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doctorxx

Most beautifully photographed film ( in color)

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> {quote:title=Calamity wrote:}{quote}

>

> My mom made me see Phantom of the Opera with her. I do remember the snowy scene was very beautiful. Wait, there was a snowy scene, wasn't there?

In the 2004 version of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical there was, a frequent use of snowy scenes, but not in any other version that I've seen.

 

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My vote goes to My Fair Lady (especially if we consider the restored version) but I thought the original was just beautiful, especially the flower market and the horse track scenes (even though there was mostly black and white costuming)

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Hamradio made a good point. Sometimes films that stunk still looked good. Or movies of smaller consequence. Going by that, I don't know WHO did the cinematography, but the biggest bomb of all, *Heaven's Gate ,* WAS beautifully filmed.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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I didn't particullary like the First Twilight movie, (for me it's pretty much Buffy or nothing) and I didn't see the sequels.

 

 

However, the cinematography was amazing.

 

 

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> {quote:title=MovieMadness wrote:}{quote}~I better whisper this, I think Heaven's Gate is a great movie~.

 

I'll agree with you, and add that it's biggest problem is that it was too short. They had to skip too much in the last 1/3 or so.

 

Best use of color, IMO:

 

*Dodes Kaden* Kurosawa

*Juliet of the Spirits* Fellini

*200 Motels* Frank Zappa

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{font:Times New Roman} {font}

 

{font:Times New Roman}*Leave Her to Heaven* has been mentioned several times here and I’m watching it now. The color is exquisite and you’d swear they were in real houses, the Southwest or the Maine Woods rather than the Fox set. I’d love to live in the main house for real.{font}

 

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{font:Times New Roman}*Black Narcissus *had to be vivid because of the sensuous nature of the film’s story. We were kept guessing whether the nuns were being seduced from their mission by all this sensuality playing on theirs. It all worked together.{font}

 

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{font:Times New Roman}*Robin Hood* seems to be the most famous and discussed color film in history. I tend to rate it number 1 as well. Again, you can’t find anything false in the indoor or outdoor settings. The color is not vivid but not garish. {font}

 

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{font:Times New Roman}The cinematography for all three films is clear and crisp. You think you are there rather than watching a screen. {font}

 

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{font:Times New Roman}These are only three movies out of countless color film; I’m certain a case can be made for many of them. {font}

 

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*Heaven's Gate* is too short? Funny thing to say about a Michael Cimino film, as his supposed masterpiece *The Deer Hunter* was WAYYYY too long! You could cut about 45 minutes of useless crap out of it and STILL have a good story. Good Godfrey! Hadn't he ever thought of hiring an EDITOR??

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> *Heaven's Gate* is too short? Funny thing to say about a Michael Cimino film, as his supposed masterpiece *The Deer Hunter* was WAYYYY too long! You could cut about 45 minutes of useless crap out of it and STILL have a good story. Good Godfrey! Hadn't he ever thought of hiring an EDITOR??

>

> Sepiatone

>

 

I'm not a fan of *The Deer Hunter*. *Heaven's Gate* is a way better film. I realize that it is a very long film, longer than most people like a film to be. But, I see little, if any, that I would cut. And, as I said, there are just too many gaps in the story in the last 1/4-1/3. So, it needed to be a bit longer, to fill those gaps. *HG* is a story of the times that had not really been told before, but needed to be. It was long and complicated, but very well done. I had no problem sitting through it.

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> {quote:title=wouldbestar wrote:}{quote}{font:Times New Roman} {font}

>

> {font:Times New Roman}*Leave Her to Heaven* has been mentioned several times here and I’m watching it now. The color is exquisite and you’d swear they were in real houses, the Southwest or the Maine Woods rather than the Fox set. I’d love to live in the main house for real.{font}

...

 

 

 

 

I like *Leave Her to Heaven*, but it's not a favorite. But, every showing of it I've seen, the print looked way too dark, like it was in serious need of cleaning, before a transfer was done. This includes seeing it on TCM a couple of years ago (IIRC.) So, I don't understand saying "the color is exquisite." I guess I should try to catch it the next time around, and see if they have a better transfer.

 

Edited by: ValentineXavier on Mar 11, 2012 9:03 PM

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Val,

 

Fox restored the film about two years ago. They showed the restored version at the first TCM Film Festival and it was a revelation. It is an incredibly beautiful film.

 

TCM aired that restored version either in 2010 or 2011 but it has aired and is definitely worth watching.

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*The Last of the Mohicans* with Daniel Day Lewis

 

and

 

*A River Runs Through It*.

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To name a few:

 

*Gone With the Wind*

*Far From The Madding Crowd*

*Legends of the Fall*

 

 

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{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}lz nominated *{font:}The Last of the Mohicans{font}* with Daniel Day Lewis and *{font:}A River Runs Through It{font}*. She knows what she's talking about.{font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}I saw the first one again last night and agree it belongs on this thread. I saw clips of the second and was impressed enough to want to see the whole film. {font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}Valentine, I saw Leave Her to Heaven on Fox HD. My set, a Vizio, has standard, custom, movie, vivid, game, and sports settings which alter the color configuration. I started with standard which provided jewel-like colors but caused the complexion tones, especially Cornel Wilde's, to be off so I switched to movie which muted the colors a bit but made the skin tones more lifelike. There's still plenty of color left. {font}

 

 

{font:Times New Roman} {font}{font:}{color:black}I recommend Vizio to anybody looking to buy a new set.{font}

 

 

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The Searchers, Shane, Days of Heaven and The Black Stallion. Also, although the movie itself was awful (imho), the Blue Lagoon (1980 version) had such stunning cinematography that I endured the whole movie, just to see the beautiful images.

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Valentine, I was referring to *The Deer Hunter* being too long. A very good story, true. And wonderfully shot. But did we REALLY need to see the entire wedding reception? And wouldn't that worn-out gag of driving off on the guy just as he reaches the car work better if they didn't drive off so far, and did it only TWICE? After the fourth time, it got REALLY stale! And that's only TWO examples. I believe a rule of thumb in movie making is:

 

 

Pacing! Pacing! Pacing!!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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David and Bathsheba, The Quiet Man and Mutiny on the Bounty 1962...

 

Jake in the Heartland

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My first choice would be: LADY IN THE DARK . . . And, I think 1944 was a banner year for Color with such titles as:

 

THE PRINCESS AND THE PIRATE

 

NATIONAL VELVET

 

HOME IN INDIANA

 

COVER GIRL

 

THE THREE CABALLEROS

 

ALI BABA AND THE FORTY THIEVES

 

KISMET

 

CAN'T HELP SINGING

 

And the biggest Color hit of all that year:

 

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS

 

 

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This thread has morphed away from the original proposition of "color and composition," to one simply listing films with good color (The Adventures of Robin Hood still being the best). But for the original intent you have to consider how the director used color along with other techniques to achieve her or his goals.

 

In Funny Face, color and the absence of color are alternated and played with to comment on and support the developments in the story. Audrey Hepburn is left in the disordered book shop, where everything is dull browns. A hat left behind is the only spot of bright color, representing, along with the disshleved books, the intrusion of the Avedon world, and the upheavals in store. It also shows Audrey's attraction for what the hat represents.

 

The photo shoot documents not only the process of putting together a fashion layout, and Audrey's growing competence as a model, but also her growing love for Fred Astaire, and his realization of it at the end. The simultaneous color separations ironically cast it as a magazine pictorial and also make us aware of the artificiality both within the plot and the process of moviemaking itself. It is one of the most brilliantly photographed sequences in film by one of the most competent color directors, Stanley Donnen.

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