Sign in to follow this  
michelponting

Favorite War Character

125 posts in this topic

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Capt. Cassidy: There's lots of Mikes dying right now. And a lot more Mikes will die. Until we wipe out a system that puts daggers in the hands of five-year-old children.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Destination Tokyo

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Jake in the Heartland

dt13.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post.gif

>General Frank Savage: (Addressing the 918th for the first time at 0800) *There will be a briefing for a practice mission at 1100 this morning. That's right, practice. I've been sent here to take over what has come to be known as a hard luck group. Well, I don't believe in hard luck. So we're going to find out what the trouble is. Maybe part of it's your flying, so we're going back to fundamentals. But I can tell you now one reason I think you've been having hard luck. I saw it in your faces last night. I can see it there now. You've been looking at a lot of air lately... and you think you ought to have a rest. In short, you're sorry for yourselves. I don't have a lot of patience with this, "What are we fighting for?" stuff. We're in a war, a shooting war. We've got to fight. And some of us have got to die. I'm not trying to tell you not to be afraid. Fear is normal. But stop worrying about it and about yourselves. Stop making plans. Forget about going home. Consider yourselves already dead. Once you accept that idea, it won't be so tough. Now if any man here can't buy that... if he rates himself as something special, with a special kind of hide to be saved... he'd better make up his mind about it right now. Because I don't want him in this group. I'll be in my office in five minutes. You can see me there.*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thedesertratsmalky100co.jpg

 

This is not for children.

 

The Desert Rats

 

Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FL4.jpg

 

Ryan to The Duke, one of the best scenes in the movie, not this one:

 

I gotta belly full of you and I'm not buying the billy goods you're selling. I hope you will say let's take off these insignia and step out in the boondocks and get it settled.

 

Flying Leathernecks -- Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P-51-cadillac-of-the-sky.jpg

 

Wah, ha ha! Go! P-51, Cadillac of the sky!

 

Empire of the Sun

 

*Jake in the Heartland*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post.gif

>Jane Deborah Hilton: *It's so wonderful being at the hospital. I wish you could come and visit.*

>

>Mrs. Anne Hilton: *I will.*

>

>Jane Deborah Hilton: *But some of it's so sad. If you could see those boys. And they're so cheerful, most of them.*

>

>Mrs. Anne Hilton: *I know. They have such courage. I like to think that you have that kind of courage, too, darling.*

>

>Jane Deborah Hilton: *What are you trying to tell me?*

>

>Mrs. Anne Hilton: *That when a man goes off to war, we have to be -*

>

>Jane Deborah Hilton: *It's Bill!*

>

>Mrs. Anne Hilton: *The telegram came just a few minutes ago. It was addressed to you, but I opened it.*

>

>Jane Deborah Hilton: *Did it say he was missing, or what? I don't care if he's wounded, I don't care what's happened to him, if only -*

>

>Mrs. Anne Hilton: *No, dear, it said he... it said he died in action at Salerno.*

Jennifer Jones, Claudette Colbert

Since You Went Away

(1944)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thumbnail.aspx?q=1515983541166&id=152634thumbnail.aspx?q=1505240817090&id=0ac423

 

We're not fighting men anymore. We're fighting animals.

 

The Fighting Seabees

 

Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

robert-D.-napalm_thumb.jpg

 

249263-240x300.jpg

 

I love the smell of napalm in the morning.

 

Apocalypse Now

 

Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*Jack Palance* as Lt. Joe Costa, Fox company *in 1956’s Attack*!

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:Arial}"Listen to me, Cooney! If you put me and my men in a wringer - -if you send us out there and let us hang - -I swear, I swear by all that's holy, I'll come back. I'll come back and take this grenade and shove it down your throat and pull the pin!”

{font}{font:Arial}

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font}

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winston Churchill.

 

I love British war movies when they play audio of Churchill giving inspirational speeches on the radio.

 

Here are some of his recordings:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjuiMuvHojQ

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsKDGM5KTBY

 

 

 

I think some of his existing recordings are the original ones of his original radio broadcasts in the early 1940s, but I also think he made some re-recordings after the war, of some of his famous earlier speeches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred, I'm sure you have visited otrcat.com and all the recordings of Churchill's speeches available .....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks fred. I didn't know about that site. I just looked it up.

 

Back in the 1970s British actor Norman Shelley admitted that he made some recordings for the BBC, impersonating Churchill. He said he did it for several reasons. 1) Churchill was too busy, 2) the British wanted to confuse the Nazis about the true location of Churchill, and 3) because some messages were needed to go on the radio rather quickly.

 

But I think I can tell them apart. By studying newsreel film and audio of the real Churchill, he sounds more "slurpy", almost like he is drooling as he speaks. While Shelley sounds more like an actor reading someone else's speech.

 

Fascinating stuff. I've always admired the wartime British for their bravery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to help out. They have a wonderful selection of radio shows from the golden age. I like the part about Shelley removing his false teeth to make him sound more like Winnie..... :^0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>gettysburg.jpg

 

Jake, maybe you can tell me something I've been trying to figure out.

 

During the big civil war battles, why did all the men on both sides line up, side by side, in front of the opposing army? Seems to me that would be the best way to get oneself shot for sure. Anyone who aimed into a line and fired a shot would be sure to hit someone. This is why the death rate was so high during those battles.

 

Why didn't they hide behind trees, in trenches, etc?

 

Lining up like that goes back to Roman times, but that was when combat was hand to hand and men had to be just 2 feet in front of one another to strike the enemy with a sword.

 

But long after the invention of rifles, why would any army line up in an open field, side by side, when they were being fired at?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*During the big civil war battles, why did all the men on both sides line up, side by side, in front of the opposing army? Seems to me that would be the best way to get oneself shot for sure. Anyone who aimed into a line and fired a shot would be sure to hit someone. This is why the death rate was so high during those battles.*

 

Hi Fred,

 

Think West Point. Both South and North generals were steeped in European style fighting tactics and strategies. General Lee studied Napoleon and other great European generals. The left and right flanks with a center were the positions that must be broken down to defeat an army.

 

There were battles such as Shiloh at the Hornets Nest fought in a wooded terrain but still the losses were over 20,000 thousand plus.

 

Lee and Grant met in the Wilderness in the latter part of the war in wooded terrain with losses also 20,000 plus.

 

Stonewall Jackson did use guerilla tactics with far fewer men than the Union forces in the Valley Campaign with great success. He used surprise tactics at Chancellorsville by having his men surprise the Union force when the South came out of the woods to panic the Northern forces.

 

Not till the latter part of the War did it become a siege affair with ditches and trenches and barbed wire.

 

Although Vicksburg did fall to Grant, after a siege was placed on the city, only after the citizens were living in caves and eating rats did Gen. Pemberton surrender to Grant.

 

*Lining up like that goes back to Roman times, but that was when combat was hand to hand and men had to be just 2 feet in front of one another to strike the enemy with a sword.*

 

*But long after the invention of rifles, why would any army line up in an open field, side by side, when they were being fired at?*

 

The style of fighting did allow for armies to meet and again apply old tactics. We scratch our heads today and wonder why?

 

It was the custom and the way to wage war. Not till the latter part of the War did that change when the North adopted a Total War concept where even civilians were at risk.

 

Gen. Lee did not originally pick Gettysburg as his first place to meet the North but circumstances dictated the battle be fought there after the Rebel and Union forces met and encountered fierce fighting.

 

Gen. Lee desperately wanted a victory at Gettysburg to win European approval and break Lincoln with a defeat that would discourage Northern support.

 

Gen Lee has been criticized for Pickett's Charge sending 12000 men across open terrain to break the Union center at Gettysburg.

 

I do not. I believe he was badly served by his Generals who did not carry out his plan with alacrity and force. He sorely missed Stonewall Jackson who was accidentally killed at Chancellorsville.

 

Not all the fighting at Gettysburg was in open terrain. Little Round Top and Culps hill saw fierce fighting with some of it hand-to-hand.

 

Had the South won, things might be very different today. And they came very close to winning the battle even with all the mishaps.

 

Have a great weekend.

 

P.S.

 

Noted historian James McPherson found when he researched the reasons the ordinary soldier fought in The War Between the States for the respective sides it was to hold the Union together for the Northern soldier believing his ancestors left him the country he knew and it was to defend his homeland from invasion and the right for Independence for the Southern soldier as he believed his ancestors had left to him.

 

 

 

Edited by: JakeHolman on Feb 17, 2012 9:36 PM

 

Edited by: JakeHolman on Feb 18, 2012 12:40 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us