Sign in to follow this  
TopBilled

Classic Character Actors

853 posts in this topic

>Don't think anyone's mentioned my favorite: WARD BOND.

 

I have a good one planned for Ward Bond. Check back later this week.

 

Today, I am going to feature Dudley Digges...I found the perfect movie quote spoken by him...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

digges-dudley-1.png

*Dudley Digges*

 

To Ian Wolfe in THE SEARCHING WIND:

 

I _hate_ the opera. There's something insane about people opening their mouths very wide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I like Dudley Digges very much. One of my favorite Digges roles is as the Nilgai in The Light that Failed. He's part of this hilarious exchange with Walter Huston, talking about Ronald Colman.

 

Digges: "Women and dogs, they can't resist him. He stole one away from me once in Cairo. I haven't forgiven him yet."

 

Huston: "A woman or a dog?"

 

Digges: "Oh, it was a long time ago, I don't remember."

 

 

Digges did a tremendous amount of theater, including serious plays and classics. He created the role of Harry Hope in The Iceman Cometh.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think I mentioned Richard Gaines initially. I'll also add Ward Bond. Swear to God that man was prolific. Seemed to be in 80% of the movies made in the 30's and 40's. Credited, uncredited. Sometimes I think he just showed up and walked on set and joined in :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information about Dudley Digges. I just looked him up to learn more. He was born in Dublin. He appeared in 40 Hollywood productions starting in 1929, and he seems to have worked at all the major studios. One of his first notable Hollywood roles was as a villain in the Ricardo Cortez version of MALTESE FALCON. He died in New York in 1947. His last film credit is for THE SEARCHING WIND in '46.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right about how prolific Ward Bond was in films. Not even counting over 100 episodes for television's Wagon Train, he has at least 227 film credits according to the TCM database. As you said a fair number are uncredited parts from early in his career, but he certainly worked a lot.

 

I am going to profile him tomorrow. I am trying to alternate between the men and the women. I already had Dudley Digges' piece prepared for yesterday, and later today I am going to post Maria Ouspenskaya. Check back for Ward Bond.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maria-ouspenskaya-300x168.jpg

*Maria Ouspenskaya*

 

To Lon Chaney Jr. in THE WOLF MAN:

 

Whoever is bitten by a werewolf and lives, becomes a werewolf himself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1ward.jpg

*Ward Bond*

 

To Richard Greene in LITTLE OLD NEW YORK:

 

Why, you dribblin' young pup--I'll break you in two!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite Robert W. Wilke. He was the best of the very Bad Men.He was in hundreds of movies and television shows starting in the forties. There is a picture with his bio and credits on the IMDB. You will recognize him right away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=2847 wrote:}{quote}My favorite Robert W. Wilke. He was the best of the very Bad Men.He was in hundreds of movies and television shows starting in the forties. There is a picture with his bio and credits on the IMDB. You will recognize him right away.

Not always. I spent nearly all of *Hallelujah Trail* trying to figure out who Chief Five Barrels was. When it finally hit me I couldn't believe it at first. I think it's still the only time when I've seen him not end up "getting his" at the hands of the hero. Like so many other career villains he was hilarious in a comedy role when given the chance. If you've not seen it, you'll love it.

 

Oh, yes, if you like Martin Landau, he'll almost make you forget *North By Northwest;* as the chief's blue-eyed partner of dubious parentage he'll have you laughing til you hurt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Through the late 50s and early 60s, Wilke must have been on at least one TV western each week. He was great at evil.

 

I believe that James Garner said he was also the best golfer in Hollywood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Re Ward Bond here, TB...

 

 

I think my favorite line or lines of his are in John Ford's "Wagon Master", and that one particular scene where he as Elder Wiggs, Ben Johnson as Travis Blue, and Harry Carey Jr. as Sandy have the following exchange with a Navajo indian....

 

 

[Travis Blue|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0424565/]: [of the indians] Near as I can figure out, he don't seem to like white men.

*[sandy|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001013/]*: Yeah, he say's we're all thieves.

*[Elder Wiggs|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000955/]*: Smarter then he looks!

[Sandy speaks Navajo, evidently translating what Elder Wiggs had just said]

*[Elder Wiggs|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000955/]*: Don't tell him that, you fool! Tell him we're Mormans!

[the Navajos speak in their native touge, mutterring "Mormany" repeatedly]

*[Elder Wiggs|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000955/]*: What'd he say?

*[sandy|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001013/]*: Say's the Mormans are his brothers. Say's they ain't big thieves like most white men. Just little thieves.

*[Elder Wiggs|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000955/]*: Right complementery, ain't he?

 

 

That one particular line above where he sort of confirms the thought expressed by the indian about white men, "Smarter than he looks", always cracks me up big time.

 

 

Of hand, I'd say that this role of Bond's might've been his biggest and best of his long career, wouldn't ya say?!

 

 

(...btw, one addition note here...When I copied and pasted the above dialogue, I noticed something that I didn't know before, and that is that the great American athlete, Jim Thorpe has a role in this film...so, do you know if that was him in this scene?)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about Thorpe's participation in WAGON MASTER. As for Bond, it's a given that his role in this picture led to Universal casting him for TV's Wagon Train.

 

Ward Bond had a lead role in GYPSY COLT, which airs occasionally on TCM. It's a reworking of LASSIE, with the story of the beloved canine transposed to an equestrian tale. Donna Corcoran is the little girl, playing the daughter of Bond, and her mother is played by Frances Dee (Mrs. Joel McCrea) in what would be Dee's last screen role.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

images-35.jpg

*Fay Holden*

 

To Lewis Stone in JUDGE HARDY'S CHILDREN:

 

Nobody ever paid anybody $200 a day for anything honest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

images-213.jpg

*Walter Brennan*

 

To Jack Lambert in BRIMSTONE:

 

A man that ain't no good at gun slingin' ain't no good for me-- even if he is my son.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thomas Mitchell probably appeared in more truly film classics than any other character actor. He won his supporting Oscar in 1939 for "Stagecoach" but it could have been for so many other films he made in 1939.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very true, twtpark. One might even say in just 1939 alone, he was..ahem.."tailor-made" to play his roles in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" ( ;) get it? "Taylor-made"...one of his notable lines in that one), and in Gone with the Wind".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

stagedoor.jpg

*Constance Collier*

 

To Katharine Hepburn in STAGE DOOR:

 

You're an actress now. You belong to these people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2288.jpg

*George Macready*

 

To Glenn Ford in GILDA, regarding his knife-concealing cane:

 

It is silent when I wish it to be silent. It talks when I wish it to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an excellent picture of Ward Bond. Hard to choose a favorite film role of his because he was in so many films. But my favorite Ward Bond moment is in MISTER ROBERTS when William Powell gives him Henry Fonda's last letter to post for the crew, and before he takes the letter, Ward Bond removes his work glove. Just remembering that makes me a little misty. Excellent touch.

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}1ward.jpg

> *Ward Bond*

>

> To Richard Greene in LITTLE OLD NEW YORK:

>

> Why, you dribblin' young pup--I'll break you in two!

Now my favorite character actress is another John Ford favorite, Mildred Natwick. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to find a photo of Ward Bond in his youth, and this was the best one I could locate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

images-133.jpg

*Jane Darwell*

 

To Don Ameche and Loretta Young in RAMONA:

 

As far as I'm concerned, a Christian's a Christian, no matter what the color of his skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

57010.gif

*Chris-Pin Martin*

 

To Randolph Scott in FRONTIER MARSHAL:

 

Doc, he drink whiskey like crazy man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

images37.jpg

*Beulah Bondi*

 

To Ralph Remley in READY FOR LOVE:

 

Chester, stay away from that cider. Remember the strawberry festival when you were flirting about telling everyone you were a butterfly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I love Beulah Bondi most in REMEMBER THE NIGHT-- her relationships in that are so real, especially between her and her sister (played by another great character actress Elizabeth Patterson). Also love how she milks her heart conditiion in VIVACIOUS LADY.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us