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rosinryanz

Films that No Studios Wanted to Make

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What were some movies that no studio wanted to make but ended up being great successes, either comercially or artistically?

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Hi, Rosinryanz:

 

I can think of one best-selling book in particular that took several years to bring to the screen because no studio would touch it with a 100-foot poll. It was just too controversial when it was first published in 1927.

 

The novel I'm talking about is "Elmer Gantry," by Sinclair Lewis. Burt Lancaster won his only Oscar playing the charasmatic preacher. I think the Hayes Code was also a factor in the film not being brought to the screen.

 

Even when they did film "Elmer Gantry," they only filmed a very small percentage of the book. I've read the novel, which is around 420 pages. Of that 420 pages, only about seventy pages of the novel are actually filmed in Burt Lancaster film.

 

Also, the role of Lulu Bains was totally changed by the director. In the novel, Lulu was not what she was in the film.

 

Deborah

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that Capra's "It Happened One Night" was not high up on the list to be made.

 

What with both Gable and Colbert not too keen on it, I would say it must have been a pleasant surprise to both how great it turned out.

 

I can't remember if the studio was totally against it, but with both stars balking they might not have thought too much good would come of it.

 

 

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I think Eastwood had trouble selling Million Dollar Baby, if I recall. Boy, what a windfall that was!

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John Ford's "The Quiet Man". He purchased the rights to the story in the 1930s and couldn't get any studio interested. It wasn't till his "cavalry tilogy" made so much money for Republic Pictures that its president Hebert J. Yates agreed to make the film as a favor for Ford. If you can imagine, he wanted to make it in black & white on the back lot. Thank goodness Ford held his ground and insisted on filming in Ireland and shooting in color.

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Shooting scripts forThe Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity had to be rewritten numerous times before the censors would give the ok for production to begin. Even with outstanding performances by Stanwyck, McMurray, and Robinson, initial audience reaction in 1944 was rather lukewarm.

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