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deeanddaisy666

Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle....

21 posts in this topic

do the majority of folks here like him or appreciate his talent?

 

I tried yesterday, I honestly tried, but I had to turn away. The implied women abuse, the 'humor', just disgusted me.

 

I did notice that Buster Keaton was in one of his movies.

 

BTW, this impression has nothing to do with what he was accused of, I believe that was a frame. But I was taken aback by my strong reaction to this man.

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i think he was a very talented man. talented, but not as funny as the other silent comedians. i watched some of his silent movies monday. i liked them. i especially liked the one that co-starred one of my favorite stars-- Buster Keaton

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I taped them, but haven't seen them yet.

 

Will now be very interested in them, to see how I feel. The only thing I really know about him is the scandal that ended his career, and also feel that was a frame up.

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I make up my own mind about if I like a performer, regardless of their previous rep...but just like Harold Lloyd, I think that some silent comedians who were revered in their time frame, do not hold up so well in later times.

 

For example, Harold Lloyd. Now don't get me wrong and I hope this is not anathema....I have read books on him, I have older relatives who will tell you that he was perhaps more adored than Keaton, or Chaplin and more popular, I have old movie magazines with articles about him, I was amazed anew at that clock scene in "Safety Last" which I watched again last nite, and his acrobatic heroics are well done, particularly with a fake prosthetic hand glove, that covered his missing digits...but I find much of his humor quite dated.

 

I can watch Chaplin forever and Keaton, but only Lloyd every once in a while. As so, I find Arbuckle.

 

I think he is a product of his times, and I occasionally get a chuckle, but he is a bit trying. Now any acts which now would not be politically correct are not the problem for me, it is just that Keaton and Chaplin are a bit more than just into the comedy mode, which is why I like them more.

 

I guess they were ahead of their time.

 

One wonders what you think of Harry Langdon?

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All of the original Keystone Studio movies from 1915 to 1920 where wonderful. You have to put the era in context with the times and not impose your politicaly correct 21st century attitudes to them. That's why I really respect Charley Chase, Charley Chaplin, Fatty Arbuckle and all of the silent movies that we now deem unappropriated.

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Sorry, but again I do not support the contention that Harold Lloyd's work is more dated, any less timeless than that of Chaplin or Keaton's! Pure Hogwash! An idea proposed by modern critics in the 60's and 70's, that just doesn't hold up under closer unbiased study! In the late 70's, much the same was being said about Chaplin's films! Most of which, came from Keaton afficionado's who seem to have made it their sworn duty to elevate Buster's reputation at Charlie's expense at any and all cost! It's my experience that the average audience with no pre-disposition to their films, find Lloyd just as contemporary, if not the most contemporary of the great silent comedians!

 

As for Arbuckle, I greatly enjoyed his forgotten, and once lost 1921 feature ?LEAP YEAR? yesterday! My previous exposure to ?Roscoe?s work had been fairly limited. Mostly the early Keystone?s, and snippets of his independent shorts. Now I have to say I am much more intrigued with him, than I previously have been. The same can be said for ?the King of the Shorts during the 20's? Charley Chase.

 

 

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Gagman, I totally agree with you. Many people seem jaded and try to fob off any reason why they don't like a particular comedian.

I find Arbuckle to have been an extraordinary talent considering that he, like his celluloid brethren (Chaplin, Keaton,et al) had to churn these exhaustingly acrobatic , and sometimes dangerous films out at almost the same frequency that newspapers would be put out.

Each comic had their own distinct personality and each of their collective works should be appreciated for what it's worth. Granted, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but to trash any of these artists on a whim is absolutely uncalled for and unjust.

And on that note I think that TCM should get their own round of applause for the inclusion of these films on this month's comedy festival.

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It wasn't a whim, redspider74. I watched a couple of different shorts very closely, and the near striking of a woman did not impress me as 'funny'.

 

By the same token, I didn't find the portrayal of abuse to him by his 'wife' on the beach as funny. I am aware that this was a different time, and wife beating was an accepted activity. But neither that nor husband abuse causes me to laugh.

 

I also notice that Harold Lloyd didn't include near wife beating in his comedy. I don't find him dated, I find him clever.

 

Also, I don't find evaluations of the cinema to be 'trashing' them. I reacted to the particular 'humor' of an episode, and feel this board is grown up enough to accept my views, as I accept those of others.

 

And I dislike Harry Langdon, he ripped off Harold Lloyd.

 

dolores

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I recorded all the Arbuckle's TCM aired yesterday, but so far I have only watched the last three two-reelers and the feature. I assume "Stoney" that it was an earlier Keystone product that you are objecting to, but I don't know? "Roscoe" never laid a hand on any of the girls in the films I have seen so far? Those rarely seen and little known two-reelers were surprisingly good in my opinion. I enjoyed them quite a bit.

 

Arbuckle had considerably more charm not just as a comedian, but as a film maker than I had previously been led to believe. It's a shame that both He and Charley Chase have been largely forgotten! "Fatty" is probably better known for the scandal that destroyed his career today, than he is for his films?

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Leap Year is the only one that I did'nt get to record and see. I hope they play it again soon so that I can see it. The others were really great, I did get to DVD record them and they are so funny. What a treat. Great programming. Great classics.

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It seems I owe an apology to Arbuckle. It wasn't he who feigned the abuse of women, it was the supporting characters in his movies. And I have seen near female (and male, e.g., Laurel and Hardy) abuse in many silents and talkies from that era that was supposed to pass for comedy.

 

However, when I said that his humor left me cold, I meant Roscoe's. I don't know what it was exactly about the man, but his fey helplessness at the hands of his wife is one example.

 

Obviously, and this is why I raised the topic, it is just me. I don't like Charlie Chaplin one little bit either, so it must be all in my own little head.

 

Thank you for your answers.

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Gagman, it's great to see you posting again! Like you and most others here-in who have expressed their appreciation for these early and very rare Gems, I watched most of Charley Chase's films and all of "Fatty" Arbuckle's on Monday, and having NEVER seen their work before I was delighted to finally have the chance, thanks to TCM.

 

Each of these early comedians had their own "personality" on film, and each of them was playing to a specific audience of the times, which is hard to miss for those of us who pay attention to this as open-minded and mature students of this great body of early film work.

Naturally, we all have our personal "favorites", and are more than entitled to express our personal opinions about these comedians and their films, and hopefully with a shred of "respect" when we do. As I have become more familiar with each of them over time, I find a lot more to like and enjoy than to "trash" as I watch all of these early comedians and their films, and I encourage others who might be seeing some of these early films for the first time, too, to please avoid being swayed by remarks being posted here that beg us to look at these comedians and their films through the eyes of those who can only see something or someone to "trash".

 

TCM is currently showing us a wonderful and important segment of Film History that deserves our unbiased, and untainted observation (this, of course is my opinion), and so many of these films are absolute GEMS that we're not likely to see anywhere else unless we go out and purchase them, if we can even find them! Thank you, TCM! Great job, as always! :)ML

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>> I encourage others who might be seeing some of these early films for the first time, too, to please avoid being swayed by remarks being posted here that beg us to look at these comedians and their films through the eyes of those who can only see something or someone to "trash".

 

 

ML, I am getting a little tired of your proselytizing. I was neither 'begging' anything of anyone, I wasn't ONLY seeing something or someone to 'trash', NOR do I appreciate your commanding everyone here to 'AVOID being swayed by remarks being posted here'.

 

My REMARKS, as you call them, are OPINIONS and I have as much right to voice them here as you do. I specifically stated so when I set up this thread and deferred to everyone's opinions in my last post.

 

When this TCM board becomes yours and yours alone to moderate, THEN you can attempt to censor me. Until then, realize that no one died and left you in charge.

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ML, I got good news for you. On May 24th a 4-DVD set "The Forgotten Films of Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle" will be available.

The collection includes 30 differnt films from the silent funnyman, including films he only directed, all restored with new music scores.

The films range from Arbuckle's frenetic early days including "The Knockout" (1914) with Charlie Chaplin.

The package is also loaded with many extras including original art from the comedian, a memorabilia gallery, audio commentary, and a 32 page booklet.

For more info you can go to www.laughsmith.com

 

And I agree with you about TCM giving all of us the chance to discover these wonderful silent screen comics for a whole new generation to enjoy and behold...once again. Good stuff.

 

Mongo

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i especially liked the one that co-starred one of my favorite stars-- Buster Keaton>>

 

Buster and Roscoe Arbuckle were good pals until Roscoe's death.

 

There was a Biography a few months back on Roscoe and they had an interview with Buster's late wife, Eleanor. She talked at length about their friendship.

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Hi Therealfuster,

 

I like most all the silent comedians except for Harry Langdon. I don't know, his childlike quality does not appeal to me as Chaplin's usually does--maybe it's because he's a bit too clown-like, and I'm one of those who's a bit creeped out by most clowns (never understood why).

 

Tops for me is Buster Keaton--just a personal bias. He's deceptively strong and capable behind that bumbling hangdog exterior, and in his silents he never has to wring from you the sympathy you come to feel for his characters before he turns his fortunes around. He never feels sorry for himself; he just keeps on. I also find him physically attractive.

 

 

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I was so happy to finally get to see Roscoe Arbuckles work. My favorite was Coney Island. It was great to see shots of old Coney Island. (I was there last in 1983-it was sad.) And when he put on that womans bathing suit-what a laugh!

 

Its a shame his career was cut short twice-once by scandal and then again by death. I would have liked to see what he would have done in the 'talkies'.

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have been the first here to use the term '"dated" concerning Lloyd [which now has taken on new life as a full fledged pejorative] I must desist, and agree with your remarks concerning feeling free to state one's opinion.

 

Saying a film is "dated" is not necessarily pejorative and is not synonymous with '"trashing" a film, yet if someone wants to "trash" a film, more power to them.

 

They may have good reason.

 

Being that I am quite the Lloyd fan, and own many of his films on 16mm, I still will stand by my claim that he is "dated", as is the wardrobe of Claudette Colbert in some films, which does not mean I don't appreciate her talents or Lloyd's, as I thought I clearly stated.

 

The contention by someone here, that people forcibly elevate Chaplin and Keaton over Lloyd, ignores the fact that by natural selection, it just may be that though all three comedians are equally talented, in different physical ways, that it's possible that there is more inherent depth and pathos to the films of Keaton and Chaplin which put them in some minds, on a higher plane, as a totality.

 

But...which of the three comedians, has films one might want to see again and again and again, might be the question.

 

I think one could make a good claim for that justification on some basis, yet all three comedians might receive the same audience response on a first time viewing of their films, as someone has said.

 

It has been said that the power of some books is based on one's desire to willingly reread them, and so too is the enigma of many films, which are certifiable classics.

 

I most certainly assumed that no one would be "swayed" to not watch Lloyd, based on my most complimentary remarks concerning his physical comedy prowess, just because I used the term "dated" as to his films.

 

I agree with you, Stoney that no adult needs to be censored as to their comments of adulation or criticism, which are expressed diplomatically, in opinions about films, or for that matter anything.

 

Are we not grown men [or women]? Or are we so "devo-id" of internal strength of character, that one person's remarks would so "sway" us to NOT watch a film?

 

Go to the House of Pain, if you are so easily "swayed" say I....

 

 

 

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Coney Island was my favorite one also. To see all the fun that was to be had at the turn of the century, in small amusement parks reminded me of the lost childhood I keep in my memories. I'm looking forward to the Marx Brothers, Chaplin and Buster Keaton marathons Friday and Monday. I've bought a 50 disk spindle of DVD-Rs at the beginning of April to hold them all and they are half used up.

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