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AndyM108

STORM WARNING (1950) - KLAN KO'd BY GIPPER & GINGER

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Did anyone catch this sleeper? I tuned into it after reading the brief synopsis and wondering how on Earth they'd ever cast Reagan as a Klansman, only to discover that an entire Kornfield Krowded with Kluxers was no match for the Gipper and the Hoofer. I have to admit I thoroughly enjoyed it in spite of the sheer impossibility of the Reagan role and the general implausibility of the entire plot. But taken as sheer drama, it was a winner, even if poor Doris bit the dust in the end. I only wish that Day had been in more straight dramas and fewer comedies and musicals. The one before Storm Warning ( Midnight Lace ) wasn't too bad, either.

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I saw that it flashed by rather quickly, but the print was rather choppy looking anyway. I'm not sure if it was owing to bad reception or the print itself. Nothing else tonight has been similarly affected though so most likely it was the print.

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This is a film that's been in need of restoration. Strangely, considering the cast and the subject matter, one would think there would be historical interest to preserve this movie. When first released, the movie obviously didn't have much of a run in parts of the South and local theaters weren't exactly thrilled with the whole idea, since this wasn't an easy film to promote. Today, the movie does have a cult following of sorts and has been regularly shown at a few film festivals. This film was in a heroic sense to Ron Reagan one of his favorites and was a subject for awhile at least, during his bid for the Presidency.

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> {quote:title=cody1949 wrote:}{quote}Did anyone notice that Ginger Rogers name was not in the opening credits. I wonder why?

Yes, it was weird. Some kind of glitch or something I 'spose, I doubt it was intentional. I'm not an expert at prints, but it did seem like the one they used was a little dusty- there were scenes where it was soooo dark it was like film ultra noir- but y'know, that kind of made it work better.

 

I have been working really hard lately and *sadly* I fell asleep about 30 minutes into this, I woke up near the ending where *GINGER ROGERS WAS TIED TO A POST AND BEING WHIPPED BY THE KLAN.*

 

Holy s***, I have never regretted falling asleep so much in all my life.

 

*PLEASE RE-RUN THIS THING AGAIN, TCM, PREFERABLY BEFORE 10:00 PM FOR THOSE OF US WITHOUT DVR.*

 

Thanks much.

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Unfortunately Doris Day's husband Marty Melcher tended to disregard some of the more dramatic scripts that were sent, often not even telling his wife about them.

 

While she could play musicals and comedies with the best of them, when given a good script and competent director, she was very believable in more dramatic roles. The dramatic scenes in "Love Me or Leave Me" are amazing. Likewise, there are scenes in "The Man Who Knew Too Much", including the scene where James Stewart sedates her before telling her about their son, in which she is raw and realistic and it is almost painful to watch.

 

William Wyler originally wanted to cast Miss Day and Katharine Hepburn in "The Children's Hour" and if you put aside the memories of Miss Day's comedies and solely focus on her more dramatic performances, it probably would have been very memorable under a director like Wyler.

 

Likewise, George Cukor and Arthur Laurents wanted to work with Miss Day in the 1960's but Melcher turned them down in favor of doing "Caprice" and "The Ballad of Josie".

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Glad I was finally able to see this (have wanted to for years) Print was not in good shape and I too noticed Ginger Rogers name deleted somehow (splice?). There were several other scenes that had jumps. Pretty good movie overall, though I I was disappointed in Steve Cochran's performance. I was expecting him to be a nasty character (like others he's played) but he just played it stupid. Not much of a role for Doris, and definitely the most atypical of all her films!

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LOL. What a scene to wake up to!! Dont think Ginger ever had it so bad in any of her films like this! I was chuckling during parts wondering how Joan Crawford would've handled the role (she turned it down telling Jack Warner, no one would believe Doris Day was her sister! LOL) Was a bit of a stretch with Ginger too, with the age difference, but at least they were both blondes......

 

Yes, very dark. Although much of the movie took place in the dark, the print seemed much darker than it was supposed to be.......

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Not a stretch for me Hibi. I had two cousins, brother and sister. The brother (now deceased) was a year younger than my Mother, and the sister(also deceased) was a year older than ME!

 

 

And am I the only one who wonders if Jay Leno is Steve Cocharan's love child?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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This film is one of my favorites. It has great parts for actors looking for dramatic challenges. Ginger Rogers did a wonderful job. She did not play her part overwrought. She was just right.

 

She was surrounded by a great cast of Warners' character actors. It was funny to see the Imperial Wizard of Storm Warning Charlie Barr (Hugh Sanders) playing a good guy in the next movie "The Winning Team" again opposite Reagan.

 

The whipping scene always reminds me of Bonita Granville's whipping in Hitler's Children.

 

I love how the burning cross breaks off and falls in the end. So much for the ****'s theatrics!

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JonnyGeetar, this movie is available on DVD, if you want to watch it again.

I remember for the longest time there were no copies available either on DVD or on VHS. It was very frustrating. Glad it got released on DVD eventually.

Although, I like watching a movie when it's "live" on TCM, rather than watching it on DVD. Makes it more exciting, for some reason. Like I am part of something big that is happening now, with millions of people.

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*I was chuckling during parts wondering how Joan Crawford would've handled the role (she turned it down telling Jack Warner, no one would believe Doris Day was her sister! LOL)*

 

Ginger Rogers did a great job. However, she wasn't all that believable as a model; when Cochran told her how pretty she was, she seemed anything but to me. Much better and more believable if Lauren Bacall had done it; shge too turned it down. Crawford would've been way too old IMHO. Yes, it was not a typical role for Steve but I thought he did a good job in a milti-faceted role.

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It stared out looking like a noir and then slowly turned into a

rather average melodrama. The one redeeming feature was

the setting and Klan subject matter. This is one pic where I

figured Steve would not be dressed in a pinstripe suit, which

he so often seemed to be. Uncle Bob may have been right that

there is a superficial resemblance to Streetcar, but the Ginger

Roger's character is no Blanche Dubois. It was a somewhat

interesting curio, but not something that I'd like to see again

and again.

 

I thought Ginger was being held by two Klansmen while she was

being whipped, not tied to a post.

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I would've had a hard time buying Crawford standing still for that whipping! LOL.

 

There was nothing wrong with Steve's acting. I just thought he should've played the role heavier rather than a dumb lummox type........

 

Edited by: Hibi on Apr 5, 2012 3:01 PM

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Yes. I could see the movie being a tough sell in certain parts of the country. Kind of like some of WB's 30's melodramas but with a bit more bite. Interesting that they didnt make the victim in the beginning a black man. Maybe that was just a bit too much for the 50s. Of course finding a local prosecutor like Ronnie in the south willing or interested in taking on the Klan was a hard sell too........

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*Kind of like some of WB's 30's melodramas but with a bit more bite. Interesting that they didnt make the victim in the beginning a black man. Maybe that was just a bit too much for the 50s. Of course finding a local prosecutor like Ronnie in the south willing or interested in taking on the Klan was a hard sell too........*

 

It was part of the wave of films at the end of the 40s-beginning of the 50s that were racially related. Think PINKY, LOST BOUNDARIES, INTRUDER IN THE DUST, NO WAY OUT. Only seems that WB chickened out and did't go all the way with the identity of the victim, but they weren't alone in that type of hedging; think PINKY, GENTLEMENS' AGREEMENT.

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I paused my recorded DVD at the opening of this film and then slow forwarded it and Ginger Rogers' name does blip in the first opening credit, very hard to see at normal speed. The film did have several instances of choppy scenes and I hope a better copy is available and the movie is shown again soon.

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>Interesting that they didnt make the victim in the beginning a black man.

 

For some reason, black people are exceedingly rare in Doris Day films. In most of her films, there aren't any at all. Even in New York street scenes.

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Ginger could have modeled for me anyday. ;) I thought it was a great movie, and it was chopped up when Ginger was getting manhandled by hubby, almost like it was censored.

 

Reagan also came across pretty good in this movie, lucky for him he didn't play the head of the clan.

 

 

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> {quote:title=C.Bogle wrote:}{quote}

>

> I thought Ginger was being held by two Klansmen while she was

> being whipped, not tied to a post.

That is correct. At least, that's how it looked to me.

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> {quote:title=C.Bogle wrote:}{quote}

>

> I thought Ginger was being held by two Klansmen while she was

> being whipped, not tied to a post.

> That is correct. At least, that's how it looked to me.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> I counted 4 or 5 whippings, all but the first one to her *face *. Kind of made me wonder why her face didn't look like a bloody pulp at the end of her ordeal. A sustained whipping like that should have left her disfigured for life.

>

I also love the way that the Reagan character walks into this enormous Klan rally and greets the hooded nightriders with casual remarks like *"Hi, Joe, how's business?"*, as if he had nothing to fear from them, in spite of the fact that he'd repeatedly announced his intention to arrest the murderer of the news reporter and drive the organization out of business. The contrast between the Klansmen's violence and the way they treated their main nemesis (Reagan) with kid gloves was one of the many features that gave this film an almost surreal quality. It was great entertainment, but about the best you can say about its depiction of reality is that it wasn't as bad as Mississippi Burning . ;)

 

EDIT: I wrote that last italicized paragraph, not C. Bogle

 

Edited by: AndyM108 on Apr 6, 2012 9:45 AM

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Yeah, it was more Hollywood reality. In the real world, Ronnie would've been lucky to get out of there alive! LOL.

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