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Guest Dan, Coffee

Guilty Pleasures!!!

108 posts in this topic

Guest Dan, Coffee

Briefly put, these are the films that are so bad, they're good. It can be anything like PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE, SANTA CLAUS CONQUERS THE MARTIANS, or REEFER MADNESS, to Japanese sci-fi, cheesy special effects, grade-Z horror flicks, overwrought melodrama, anything directed by Ed Wood -- you name it! And don't forget that the best films can have their "GP" moments too! Post your favorite films, scenes, or lines -- if you feel guilty loving it, get it off your chest here!

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Guest Dan, Coffee

I'll start off with LIGHTS OF NEW YORK (1928), the first all-talking film. It's a gangster yarn about two barbers from the sticks who set up a shop in the big city, which a local gang uses as a front for a liquor operation. Bad acting, weird lighting, flat-footed chorus girls, cheap sound effects -- it's all here. "Crude" doesn't begin to describe it. And being an early sound film, it's great for an informal game of "Spot the Microphone." In some of the shots, the actors are grouped so close together, you think they're going to burst into "Sweet Adeline" at any moment! With the exceptions of Eugene Pallette and Tom Dugan, I don't think any actor in this film went anywhere after its release. One of my favorite GP lines comes from SATANIC, a klunky spy movie from the 1960s, where one of the villains says to the heroine, "You have very attractive legs -- and a nice hat to go with them." HUH??

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Guest walker, ken

I'll probably take some hits on this,but the final moments of "Duel in the Sun" approach high camp in the death scene between Jennifer Jones and Gregory Peck.An otherwise exciting movie is marred by corny dialogue in the finale..Peck and Jones fade into the sunset with a glorious musical flourish.What should have been a very dramatic moment is wasted.

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Guest Alix

Okay, this one is REALLY bad! My guilty pleasure is TRANSYLVANIA 6500, and I don't think they come any more stupid than this. It stars Ed Begley,Jr., Jeff Goldblum, Carol Kane, and a bunch of other stars who probably wish they'd never seen the script. It concerns a tabloid publisher (Norman Fell) who sends his son and a reporter to Transylvania to cover a story that Frankenstein is alive and well. There are wolfmen, fortune tellers, village idiots, hunchbacks, rotten jokes, vampires, mad doctors and a lot more. I consider this my one lapse into bad taste.

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Guest walker, ken

Alix, I guess i'm another oddball but I thought this movie was very funny.It was a spoof,not very well done from a technical standpoint,but was another one of those "so bad it's good" movies! There's no accounting for taste I guess! kw

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Guest son, jery

I can already hear hysterical laughter when I name "Valley of the Dolls." I love to watch over and over again the scene where Patty Duke is in alleyway, a bootle of "booze" in hand, on her hands and knees and she screams her name over and over:"I'm NEELIEEEEEEE! NEELIEEEEEEE O'HARAAAAAAAA!" And when she sings in an alcoholism ward and she inspires a crippled man to get up and walk (I think this is the way it works). I--I can't write anymore. I'm laughing because my name isn't NEELIEEEEEE! NEELIEEEEE O'HARA!"

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Guest mongo

One of my all time favorite guilty pleasuress is the film "Cobra Woman" (1944) with the one and only beauty Maria Montez. She plays good and evil twin sisters somewhere on an island in the pacific. Jon Hall and Sabu are there too in the company of a chimp. In lush color the film is a hoot especially the cobra dance. Good camp. Another one is called "White Pongo" (1945) about a search for a rare albino gorilla (man in gorilla suit). An actress named Maris Wrixon is in it and for about 70 minutes you'll actually laugh your butt off.

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Guest walker, ken

mongo, About the only good thing that I remember about "Cobra Woman" is the beautiful Technicolor production.I believe this is the one where Lon Chaney Jr. tosses Edgar Barrier onto a bed of spikes[scene often deleted in tv prints]. I'm not sure,but isn't the man in the gorilla suit, Ray "crash" Corrigan in "White Pongo"?

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Guest Alix

Ken, thanks! I had a feeling I'd get laughed at all across the country for this one! I agree, technically it was rotten, but I guess it was, as you say, "so bad it's good!" I loved the characters of Lupe and Radu (the servents), and I thought Dr. Malavaqua was the perfect stereotype of the mad doctor. I'm getting the itch to go dig out my video tape and watch it again.

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Guest son, jery

I adore all of Maria Montez--The Queen of Technicolor--campy extravaganzas. I only wish Jon Hall had bared more of his flesh like Tarzan. He always wore some darned vest or blouse. Sabu was a cutie-pie. There are pictures on the web somewhere that shows poor Maria's body after she scalded herself to death in a bath of salts. That's something I do not want to see!

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Guest mongo

jery son there is a treat in store for you if you watch "The Hurricane" (1937) where Jon Hall as Terangi wears nothing but a skimpy sarong in the island scenes. Along with Dorothy Lamour and Mary Astor this John Ford film is a marvel of special effects. Hall also reveals more flesh in "South of Pago Pago" (1940) with Frances Farmer. With cancer of the bladder the poor guy shot himself to death at age 66. What a shame.

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Guest Alix

Coffee Dan mentioned REEFER MADNESS. Has anyone seen this? I've seen this up for sale on ebay, but just haven't wanted to shell out the bucks for it.

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Guest walker, ken

Alix, I saw this film some years ago in a theater and recently on TV. It was a explotation type of movie in the same genre as the "notorious" "Mom and Dad".Kroger Babb produced many of these and were suppose to be limited to adults only.This was not always enforced.These two films were available on tape. Western and B film actor Dave O'Brien was the "star" of "Reefer Madness".It purported to show the evils of drug use. The scenes where O'Brien plays the piano while under the influence are pure camp as is most of the movie.Remember,it was meant to be serious!! kw

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Guest Kelleher, Eileen

Hi there Alix, I'm a long time lurker but just had to chime in on this one. I own a copy of REEFER MADNESS. I don't know how much you have seen it on Ebay for but I found it for about $5.00 at a video store "we just want to get rid of these movies" sale. Doing a quick search on Amazon shows one for $4.95 from 1938 and one for $19.95 from 1936. No clue what the difference is tho. As for the movie, it's a hoot!

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Guest Walker, Ken

Alix, Wonder of wonders!!"Reefer Madness"is on DVD!Amazon has 4 versions[DVD and tape].I might just break down and get a copy. Are any of you fans familiar with Dwayne Espars work? One of his "masterpieces" was "Maniac".He was a producer in the 30's and early 40's of schlock movies.I'd be interested to hear opinions about him or his films.

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Guest Alix

Thanks Eileen & Ken (and welcome to you, Eileen!). I've seen it for as cheap as $1.99 on Ebay (without S & H), depending on the auction. I might have to breakdown and get it myself. I've always heard it was just tooooo funny! Sorry, Ken, I don't have DVD. I'll just have to content myself with VHS. Eileen, what's your favorite genre, or you just a movie buff?

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Guest Kelleher, Eileen

Thanks for the welcome Alix! hhmm, favorite genre? None really. I like all kinds. Some of my favorites (for this GP thread) are Little Shop of Horrors (the 1960 one with Jack Nicholson), Soylent Green and then there is Metropolis from 1927. I never get tired of seeing Sergeant York or No Time for Sergeants. I love musicals too. Even the very first album that I bought was a sound track to Fiddler on the Roof. My problem is that I don't remember so good so I'm just in awe reading the posts here. I watch a movie and an hour later can't tell you who was in it or what the name was unless I have seen it a dozen times.

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Guest walker, ken

Eileen, May I join Alix in welcoming you aboard.You mentioned some good movies in your post.I've been a movie buff for many years, but I was amazed at the knowledge of the many fans that frequent these message boards.I really enjoy chatting with them.I'm looking forward to seeing your posts often.

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Guest Kelleher, Eileen

Thanks Ken! I don't know about seeing my posts "often", but I do read the boards (all of them) daily. It's been pretty cool watching them grow again after Richard pruned them.

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Guest R, Cyndi

Okay, guilty pleasures....I'm almost beyond embarrassed to admit this, but one movie that I absolutely love is "Serial Mom"!!!! I know, I know, but I can't help it...there is just something about John Waters' films... How can you not love Kathleen Turner singing Barry Manilow songs while committing some horrible murder???

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Guest Alix

SOYLENT GREEN...wow, what a movie. I very much enjoyed Edward G. Robinson's last movie role. He was so good! His death scene was well acted and moving. The first time I saw this I had no idea what the heck the movie was about...and then like Charlton Heston, I saw the big chipper and thought, "Oh no! They're eating people!" That line of Heston's "It's People!!!" is one of my favorite movie lines of all time. Loved METROPOLIS. It's hard to believe it's silent.

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Guest Kelleher, Eileen

Indeed, it's very hard to think of METROPOLIS as being silent. The first time I saw it was at a friends house and he had this amazing sound system. He had taken the movie and added a sound track of all different music. I'd never seen the movie before (or even heard of it) and thought it was new and with awesome sound. I saw it in a bin for $5.00 months later, ( that same bin that REEFER MADNESS was in), took it home, popped it into my VCR and wondered where the music went. Now everytime I hear Pat Benatar and Queen, I think of METROPOLIS. That $5.00 bin was a gold mine for me. Besides the two above I also got a quarky movie called Mad Wednesday, Slugs and It's a Wonderful Life. Soylent Green is one of my favorites. It came out in 1973 and I saw it at the drive-in. I was 12-13 and prolly too young to actually be there but that was one of the good things about drive-ins back then.

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Guest K, Sandy

Very funny, Eileen, your comment about Richard "pruning" the boards! I also love METROPOLIS. What a stunning film!

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Guest Dan, Coffee

One of my guiltiest pleasures is SATAN MET A LADY, the first remake of THE MALTESE FALCON (from 1936). This film perplexes me -- it's played for laughs, but is the humor unintentional or deliberate? I think the presence of two comedic actresses -- Marie Wilson in the Effie Perrine role, and the distaff casting of Alison Skipworth in the Caspar Gutman role(!) -- tip the scale toward deliberate humor, but I'm still not sure. At any rate, everybody hams it up in this one -- they're looking for a ram's horn instead of a black bird -- including Bette Davis in the Brigid O'Shaugnessy role, a surprising funny-mysterious performance for her. At the center of this is Warren William in the Sam Spade role, wearing the broadest brimmed fedora I've ever seen. He gags it up as much as anybody, but he seems lost in some scenes, like everybody's in on the joke except him. Which was something of a disappointment for me, because when I read the novel for the first time, I pictured Sam Spade as looking very much like Warren William. But, nevertheless, SATAN MET A LADY is a pleasantly perplexing film with eccentricity to spare.

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Guest Healas, Liz

Like a lot of things, I think a favorite guilty pleasure movie really depends on your mood. But it's hard to beat Charlton Heston movies in this category. "Naked Jungle" is my current fave. It's very interactive. You can dramatically mutter "Marabunda!" along with William Conrad (exactly like the "Frau Blucher" schtick in "Young Frankenstein"), or offer helpful comments & suggestions when Charlton Heston reveals that ... HE'S NEVER DONE IT WITH A WOMAN! My husband just doesn't get the entertainment value of this movie. He gives me a disgusted look and leaves to watch TV in another room. But I'm sure there's got to be some people out there who do similar things! (?)

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