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AndyM108

STORM WARNING (1950) - KLAN KO'd BY GIPPER & GINGER

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LOL. I doubt that was due to Doris. Most 50s films are like that........

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Yeah, I figured there must've been a splice there. There were several jumps during the movie as if the film had been spliced together..........

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Fred, Earnie Kovacks had a black manservant in *It Happened To Jane* .

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Morgan Freeman and James McEachin had uncredited bits in WHERE WERE YOU WHEN THE LIGHTS WENT OUT?

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Morgan Freeman was in that? LOL. I havent seen that film in decades...........

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While they are indeed in the film, I was being somewhat sarcastic. I figured if there wasn't a black person in a movie set in mid-60s NYC, then there is something wrong.

 

I haven't seen it since it came out. A date wanted to go to Radio City Music Hall and that was the film that was playing there in the summer of 1968.

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LOL. I think the last time I saw it was on it's network run many years ago. I dont think TCM has ever shown it.......Why should Doris be taken to task for Hollywood's racism? One could single out anyone from that era. What about Debbie Reynolds? LOL........

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Certainly it's less the fault of the star than it is of the Hollywood perception of what middle-America wanted to see.

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I'm not taking Doris to task. It was the film makers who did this.

 

They put black actors in movies based in the South, and usually all-white actors in movies based in the North.

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It's possible she didn't notice, but how could she not notice?

 

It's interesting that when a housekeeper is called for in her comedies, they do not even get a black actress for that...they call up Thelma Ritter and give her the job!

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}I'm not blaming Doris at all. She probably didn't even notice.

 

I never thought that you were. As far as there not being any Blacks shown in STORM WARNING, I look at it this way - if I were Black, I would not be living in such a town. With most of the population apparently involved or in approval of the ****, the "boundaries" would have been loud and clear.

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musicalnovelty, that's how I remember it. They must have trusted the

guy's aim since they weren't that far away.

 

I chalk some of these things up to the old Hollywood hokum. I too was

surprised to see Ronnie arrive in one car (with siren on) with only one or

two other people with him in this crowd of hundreds of not too happy

Klansmen. The way he greets everybody shows, with other scenes, that

local law enforcement likely knew who was in the Klan, or were even

members themselves. I was thinking of a good trick ending where the head

Klansman has his hood on and when he takes it off, it's Reagan. The same

with Ginger's whipping. She sure didn't seem to be very hurt after all she

went through.

 

Weren't there a few black actors in some of the crowd scenes? Certainly not

as many as you might expect to see in your average southern town of the time.

And it looks like the place where Doris works is a whites only establishment.

 

 

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>Weren't there a few black actors in some of the crowd scenes?

 

Yes, I counted about 5 or 6 in the big crowd of 200 to 300 people at the Court House during the open hearing.

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Seems to me that the Reagan character in this Warner Brothers film was modeled after the Joel McCrea character in "Stars in my Crown", which was released by MGM about 8 or 9 months earlier. McCrea confronts the Klansmen in the same way, calling them out by name.

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I think Ginger could have saved herself a beating and a dead sister if she just kept her trap shut when threatening to expose a known killer to his face. But then again the script called for it.

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Yes, that scene is the unrealistic plot moment for this film. Ginger wasn't a complete dummy and thus she had to know it wasn't wise to tell her bro-in-law that she was going to spill the beans. All she had to do was say she was leaving town. Instead she tells him she is going to expose him as well as the ****. The topper was that then she says she isn't afraid of him. Even someone with an IQ of 70 would of be afraid for their safety after mouthing off like she did.

 

The script writer just got lazy and uncreative.

 

 

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They put black actors in movies based in the South, and usually all-white actors in movies based in the North.

 

Though Warner Brothers in the 30's often had at least one or two black prisoners in their jail movies (e.g. Ladies They Talk About ), and sometimes ( The Petrified Forest ) they even had a black man in a criminal gang. And then of course there was the Our Gang comedies.

 

But as far as casting a black actor in a non-stereotyped role, that would have to wait till actors like Juano Hernandez and Sidney Poitier began to break the mold. The Lucas Beauchamp character that Hernandez portrayed in Intruder in the Dust may have been the first black person in any Hollywood semi-leading role who wasn't either a servant or a buffoon. Fredi Washington's role in Imitation of Life was memorable, but even that was but one more version of the "tragic Negro" stock character.

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As far as there not being any Blacks shown in STORM WARNING, I look at it this way - if I were Black, I would not be living in such a town. With most of the population apparently involved or in approval of the ****, the "boundaries" would have been loud and clear.

 

That's logical in theory, but in the real world of the Jim Crow South, the Klan was usually most active in places where the whites were either a minority or a small majority. What shows Hollywood's true colors is that every mainstream movie prior to Intruder in the Dust that centered around a lynching always had a white person as the victim, which is a completely false portrayal of reality.

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I haven't seen this movie since Reagan was in the White House!

 

The print seems to have deteriorated rapidly since that time. I, too, thought the Reagan role was written rather superficially, but he did the best he could with it. He was never the best actor in the bunch; I'd describe him as adequate.

 

Ginger Rogers was a very attractive woman, even in her later years, but while she looked good, she was clearly in her late 30s and too old to be a model, especially a lingerie model (didn't Steve Cochran taunt her about undressing in front of men?). Can you imagine her next to a 23-year-old wearing a skimpy bra or a sexy nightgown? Did they even advertise bras on live models in those days?

 

Doris Day was a pretty good dramatic actress. I especially loved her in The Man Who Knew Too Much.

 

I thought Steve Cochran played his role as a dumb **** (oops, that's probably redundant) pretty well. I do think the scriptwriter was trying to make a point.

 

I agree with the posters who said that the script tended to go off into the silly, with some of those flip remarks Reagan had to give, as well as Rogers taunting Cochran with exposure, which was a dumb thing to do.

 

It's nice when they show these rarely seen films.

 

BLU

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I'm always amused at how often people in the movies tell the

bad guy they're going to the police. How dumb can you be.

Yet they keep on doing it. I guess the characters in movies

never go to movies.

 

 

I thought there were a few blacks in the crowd. The Klan

operated in a lot of towns, so maybe moving wouldn't have

made much difference. People were also bonded to the area

they lived in and it was probably harder just to uproot from

that place, though quite a few blacks did move north after

WW II.

 

 

If this was still the unfortunate situation today, maybe there

would be an app highlighting which areas were Klan controlled.

 

 

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>The Lucas Beauchamp character that Hernandez portrayed in Intruder in the Dust may have been the first black person in any Hollywood semi-leading role who wasn't either a servant or a buffoon.

 

Yes, he was very good in that film. A poor but intelligent man. Certainly not a servant. White audiences were not used to seeing black men playing these types of roles.

 

An even earlier film with a mature educated black person in it was In This Our Life, with Bette Davis and Ernest Anderson playing a mature young black law student. Hattie McDaniel was his mother and she played a very good serious dramatic role in this film. She would have been a very good dramatic actress.

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