EugeniaH

Favorite film soundtracks or film songs

393 posts in this topic

It's an omen... the TCM Message Boards are introducing modern songs/groups. We are becoming less classic!

 

(that's just a joke, folks....)

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}Is the Bangles' (I believe) "Walk Like an Egyptian" from THE EGYPTIAN?

No, it's from *The Mummy's Curse* with Lon Chaney Jr. :^0

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Thank you for that clip, Eugenia! :)

 

I was taken to see The Egyptian when I was a very small boy. Too small to understand it. Forgetting the film, some years later, as a young teen, I dreamed about a man who had a patch over one eye. He removed that patch and plucked a jewel out of the socket. He used the jewel to buy passage on a ship for himself and a small boy. It wasn't until I saw The Egyptian again that I realized the scene was from that film, the man being Peter Ustinov.

 

 

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When I go see a jazz show at a small club I'll ask them to Play Two Marvelous For Words. It has become my wife's and my song as well, all because of that Dark Passage connection.

 

The song isn't that popular with jazz singers but a few jazz guitar players have covered the song. One of my favorite for sure.

 

Kern, who wrote Long Ago and Far Away is one of my favorite composers. It is very enjoyable to play his music since his harmonies are just complex enough but 'sweet' sounding at the same time. Right up there with Cole Porter.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Jun 30, 2012 4:32 PM

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Like Miss W., I like Nino Rota's scores, especially for Fellini films. I like the score for *A Clock-Work Orange*. I love Bert Bacharach's score for the 1967 *Casino Royale*. Another favorite is Alan Price, of The Animals, singing his song O, Lucky Man, all the way through the Lindsay Anderson/ Malcolm McDowell film of the same name.

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Eugenia, thanks for putting together that music for us. Great job! Maybe this will introduce this wonderful score to those who have never heard this. You are wonderful!

 

 

 

 

 

Terrence.

 

 

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That's sweet of you to say, Terrence, but it was only that I found the complete score on YouTube, and pasted the link here. I didn't put it together. It was just that your and Swithin's enthusiasm for the movie got me curious. :)

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ValentineXavier wrote:

<< I love Bert Bacharach's score for the 1967 Casino Royale >>

 

"The Look of Love" is one of his greatest hits! :)

I have his Greatest Hits LP on A&M Records.

 

If you are also a fan of Hal David, get this, I had it since 1972.

 

http://www.discogs.com/Various-Great-Songs-Of-Bacharach-David/release/1670181

 

The 8 track version is not listed 8XL-6764

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My favorite soundtrack is from the film Vertigo. Bernard Herrmann is my favorite composer; most of his work has such a haunting quality to it, and it really sets the tone for the film. The other soundtrack is a very close second; it comes from the movie Ghost Story, and the composer's name is Philipe Sarde. The score really is an incredible piece of work.

 

My favorite song from a film is the classic Liebestraum, from the movie of the same name. IMHO, it is the single most beautiful piece of music that I have ever heard. My choices may seem a little strange to some; I am not a morbid or depressed person by any means. I am just a person who dances to the beat of her own drum...............

 

Edited by: Geminigirl on Jul 2, 2012 2:12 PM

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IMHO, "The Look of Love" is THE best Bacharach -David song. Incidentally, Burt's father, a fashion columnist, spelled his name "Bert".

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 2, 2012 4:47 PM

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His score from "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir", and his pieces from "The Twilight Zone" really move me, too. And not to forget "Cape Fear" ......................

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I also actually enjoy Herrmann's CITIZEN KANE score (another early album I bought abck in the 70's).

There's a really good mixed bag of different types of themes in there.

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I bought a copy of it too, back in the 70s. There was a little record store in Westwood, near UCLA, that sold rare sound track records. I also bought a copy of the King Kong music. It was just the music, no dialogue.

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The two particular albums I'm thinking of (Kane and Kong) were on the United Artists label and conducted by LeRoy Holmes. Herrmann was apparently upset or perturbed (I have an interview from a magazine where he mentions this) over the Kane recording, saying something like "This guy LeRoy Holmes never asked me to do it".

 

citizenkaneuala372g.jpg

 

kingkongla373g.jpg

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Interesting. Thanks.

 

I thought it was very odd that a soundtrack album was available, since almost no one had ever heard of Citizen Kane in the mid-1970s. I saw it in an old theater in New York around 1965. An older person who saw it originally in a theater in the early 1940s told me about it, and I was lucky enough to see it when I was in New York for a few months.

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The Kong album is the first time I ever noticed the name Max Steiner. I thought the music was brilliant, and I could "see" images of the film as I listened to each segment. For example, the music for the elevated train in New York, the one Kong wrecked, sounded just like what an elevated train music should sound like. Steiner was a genius.

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> {quote:title=EugeniaH wrote:}{quote}Here's some King Kong music by Steiner:

>

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB0KeJyS9xs

>

That particular CD release of the Kong music, incidentally, contains several tracks which are the ACTUAL recordings used in the film, made in 1933, and Steiner had several 78rpm records made for a few select friends. Miraculously, some of those survived, and is the only AUTHENTIC version of the music. Personally, those are the types of vintage soundtracks I enjoy...the actual recordings used in the films themselves. I'll always take those over any modern re-recordings anytime.

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One of my oldest soundtrack recordings is the *original* release of "Snow White and the Seven Drawfs". About 8 years ago, I took a chance on Ebay and got the 3 disc set (78rpm) along with a book/sleeve combo. This is documented as the first original soundtrack made during a movie's first release.

 

All the disc are in new like condition, what I can tell was never been played. The book storage took much of the abuse but did its job perfectly in protecting them. The 78's are in better condition than the seller posted. I only use a 70's era BSR turntable to play 78's which puts virtually no wear on them.

 

78s1.jpg

 

There are 3 of these yellow lable 78's

snowwhite.jpg

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