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FredCDobbs

Little Women.... wonderful

34 posts in this topic

I'm so amazed that this story is about 150 years old, published in 1868, and made into movies in 1933 and later in the 1940s, and it is so good and so realistic, and such a good story about a wonderful family,

here we are watching it and loving it in the 21 Century. Just amazing.

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I agree with you Fred. I particularly think the 1933 version is wonderful, the later versions ok. I see Little Women as a sort of Yankee Gone with the Wind, but a much better movie than GWTW.

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I can't think of very many that show family life in the North during the War. There is Raintree County, but I can't think of any more. There must have been several that I've forgotten about.

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I guess the South was more colorful. Also I guess there weren't that many actual battles on Northern territory, so you couldn't have the dramatic counterpoint of families going about their business and battles raging outside their door.

 

Many years ago, I visited the State House in Oklahoma City, which includes a museum. There are two rooms commemorating the Civil War. One, sponsored by the North, was all muted colors; the one sponsored by the South was all red and gold. As a Yankee, I thought to myself (smugly), "how refined we are," and "what good taste we have." I see that in the difference between Little Women and GWTW. Edna May Oliver as Aunt March may be exasperating, but I'd take her anyday over Aunt Pittypat!

 

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One time, in the 1960s, I was up from the South, doing some work in rural Ohio, and I was staying in a little town for a couple of weeks. One Sunday I went down to the little central town square to look at an old monument. I read a plaque that said the monument was dedicated to "The War of the Rebellion".

 

At first I didn't understand what it meant. Finally I figured that was just an odd Ohio term for the American Revolution. :)

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Swithin, I think your second offering in this thread pretty much explains why you might feel Little Women is a "better" film than GWTW

 

Yep, it IS hard to compare two different styles of film, the former being a small intimate drama about the "home front" in a long distant war, and the later being in the "large canvas" format with at least some action being performed within the piece.

 

(...btw, Friendly Persuasion might be another film which could be somewhat comparable to the plot about the northern states home front, though of course there is some "action" in this one in the later half of this film)

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Actually, Dargo, apart from the comparison with Little Women, and despite my love for classic (and particularly big 30s) films, I've never liked GWTW much. I didn't realize why until many years ago, when I learned it had had several directors. That may be it. GWTW doesn't work as a "whole" to me, it lacks a unity. It has some scenes that I like, and some performances, but I've always felt that there is something missing.

 

Another 1939 "historic" film that I like better than GWTW but where I also feel the parts are greater than the whole is Juarez, an underrated film that has segments which are as beautiful, moving, and dramatic as any film. But it lacks a unity, which in this case has been attributed to Paul Muni's wife getting the great Mr. Muni to demand more screen time, thus screwing with the flow of the film. Bette Davis has some of her greatest scenes in Juarez; and Brian Aherne gives his best performance.

 

 

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Yeah, I think I know what ya mean about GWTW. It's as if the first half of the film goes from being a wide sweeping epic to the second half which seems little more than an episodic melodrama.

 

And re Juarez, it's been a few years since I've watched it, but I remember liking it quite a bit, even though I also remember Muni's extremely mannered portrayal of Juarez didn't bring his character to life...at least for me, anyway.

 

(...and yeah, I also remember Davis and Aherne being the best thing about it)

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>It's as if the first half of the film goes from being a wide sweeping epic to the second half which seems little more than an episodic melodrama.

 

I think Selznick intended the film to be that way. That's why the intermission is where it is. It's like the way many of our lives are more active and sometimes sweeping epics while we are young, and then after we get married and become a little older and more settled down, our lives become more sedate and more like episodic melodramas, with late-night drinking, divorces, deaths in the family, etc.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}I can't think of very many that show family life in the North during the War. There is Raintree County, but I can't think of any more. There must have been several that I've forgotten about.

How about the tv mini-series *The Blue and The Gray (1982)* ? Or the theatrical movie *Gettysburg (1993)* ?

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:

>

> }{quote}... with late-night drinking, divorces, deaths in the family, etc.

That sounds more exciting than the Civil War!

 

Actually, The Deer Hunter did three acts pretty well: the wedding; the war; back home.

 

 

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Ahem, no further discussion but a quick point of correction.

 

*That sounds more exciting than the Civil War!*

 

The War of Northern *Aggression*

 

Jake in the Heartland

 

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I guess I agree with you. Us Yankee aggressors have a nasty way of invading third world countries, we just can't resist! I'm actually beginning to think that an amicable separation would have been a good thing.

 

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*I guess I agree with you. Us Yankee aggressors have a nasty way of invading third world countries, we just can't resist! I'm actually beginning to think that an amicable separation would have been a good thing.*

 

I could not have said it better myself. I could go further but would be banned from posting. But so true...

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Now WAIT a sec here, Swithin. There's somethin' I'm not quite following here about your inference that the South is a "Third World Country"???!!!

 

Ya see, to MY way of thinkin', there's NO WAY the South could be that!

 

(...uh huh, 'cause I don't know of anywhere ELSE in the whole wide WORLD where the obesity rates in a "Third World Country" even come CLOSE to what they are In Mississippi and Alabama, dude!!!)

 

ROFL

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Oh, and btw Jake, and NOT to open up THIS whole can o' worms around here again, but IF you're still in the vicinity, maybe you've gotten the following historical FACT which anyone with access to the Internet resource known as Wikipedia can find:

 

"On Friday, April 12, 1861, at 4:30 a.m., Confederate batteries opened fire, firing for 34 straight hours, on the fort. Edmund Ruffin, noted Virginian agronomist and secessionist, claimed that he fired the first shot on Fort Sumter."

 

Sooooooo, I hesitate to ask the following of you here Jake(like I said, IF you're still around), but.....WHO were the "aggressors" again, dude???

 

(...yeah, yeah, I know..."the Rebs were FORCED to start that whole ball o' wax 'cause those damn ol' Yankees wouldn't let Southerners OWN people", huh!...yep, I "understand"...uh huh...suuuuuuuuure..."States Rights" and all, ya know!!!)

 

ROFL

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FredCDobbs wrote: I think Selznick intended the film to be that way. That's why the intermission is where it is. It's like the way many of our lives are more active and sometimes sweeping epics while we are young, and then after we get married and become a little older and more settled down, our lives become more sedate and more like episodic melodramas, with late-night drinking, divorces, deaths in the family, etc.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Hmmmm...gotta say Fred, I've never really thought about this particular "theory" as to what might explain the noticable differences in pace between the two halves of GWTW, but I suppose yours here is probably as good as anyone elses.

 

(...yep, I'll have to ruminate on this one a bit)

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I think that's a great name. The War of Northern Aggression

Against the Southern Slaveowners (aka little women). Sweet.

 

 

 

 

 

18%20JUL%20General%20Sherman%20web.jpg

There is no substitute for victory.

 

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Dargo2, down here the locals are living in delusions and Southern Gothic drama of their own making. From what I have come to learn about the folks down here in the last 19 months is this: Their obesity rates come from an incredibly lousy diet and for some of them, the continual stress of living in active denial.

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I can recommend to both you and Dargo2 , _The Greater Journey_ by David McCullough. The chapters about the Americans in Paris at the time of the Civil War is particularly interesting and about the Parisians -paradoxical.

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I completely agree w/you, Fred, and kudos your research! And how about that Douglas Montgomery? Remember last time you saw him was opposite Marion Davies in a really good comedy, whose title, of course, I've forgotten.

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I'm watching the 1949 version again tonight. It is so wonderful. The color is fantastic, the sets look like they are in the 1860s, the acting and casting are perfect. The direction is great and so is the photography and the lighting.

 

This is so realistic. This reminds me of my childhood in the South. :) Ahh, the good old days.

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That is one movie I never ever get bored watching, I read the book when I was little and have been hooked ever since....truly the age of innocense, unlike today...:)

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