I know. The recipe is different only in that he uses parsley while I prefer rosemary:

 

*Potato Chowder*

 

2 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onion

 

3 cups water

4 cups potatoes cut as 1/4 inch cubes

2 cups carrots cut as 1/4 inch cubes

1 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon pepper

 

1 13-ounce can evaporated milk

1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary or parsley

 

Saute onions in butter until tender.

Add water, potatoes, carrots, salt and pepper.

Boil twenty minutes.

Stir in milk and rosemary.

Heat without boiling ten minutes.

 

I do not remember the source of this recipe:

 

***** Soup*

 

Clean and dress one Woodpecker in a manner similar to the preparation of a Guinea Hen.

Place in a large kettle of cold water.

Bring to a boil quickly.

Reduce heat and simmer until all the wood is gone.

 

I hope you enjoy it! ;)

 

Trooper Nelson has a recipe for meatloaf which I have tried and which I like very much:

 

*White Cube Meat Loaf*

 

2 cups potatoes boiled fifteen minutes and cut into 1/4 cubes. I use canned diced potatoes.

2 pounds ground beef or moose. I always use beef.

2 beaten eggs

1 8-ounce can tomato sauce

1 cup chopped onions

1 glove minced garlic

1/4 cup finely chopped celery. I always leave this out.

1.5 teaspoons salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 cup bread crumbs

1 teaspoon crumbled rosemary

8 slices bacon cut into four-inch-long pieces

 

Mix well meat, eggs, tomato sauce, onions, garlic, celery, salt, pepper, bread crumbs and rosemary.

Mix in potatoes gently be hand.

Shape meat into oval loaf about three inches thick.

Place in baking dish. Lay bacon strips across top.

Bake ninety minutes at 350 degrees.

Let it rest twenty minutes before cutting.

 

I like to place thickly sliced potatoes in the bottom of the dish and I lay the meatloaf on top of it for baking. They cook in the juices which run from it.

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Hiya smileys...

Well, here you go then

 

OK, sir.. you've convinced me.. I will take the challenge. HA. Because HEY.. I do love a good dinner roll..

 

(But oh good gravy.. what's this?? There's kneading??? KNEADING??? Did I ever mention that one of the OTHER things I am usually afraid to try in the kitchen is.. KNEADING??.ha. I tend to avoid any and all recipes that call for KNEADING because ugh.. most of them involve yeast.. ha.. and besides that.. I never know how MUCH I need to KNEAD. ha.(because any time I watch a cooking show where they are kneading something they say stuff like, "don't OVERwork your dough.. UGH!!) How much work is OVER work?? They never tell you THAT part... oh me..

 

But enough is enough. I am out of excuses.. so now I will try.. no really.. I will.. I promise.

 

I will be off from work for a couple of weeks later this month.. I will make a POINT of.. gulp... buying some YEAST. I mean.. here you tell me it is so easy a KINDERGARTENER can do it.. so now I HAVE to, ha.. or five year olds the world over will be sticking out their tongues at me in the bread aisle and saying "nah, nah, nah" with a mocking tone if I refuse.. .ha.

 

I will report back.. someday soon.. I hope.. no really.. I will.. (did I mention.. GULP???)

 

There are two aromas from my childhood that are near and dear to my heart: jet fuel, and these rolls, prior to around 1990. Now, if only I could find some of that 1968 yeast on eBay

 

Isn't it funny how certain smells recall days gone by. I love that. (but good luck w/ finding THAT on eBay.. I bet you'd almost have an easier time finding the jet fuel.. ha) :-)

 

 

 

PS: Jackie.. I have a rising bucket with a lid

 

Et TU Ms Favell?? ha.. Oh me.. you are an inspiration.. does Alice bake bread with you too??? Can I get a tutorial??? ha.. Seriously.. I LOVE a good french bread.. and I with Miss Maven.. bring on the butter..

 

PS: SF... potatoes and meatloaf in the same recipe.. what's not to love. That sounds delish. (and your potato soup recipe is similar to my own except I use SAGE instead of Rosemary.. (ha, to each his own) and I also add some diced kielbasa in there as well.. gotta love a good potato soup.

 

But really.. woodpecker?? People EAT those.. no way...

 

PS VP.. thanks for more Carole recipes. The spinach sounds more "tryable" than the lettuce.. ewww... just the THOUGHT of lettuce soup.. kinda scary isn't it??? But who am I to say..

 

Thanks everyone, for stopping by the kitchen.

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Dec 14, 2011 8:23 PM

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*There's kneading??? KNEADING???* - roh

 

Think of it as a way to take out all the frustrations from your day. I still have sticks for arms, so you probably won't be developing arms like a linebacker. And remember to take off any rings that might break teeth when you're eating the bread. :-)

 

Time depends on the size of your dough. I rarely knead longer than 10 minutes, sometimes only 5 if it's a tiny recipe. And you really can't over-knead dough by hand, your arms would give out first.

 

If you're really terrified, you can still use the bread machine to knead it, then take it out to rise. Or use a mixer with a dough hook.

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*Her rye bread was always a trouble to her. Though we could never tell the difference, she would curse the rye dough for not rising properly. It tasted good and the texture always seemed fine to us.* - JF

 

Wow, and I thought it was just me. Rye and even whole wheat gave me fits. Half the time I'd end up with a wide, flat loaf rather than a nice rounded one. I usually just make light ryes and wheats for that reason.

 

Hmmm, now I'm hungry for my old prosciutto-onion bread. Must...find...recipe...

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Woodpecker??? I could never get Woody's image out of my head!

 

I think I'll stick to your potato chowder and meatloaf! ;-)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> I will make a POINT of.. gulp... buying some YEAST.

 

You may wish to explore the world of sourdough. It lets you handle the yeast only once when you make the starter. From that time forward you simply use a certain amount of the starter in a recipe.

 

In Lowbush Moose by Gordon R. Nelson he gives instructions on making the starter:

 

2.5 cups lukewarm water

1 package active dry yeast

3 cups all-purpose or whole wheat flour

 

Pour the water into a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast on top of the water and wait five minutes. Gradually add the flour, stirring a little at a time. When all the flour is in, beat the mixture vigorously until it is smooth. Pour the batter into your jar or crock and cover lightly with aluminum foil. Set in a warm place for twenty-four hours. If the yeast is active, you'll have a good, bubbling starter.

 

He says he keeps his starter in the refrigerator in a gallon mayonnaise jar. He says a nice neat crock with a cover would also be fine.

 

To make his sourdough bread:

 

First Day

1 cup sourdough starter

2 cups lukewarm water

2.5 cups flour

 

Place the starter in a large bowl and add the water and flour. Set the bowl, well covered, in a warm place and leave it there for twenty-four hours.

 

Second Day

4 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

3 tablespoons sugar

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Butter

 

Into the bowl of bubbling dough that you prepared the previous day place all ingredients except the butter. Mix until the batter is smooth and the flour is completely absorbed.By now you should be able to lift the dough out of the bowl in one piece. If you can't, work in another 1/2 cup flour until the dough is firm.

Now lift the dough onto a well-floured board and knead the dough for ten minutes; then shape it into a ball and drop it into a buttered bowl, turn it once, and cover with a towel. Put in a warm place for two and a half hours.

Turn the dough out onto the board again, punch it down, cut in half, and roll and shape the pieces into long loaves. Place the loaves on a buttered cookie sheet, drape with a towel and set in a warm place to rise again. In about an hour the loaves should double in size and be ready to bake.

Bake at 375 degrees for an hour. Slide the finished loaves onto a rack to cool, but try and serve while they are still warm.

 

I have not made this recipe. I have used many others from his cookbooks and they are all excellent unless I do a foolish thing.

 

I should explain about Trooper Nelson and his unusual cookbooks. He was a State Trooper in Alaska for many years. His recipes are ones he collected from all over the state. His cookbooks are only about one-third recipes. The rest are tales of his youth and his family and fishing and hunting. They are both heart-warming and hilarious.

 

The title Lowbush Moose refers to the thinking that there are two types of moose in Alaska. The huge beasts with antlers which are hunted by people with high-powered rifles are Highbush moose. The ones which are hunted by adventurous boys armed with .22 caliber rifles are Lowbush moose which non-Alaskans call rabbits.

 

We also have his book Smokehouse Bear I am sad to say that it only has one mention of smoked bear meat.

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>Hmmm, now I'm hungry for my old prosciutto-onion bread. Must...find...recipe...

 

Yes you must! And be sure to print it here when you do find it! Yum.

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Ro...since you're the leader of this motley crew, I'll address this to you...(but all may jump in).

 

 

Dear Rohanaka,

 

I think you need a TCM Cooking Show. And since I'm a filmmaker, I guess I'll fly to each of your posters' kitchens and watch them bake their favorite recipes. (Of course nibbling and sampling as I shoot).

 

I'll film each poster, from start-to-finish...go to the next poster's house and do the same and so on and so forth. Then when I've got one dish from each of you, we pick a specific neutral location, EVERYONE bringing their favorite dish, and we ALL sit down to a nice hearty home-cooked meal.

 

And of course...talk about Movies.

 

Yes, Robert is invited, if he can make it. What's your dish and where d'ya live??? "TCM's CHAT 'N CHEW" Sign-In Sheet is just a PM away, folks.

 

Sincerely,

 

Cine-Chef

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> And since I'm a filmmaker, I guess I'll fly to each of your posters' kitchens and watch them bake their favorite recipes. (Of course nibbling and sampling as I shoot).

 

You are very welcome in my kitchen. You should know that the rule is that cooks nibble and sample. Watchers wash the pots. :) I have been given a set of true Chinese cleavers. I use the 2.5 pound one to reduce a rack of ribs to bite-size for stir-frying in less than five minutes. I can also use it to teach stray fingers to not sneak tasty bits. ;)

 

If you do not like vodka or rum you will have to bring your own libations. There will be wine or sherry here only when it is needed for a recipe.

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