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TCMfan23

why does modern cinema stink ?

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> Too bad I was born when the 80's ended. Life was way better in the 20th century.

 

Nostalgia always makes us wish for an era we only imagine. And in our imagination, the grass is always greener in the era we don't currently live.

 

But history reminds us that those previous eras/decades/century were, in actuality, no greener than the one we inhabit right now.

 

Case in point (though not meant to be a comprehensive history)

 

The 20th Century:

 

The 1900s- in our minds it's a great decade ala *The Strawberry Blonde*. In reality, it was a decade of incredible wealth for a very few and incredible poverty for the majority. New York City teemed with tenements, in California the Native Sons of the Golden West began a multi-year cultural attack against Latinos, Chinese and Japanese going so far as to outlaw the owning of property by Chinese and Japanese. Jim Crow ruled not only in the South but throughout the country. African Americans could not live in certain neighborhoods, couldn't eat at lunch counters, restaurants, use bathrooms or drinking fountains that white people used. They were regulated to the back of the bus and signs across America proclaimed, "Whites Only".

 

1910s- the World went to war to end all wars and thousands of men were sacrificed to keep the world safe from fascism. Gas warfare was used and what bullets and bombs didn't maim, gas did.

 

1920s- Prohibition was enacted and America went dry, the Mob saw an in and organized crime went on the rise as Americans defied the law of the land and continued to drink despite the prohibition. Also, in the wake of World War I, a lost generation of men and women entered the history books. From Oklahoma to the Dakotas, farmers, especially wheat farmers, over planted the land and rode the wave of high profits never realizing that the wave had to end.

 

1930s- the Stock Market crashed sending the world into a world wide depression. In Germany, Adolph Hitler began his rise to leadership. No one knew the horrors he had in store for Jews, gypsy and gays.

 

In America, breadlines and soup kitchens replaced the Roaring '20s. Outlaws like Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd and others became folk heroes. The wheat farmers of America came face to face with their overplanting and over harvesting of the land and the Dust Bowl became a reality. On Black Sunday, a dust cloud from Oklahoma engulfed the country from Oklahoma to NY and out over the Atlantic. Families were wiped out and the largest migration since the Civil War began as families left their homes and headed west to a better life. In California, the Native Sons of the Golden West mobilized against the "Okies" and the disenfranchised to keep California "pristine".

 

Germany began its march across Europe engulfing whole countries and setting up concentration camps. As countries fell, England managed to hold on. In Asia, Japan began a similar conquest.

 

1940s- the World went to war. Six million Jews lost their lives in concentration camps as did an equal number of gypsies and gays. America mobilized and women entered the workforce. While America mobilized, planted victory gardens and rationed food, thousands of men and women died for their country and thousands more came home maimed or with psychological problems.

 

In America, Japanese were rounded up and sent to interment camps until the end of the war. They lost their homes, their businesses and their livelihoods. Many of their sons, who were draft age, joined the war effort and became some of the most decorated soldiers of the war. But their parents and their families stayed behind barb wire and under guard. Their only crime, being Japanese.

After the war, women were forced out of the defense factories and back to the kitchen. They couldn't own property, couldn't have credit cards in their own names and were expected to return to the home without missing a beat. Jim Crow laws still reigned.

 

America dropped atomic bombs on Japan in an effort to end the war and the world wouldl be changed forever.

 

1950s- the world entered a Cold War against Russia. War was declared in Korea. While America underwent a baby boom, an undercurrent of unease reigned. Betty Freidan tapped into women's discontent and Grace Metalious tapped into the unspoken sexuality.

 

1960s- John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Teenaged African Americans began to rebel against Jim Crow and staged sit-ins at lunch counters in southern cities. Segregationists reacted and turned fire hoses and dogs on Civil Rights protestors. Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King, Jr, Malcolm X and Bobby Kennedy were killed.

America went to war in Vietnam and the country was never the same. At the same time, the counter culture began to take hold.

Horrified by the nightly news of the Vietnam War, America began to vocally protest the war and take to the streets.

 

The decade became the most decisive decade in a hundred years as the country came close to a second civil war. The 1968 Democratic convention erupted into a police state in Chicago. Dan Rather was punched on the floor of the convention during the evening broadcast and the police attacked protestors outside the convention.

 

Walter Cronkite, the most trusted man in America, came out against the war in Vietnam and America listened.

In July of 1969, Neil Armstrong walked on the moon and less than a month later, Charles Manson ordered his followers out into the night and they killed Sharon Tate and six others before their murder spree came to an end.

 

1970s- tired of years in the kitchen and the closet, women and gays took a page from the Civil Rights movement and began their own movements. Watergate was uncovered and Americans became even more discouraged about their government. The War in Vietnam ended, not with a clear cut victory ala WWII, but with the last helicopter out of Saigon.

 

That's just part of the story (the 1980s and 1990s have both good and bad) but the fact reminds that it wasn't all sunshine and lollipops.

 

And while it's always fun to imagine that it was so much better back then, the fact reminds, that for all the high points and successes of the century, the other side of the coin was just as real, just as difficult and just as oppressive.

 

It's been a hard fought history and looking back at it through rose colored glasses, while fun, tends to overshadow the hard-won victories as well as the pain and hardship that many endured that are just as much of that history.

 

Edited by: lzcutter for punctuation

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> TV : reality tv has completely taken over.

 

You really need to broaden your television viewing. Reality TV has completely taken over and everything sucks?

 

Then how do you explain:

 

*Breaking Bad, Mad Men, Justified, Game of Thrones, Homeland, Boardwalk Empire, Suits, The Walking Dead, Person of Interest, Boss, The Newsroom, Sons of Anarchy, Downtown Abby, Sherlock Holmes* among others.

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Izcutter,

 

all of those shows are garbage. When I said reality tv has taken over. I didn't mean every single channel.

 

nothing new today will ever be as good as classic TV (50's through 70's).

 

I'll watch The Waltons over Modern Family any day of the week.

 

i'm 23 years old. I know garbage when I see it. And I know garbage when I hear it.

 

Edited by: TCMfan23 on Aug 24, 2012 3:11 AM

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TCM23's back at complaining again...thanks LZ for such a nice long detailed posting....ole 23 never bothered to read it.

 

>EVERYTHING new sucks. Admit it people.

>today's cars suck

 

Oh contraire. Ride in any vintage car and you'll be amazed how they rode like a tin can. Todays vehicles are cushy, luxury comfy and smooth. I drive a pick up for work and it feels like a Cadillac. Great radio, air conditioning, bucket seats, safety features, lighting, storage, etc.

 

>Every car on the road was made in America. Madeo ut of sheet metal and chrome.

 

And people knew how to spell.

Dashboards are now plastic because it's SAFER. You want gas efficiency, you need a lighter vehicle. (our other car is a Prius, less comfy than my work pick up)

 

>today's movies suck

>today's music sucks

>today's fashions suck

 

Only if you stay within your leetle US teen confines. Spread out-the rest of the world still caters to adults.

 

I often find US Americans just think inside their little US bubbles. Canadians are far more "globally" thinking and Europeans even more so. There's a heck of a lot of great music/film/fashion coming out of Africa & East Asia these days too.

 

>everything has gotten more complicated. every thing , including kitchen appliances has too many buttions.

 

HA! I use vintage appliances and "more push buttons" were a modern addition for the jet age 50's/60's.

 

OK, now my feeling about modern US film:

 

When I see a modern film I enjoy getting a bite afterwards & discuss the movie we just saw. When asking others for a synopsis of the story, you'd be amazed how often it's "To kill the bad guy".

Contrast that with describing complicated stories of Now Voyager, Angels With Dirty Faces or even Mad Love.

 

In the recent "end credits" thread, it was said that people these days "rush to the door" to leave at the end of a movie. I speculated this was because movies no longer have any sort of emotional impact. What you just saw is instantly forgotten.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}TCM23's back at complaining again...thanks LZ for such a nice long detailed posting....ole 23 never bothered to read it.

Yep...yawn. 1674.gif

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> {quote:title=TCMfan23 wrote:}{quote}EVERYTHING new sucks. Admit it people.

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> today's cars suck

> today's movies suck

> today's music sucks

> today's fashions suck

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> *Not if you get the right ones. You're simply limiting yourself, which is why you generalized those things like that.*

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> today's people suck. everyone is too busy texting on their crappy iphones to notice what's going on around them. I have a cell phone , but rarely use it. And I'm young.

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> *That's kinda rude to simply say that about EVERYONE. What you really mean is the lack of simple common courtesy...which is what it really comes down to...and that I would agree with. There's not as much simple common courtesy these days.*

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> today's economy sucks

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> *When doesn't it?*

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> and so much other stuff sucks.

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> *Such as? Don't just generalize like that...be specific. Otherwise, you just sound as though you're saying these negative things out of spite to get people riled up for nothing.*

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> Too bad I was born when the 80's ended. Life was way better in the 20th century.

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> *If you were born at the end of the 80's...then how can you generalize like that about the 20th century when you were born at the END of it? You didn't experience much of it, so how can you criticize it so unfairly like that?*

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> movies were better

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> *Not necessarily better...just different. You can still watch what was filmed PRIOR to this century. You don't have to watch newer movies....Oh wait. You still complain about some of the older movies even on TCM.*

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> music was real music

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> *I almost agree with that....I think better much was created years ago, but that doesn't mean I have to listen to today's music (because I don't).*

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> fashions were better - everyone dressed for the occasion. Men wore hats and pocket watches. They looked classy.

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> *Style goes through a lot of changes every now and then.*

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> the economy was booming and so were the birth rates (1950's)

> every automobile had individual style. Every car on the road was

> made in America. Madeo ut of sheet metal and chrome.

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> children and adults had manners and respected each other.

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> *Not always...but so many young people today also lack the common courtesy thing I mentioned above.*

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> children were allowed to be spanked. and parents were never put in jail for it.

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> *There I'll partly agree as far as things like "political correctness" and certain legal things that I do feel have gotten way out of hand in our society.*

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> sex was like a bad word. never talked openly like today.

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> *...so you're saying it's a BAD thing that people can talk openly about sex? Nonsense.*

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> No one gave a darn if you smoked and no one cared if it was bad.

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> *Strange as this may sound, I'm a smoker, but I consider myself a considerate smoker. I don't smoke around non-smokers. That's simple consideration. Period.*

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> every one was in shape. Today , everyone is eiyher obese or overweight.

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> *That's a common and well-know fact today...people are less health-conscious. Agreed.*

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> every thing was a lot more cheaper.

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> *Depends on what it is. As the economy fluctuates and costs go up, so do the prices of things. That's a fact of life. Get a job that pays more so you can afford more, then.*

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> going to the movies was a special occasion. It wasn't a texting session like today. Now , everyone just goes there to ruin everyone's experince.Tickets were a dime and the movies were better.

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> *I agree the moviegoing experience of yesterday is gone. It's not like it used to be years ago.*

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> soda came in 16 oz glass bottles and had real sugar. Today , they're in 12 oz aluminum cans and plastic bottles. And are made with corn syrup.

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> *NONSENSE. Sugar is sitll used in some instances, and glass isn't used because it's DANGEROUS if broken or chipped. There are also any other forms of sweeteners used for various reasons.*

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> candy bars and other food is half the size they were in the past and cost more.

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> *Agree there, partially...prepackaged food portions are smaller than they used to be.*

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> everything has gotten more complicated. every thing , including kitchen appliances has too many buttions.

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> *So get used to it and LEARN it. That's a fact of life.*

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Everything in *bold* above is my response to each complaint point.

 

By the way..."why does modern cinema stink " was the title of this thread...which seems to have next to nothing to do with that subject. ;)

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> Breaking Bad, Mad Men, Suits,

 

I could never get into those. It wasn't the production values or the performances; they just didn't click with me.

 

> Justified, Game of Thrones, Homeland, Boardwalk Empire, The Walking Dead, Person of Interest, Boss, The Newsroom, Sons of Anarchy,

 

I don't get premium channels.

 

> Downtown Abby,

 

I'm not into soap operas, even British ones.

 

> Sherlock Holmes

 

Great! It's a shame 4 episodes constitute a season.

 

My list would be White Collar, Haven, Warehouse 13, Merlin, and (somewhat) Burn Notice (it's jumped the shark but still watchable).

 

For reality tv, Life Without People, Geologic Journey, Lost Worlds, and Through the Wormhole are interesting and thought provoking.

 

For reality tv that's supposedly real people sequestered in a competition, the obvious choice is Face Off (odd premise, and they do fantastic work).

 

The biggest disappointment recently is Eureka ending. It was witty, outrageous, and a little thought provoking. Way over the top, but it didn't take itself seriously.

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I think cinema isn't as good as it used to be for economic reasons. Mostly kids go to the movies now so the filmakers have to cater to them. The stories and acting are bad but the technology is breathtaking. And television has fallen off a cliff so to speak, but that's a money thing too. There are hundreds of channels available so the viewers are much more fragmented. Before cable you only had 3 channels to watch new shows, and the networks had the revenue to invest in quality shows because they were going to get advertising money based on the amount of viewers. Reality shows are dirt cheap to make compared to regular tv shows so the profit is higher. But there are good TV shows especially on cable TV. The viewing public has so many alternatives to traditional films/tv now (like the internet and gaming systems), and people simply are not tied to a screen either at home (tv) or in a theatre. The economies of scale that existed back when one either went to the movies or watched one of 3 tv networks for entertainment simply aren't there anymore. And making movies ain't cheap, so the people running the movie *business* are producing things that they think will make money.

 

 

But there *are* good films being made (especially tv series). Plus, there was a lot of bad stuff on television and movie screens in the "classic" era. But one isn't aware of them because only the best stuff is being shown. So the impression is given that *all* of the stuff being made way back when was good, since that is are the films/programs we're seeing.

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> {quote:title=TCMfan23 wrote:}{quote}

> everything has gotten more complicated. every thing , including kitchen appliances has too many buttions.

 

I have a blender built in 1956.

 

With a simple twist of a knob, pulling out one block, and putting in another, you can change whether you want the high speed, low torque, or the medium speed, medium torque, or the low speed, high torque motor.

 

With a simple twist of another knob, you can slip out the main gear block and replace it with another to further refine your speed/torque choice.

 

There are 9 different containers for it, ranging from a teacup glass one to a 2 quart stainless steel with locking lid (locking as it requires a key).

 

Each of them, of course, has a simple way to change the blades (16 different kinds).

 

It's a great and wonderful machine!

 

*But for daily use, give me a modern one with a dozen buttons.*

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Took me three pages to realise I shouldn't take this thread seriously. The OP thinks everything sucks but doesn't give many thought provoking reasons.

 

Nice to see the tastes of people in some good tv series.. .maybe we can have an off topic TV thread made.

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TCM, I stopped on your post about "Everything new sucks" and just had to reply.

 

 

I don't totally agree, but largely, I do.

 

 

I was born when the 50's STARTED, so between us, I had the misfortune of watching all this erosion happen.

 

 

Today's cars suck only in that they are built with inferior materials. But on the other hand, the GOOD materials cost so much that to build cars with them would mean they'd be priced far out of most people's reach. AND the mileage is better in the new ones. We don't really need cars that weigh as much as three new cars as did the older models.

 

 

Not all of today's movies suck, but the ratio between "good" and "suck" is getting smaller.

 

 

Today's music? If you're talking mainstream "top 40", then we're in full agreement. You have to comb through the public and college radio stations to find new music that's fit to hear.

 

 

I don't give a sh** about fashion. As far as I'm concerned, it's only clothes. What DOES suck, to me, is the OBSESSION with it. WHO CARES what someone wears on the "Red Carpet"? Or WHO they're wearing. Was a time that those who concerned themselves with which designer created which line of clothing were considered presumptuous snobs, and REAL people had better things to do with their time. What really bothers me is the trend to "slob up" occaisions that once required formal dress. When my wife and I went to a grand niece's first communion, we dressed the part. Or so I thought. Not being a regular church goer, I assumed that out of respect and traditionally it would be proper to don what some used to call their "Sunday best". She wore a nice conservative dress, and I wore a suit. With the exception of a few other "old timers", the rest of the congregation were dressed as if they were coming to a backyard barbeque. Some kid in the pew in front of me was wearing a Jimi Hendrix T-shirt!

 

 

Everybody wears those silly looking ball caps.

 

 

And they don't remove them when they enter a public place or someone's home.

 

 

And many of them wear them with the bill turned every direction except the CORRECT one.

 

 

No one seems to take other people into consideration. It's as if everyone thinks THEY are the only people on Earth and the only ones that matter.

 

 

Parents don't spank children anymore because parents no longer let THEMSELVES be in charge. They ASK their children PLEASE to do something rather then TELL them to.

 

 

They no longer even bother to teach their kids to respect other people's property. They'll bring their kids to your home and bristle if you DARE to tell the brat to leave some fragile, valuble family heirloom the f**k alone.

 

 

When I was a kid, we had what we called "The Network". Your parents knew everyone within a 10 block radius, and if one of them saw you doing some mischief, they'd be on the phone to Mom, and you'd get your butt blistered once you returned home and walked in the door. Try telling someone you saw their kid doing something they shouldn't, and you'll hit a wall of denial! "Not MY baby!" you'll hear, and it will be the end of whatever firendship you and that parent had. And it wasn't rare that it was accepted that ANYone in the family, if at hand, would dole out the butt whoopin' if you caused trouble. You DARED not complain to Mom and Dad about it, because it would only result in another butt whoopin'. NOW, that family member would likely get sued.

 

 

I could go on, but you all get my drift I think.

 

 

And it's called "progress"?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Lazyking wrote:}{quote}The OP thinks everything sucks but doesn't give many thought provoking reasons.

More precisely, the OP said that everything sucks without giving valid reasons. Whether or not he really believes that or not is another matter entirely. Simply saying those things without further justification is just instigation. ]:)

 

Also, everything else he complained about has nothing to do with the subject "Why does modern cinema stink?". Why even title the thread that way if it's not going to be about modern cinema? ?:|

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Hey, I'm back! :)

 

I couldn't log in or post anything for nearly 3 days, but all of a sudden this morning, I can log in and post again.

 

Somebody musta fixed something.

 

If I disappear again, it will be the same problem again. This same thing happened to me last February. When I tried to log in, I was taken to the TCM.COM AUTHENTICATING.... page, it locked up there and stayed on that page forever. My screen never left that page and it never logged me in and didn't return me to the forum.

 

But I tried again this morning and I was able to log on ok.

 

I wonder if other people are having this problem? If we can't log in, we can't tell anyone that we can't log in.

 

I'm glad to be back.

 

FredCDobbs

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> {quote:title=TCMfan23 you say: }{quote}to me , Hollywood films have turned to garbage. Since the 80s , movies have been getting worse and worse. At the turn of the century , Hollywood writers have run out of ideas.

 

 

Having been part of the “Old Hollywood School” of sorts and now retired, I would have to say it shouldn’t be a question that modern cinema simply stinks. Like it is in life, all things change or we move on towards different directions that suit each and every generation. An example I could give over this topic pertains to a film student I once chatted with about the motion picture business. The student seemed well versed enough to understand the mechanics of movie making, but not its overall past history. In the course of our conversation, I got onto the subject of movie stars and such, mentioning the work of Jack Lemmon. When I asked the student what film of Jack’s they admired or felt was of quality, the answer was they never looked into Jack’s body of work, not finding him so variable to the current trends and that Jack was nothing more than a faint object of the past. At that moment in time, I did become a bit agitated, wondering if the student had any sense of motion picture history. What I later realized was that the student’s mode of thinking was totally in a different area, unable to link my past with their current tangibility. This I think happens regularly enough to the point that the values or interests in filmmaking change. It isn’t an easy task to remain flexible from a view of seeking new avenues to creative expression and therefore the mindset of ideas, imagery and subject matter expand to a divergent area. This is the normal way of how the situation turns out, especially since society as a whole, moves on towards changeable atmospheres of social epitomes and what is considered popular subject matter.

 

 

If one has a love or devotion to certain elements and patterns of our motion picture past, there must come a condition towards understanding the differences between the past and the current flow of creativity or what essentially becomes a popular mode of filmmaking. The changes brought on by time and circumstance are just different and shouldn’t be judged so harshly, since each and every generation of moviemakers have to face all sorts of technical problems and a difference to the values society hands us along the way of how time changes our lives. There are times I might feel I miss the past and wished for a return to these certain methods of motion picture expression I was exposed to and learned from. However, in the process of growing old and becoming tolerant to accepting life’s shifting patterns, I now find it best to simply say my place in time and all its contingency was different and can’t be compared to the point of judging or feeling that my generation was so much better. Each and every different generation of the creative artistic force has its own values, it’s own place to express what they believe to be coherent to the current flow of society’s thinking. As for me, I simply have to accept that my time and place that was different is not any better or above what new and fresh ideas of expression come our way. After all, what has brought on lots of the changes to the entertainment field is technology! This I think is the underlying, missed point as to why nothing stays the same or can remain so traditional.

 

 

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I was born when the 50's STARTED,

 

Me too, me too, me too! What a glorious decade in which to grow up. The 1930s and 1940s were better, much except for WWII, but I'd be dead by now were I born then, so I'm happy for the 1950s.

 

And TCMfan, you're being too generous, movies have started to stink since 1960, and stuff in general has stunk since the greedy offshoring 1990s. I'll be very generous and say stuff wasn't bad in the 1980s. STUFF, not you know who.

 

Since then? Fuggedaboudit.

 

What really bothers me is the trend to "slob up" occaisions that once required formal dress.

 

Sepiatone, I recently went to a Broadway play, and having not been to a play in a long time, 'thought' the dress was different than fine dining or special occasions, where slob is the new dress or even dress casual. BOY, was I wrong. There they were, the slobs in jeans and SHORTS! At a *play*. And so it goes.

 

Yes, and yes, and yes to the rest of your post. The only saving grace is that you and I are still alive to kvetch about it AND are old enough to be ignored when we do kvetch. No, it ain't progress, it's 2012.

 

Be glad we won't be around in the year 2525. :):):):):)

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Fred, I have had minor problems, but nothing like yours!

 

I have FIOS, which overcharges but doesn't hold stations hostage like Cablevision, what carrier do you use?

 

Glad you're back.

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Hey Fred,

 

Did you happen to make a change in your browser like MovieMadness suggested in his post from August 23rd at 2:58 PM?

 

> Fred you need to download another browser to use on the internet, just download Firefox and use that. Microsoft is clueless now on how to make things work anymore. http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/

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> Fred you need to download another browser to use on the internet, just download Firefox and use that. Microsoft is clueless now on how to make things work anymore. http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/

 

I don't know if he did or not? But I downloaded Firefox awhile ago and it works just great!

IE 8 no work too well... Had problems so said f**k it and downloaded Mozilla...

 

Now have both browsers but never use IE 8... Sorry Microsoft...

But IE 8 is just a web browser. There are many others available too, besides Firefox...

Whatever works...

 

Anyway, back to modern cinema... I do have a bias against many modern and younger film critics in that they don't seem to have any knowledge of classic films besides those very few that they learn about in Film Studies classes. The same goes for foreign films. They just seem to be aware of those they learned about in school. Nothing else exists to them...

For a film buff like myself, with some knowledge of classic films amd foreign films, I ain't too impressed. And the same goes for modern audiences too.

But I guess it isn't the fault of movie audiences that they aren't more sophisticated.

You can't blame a young filmgoer today for not knowing who Kay Francis was, for example.

The same doesn't go for some smart-aleck young film critic...

IMHO, if you wanna be a film critic, you gotta know about classic films and have a good knowledge of foreign films, and not just a few... (Can I have an "Amen!")

 

And I think the same bias applies to modern film directors and studio people...

Yes, some modern filmmakers in Hollywood and abroad in foreign countries are original and make excellent movies. But there also is a lot of crap. Derivative without the people responsible even being aware of it, it seems...

 

There are exceptions, like I wrote above. One such, to me, is Quentin Tarantino.

Say what you will about his films, but he uses lots of old film references in his movies.

You could spend a lot of time trying to figure out from what old films he borrowed stuff from, and he's open about it too.

 

His new film "Django Unchained" he says was influenced by, among others, the 1966 Spaghetti Western "Django": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_(film)

 

Anyway, as usual there are many other old movie influences in his latest flick too:

http://unchainedmovie.com/

 

(No, Tarantino ain't paying me to plug his film here... But that's a good idea, eh??? He can send his cheque c/o TCM Message Board Community and we'll split it...)

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Bravo.. best post in this thread.

> {quote:title=MovieProfessor wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=TCMfan23 you say: }{quote}to me , Hollywood films have turned to garbage. Since the 80s , movies have been getting worse and worse. At the turn of the century , Hollywood writers have run out of ideas.

>

> Having been part of the “Old Hollywood School” of sorts and now retired, I would have to say it shouldn’t be a question that modern cinema simply stinks. Like it is in life, all things change or we move on towards different directions that suit each and every generation. An example I could give over this topic pertains to a film student I once chatted with about the motion picture business. The student seemed well versed enough to understand the mechanics of movie making, but not its overall past history. In the course of our conversation, I got onto the subject of movie stars and such, mentioning the work of Jack Lemmon. When I asked the student what film of Jack’s they admired or felt was of quality, the answer was they never looked into Jack’s body of work, not finding him so variable to the current trends and that Jack was nothing more than a faint object of the past. At that moment in time, I did become a bit agitated, wondering if the student had any sense of motion picture history. What I later realized was that the student’s mode of thinking was totally in a different area, unable to link my past with their current tangibility. This I think happens regularly enough to the point that the values or interests in filmmaking change. It isn’t an easy task to remain flexible from a view of seeking new avenues to creative expression and therefore the mindset of ideas, imagery and subject matter expand to a divergent area. This is the normal way of how the situation turns out, especially since society as a whole, moves on towards changeable atmospheres of social epitomes and what is considered popular subject matter.

>

>

> If one has a love or devotion to certain elements and patterns of our motion picture past, there must come a condition towards understanding the differences between the past and the current flow of creativity or what essentially becomes a popular mode of filmmaking. The changes brought on by time and circumstance are just different and shouldn’t be judged so harshly, since each and every generation of moviemakers have to face all sorts of technical problems and a difference to the values society hands us along the way of how time changes our lives. There are times I might feel I miss the past and wished for a return to these certain methods of motion picture expression I was exposed to and learned from. However, in the process of growing old and becoming tolerant to accepting life’s shifting patterns, I now find it best to simply say my place in time and all its contingency was different and can’t be compared to the point of judging or feeling that my generation was so much better. Each and every different generation of the creative artistic force has its own values, it’s own place to express what they believe to be coherent to the current flow of society’s thinking. As for me, I simply have to accept that my time and place that was different is not any better or above what new and fresh ideas of expression come our way. After all, what has brought on lots of the changes to the entertainment field is technology! This I think is the underlying, missed point as to why nothing stays the same or can remain so traditional.

>

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>Did you happen to make a change in your browser like MovieMadness suggested in his post from August 23rd at 2:58 PM?

 

No, I haven't changed anything. I was going to download the other browser next week if nothing changed.

 

I deleted all my cookies but that didn't help. I re-registered but that didn't help. I tried to log in late last night and could not. I tried again this morning around 5:45 and it finally logged me in the first time I tried. So nothing has changed on my side of it. Someone at TCM must have fixed something between late last night and this morning. I'm still using IE 8.

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> {quote:title=}{quote}At that moment in time, I did become a bit agitated, wondering if the student had any sense of motion picture history. What I later realized was that the student’s mode of thinking was totally in a different area, unable to link my past with their current tangibility. This I think happens regularly enough to the point that the values or interests in filmmaking change.

 

 

 

Yes, that's a good point... Happens to all oldtimers vis a vis young'uns...

Things change whether you is discussing cars, music, machinery, etc....

 

Guess I shouldn't be such an old crank... And a young'un could argue that I haven't seen many modern films (a few good Hollywood ones and foreign cinema excepted) and so am about as knowledgeable about modern movies as the young'uns are about classic films...

 

Thanks prof...

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Someone mentioned on another thread that boring people like boring movies. It follows that people who stink also like movies that stink.

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