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RMeingast

Thanksgiving In Canadaland

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Happy Thanksgiving to all my Canuck friends on message board!!!

 

And also to everybody else!!!

 

You wouldn't know it's Turkey Day from TCM's Canadian schedule 'tho...

 

Unless this scene from "Queen Christina" showing Grabo and Gilbert having drinks before diggin into the turkey and stuffing is included:

 

qc.jpg

 

Oh well... As we in Canada say on this special day - "Pass the beer can turkey, eh!"

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSRQympFq3JXYPU0uoz351

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Sorry, but I just never could get into calling Thanksgiving "Turkey Day". Besides sounding immature and insipid, it also sounds like it means we should REFRAIN from eating turkeys that day.

 

 

But have a nice holiday in spite of my curmudgeoness, Canada.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> Sorry, but I just never could get into calling Thanksgiving "Turkey Day". Besides sounding immature and insipid, it also sounds like it means we should REFRAIN from eating turkeys that day.

>

> But have a nice holiday in spite of my curmudgeoness, Canada.

>

>

> Sepiatone

>

 

 

My family had roast beef dinner on Sunday... No turkey this year...

Everybody's different - some have roast ham, pizza, Chinese food, burgers, whatever floats your boat, I guess... Many families have one gathering on Sunday with one side of family and relatives, another meal on Monday with the other side of family and relatives. But that's the same as in US...

 

I was just joking by using "Turkey Day"... ;)

 

Canadian Thanksgiving has been on different dates over the years and has regularly been on the second Monday of October officially since 1957. From 1931 to 1957 the date was announced yearly.

Have no idea why the second Monday was chosen?

Maybe because by American Thanksgiving we tend to have snow in the Great White North?

For example, we had the first frost of the season today - Thanksgiving Monday - where I live...

Chilly day...

But I'm not sure?

History here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving_%28Canada%29

 

In French Canada, the holiday is called "Jour de l'Action de grâce."

 

action-gr%C3%A2ce.JPG

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Yes, Happy Thanksgiving to all our Canadian neighbors and friends. I'm beginning to think though that everybody comes down here for the holiday. I live in a city about 80 miles south of the border and judging from all the Canadians at the malls, hotels and restaurants this weekend shopping must be as much a part of your holiday celebrations as it is with our Thanksgiving in November. No complaints, we're very happy to have you. :)

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mark, just to let you know, I don't usually like shopping, and do not view it as a recreational activity (unless it's for dvd's and cd's and books...ok, maybe the occasional cool outfit...)

 

The reason so many Canadians flock to the US to shop is because, despite our dollar now being at par with its American counterpart, ( and sometimes higher than), American goods are cheaper - as in "less expensive", not crummier - than the same goods in Canada.

This enrages me. I suppose it must have something to do with economies of scale, or taxes, or some other unsatisfactory reality that I cannot fully comprehend. Anyway, that's my rant of the day.

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RM, You forgot to mention that the most traditional Canadian Thanksgiving dinner is roast horse, although of late people have been enjoying horse tartare. Simmered in a beer reduction, and served with pate de foie gras from Canada geese.

 

Fred, you must be going crazy ! heh heh...

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> Sorry, but I just never could get into calling Thanksgiving "Turkey Day". Besides sounding immature and insipid, it also sounds like it means we should REFRAIN from eating turkeys that day.

>

 

What you must think of me - I just call it "T-Day." And, I rarely refrain from eating turkey on that day. :D

 

It makes sense that Canadian Thanksgiving would come before Thanksgiving in the US. After all, it is a harvest festival. Since Canada is further north that the US, the growing season ends earlier.

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Curious...I have read about the turkey. But what about

 

Green Bean casserole?

 

Candied Sweet Potatoes?

 

Pumpkin Pie?

h5. WAIT! Maybe it's Maple Syrup Pie..?

 

Edited by: casablancalover2 on Oct 8, 2012 8:48 PM

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Green bean casserole, I can take it or leave it. Tradition, to me, an Okie, is candied yams, cornbread dressing, mashed potatoes, turkey gravy, homemade rolls, pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and my aunt's lime jello with cottage cheese and pineapple. :)

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Happy Thanksgiving to all Canadians from an ex-Canadian, though Canada says now I am both an American and a Canadian.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}RM, You forgot to mention that the most traditional Canadian Thanksgiving dinner is roast horse, although of late people have been enjoying horse tartare. Simmered in a beer reduction, and served with pate de foie gras from Canada geese.

 

It's funny but I was thinking of doing a gag by mentioning you cooking a traditional Canadian Thanksgiving meal of roast of horse with pate de foie gras on the side and with stuffing made from Timmy's donuts... All smothered in maple syrup gravy. With Timmy's coffee and Timmy's pumpkin spice muffins for dessert.

(BTW, yes there actually is a Maple Syrup Gravy: http://homecooking.about.com/od/condimentrecipes/r/blsauce38.htm)

 

 

 

 

 

Funny coincidence...

 

 

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> {quote:title=filmlover wrote:}{quote}Happy Thanksgiving to all Canadians from an ex-Canadian, though Canada says now I am both an American and a Canadian.

 

Dual citizenship... Nothing wrong with that... Except you have to pay taxes to both, I think???

 

You could renounce your Canadian citizenship, like Conrad Black did (now he wants it back):

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizenship/renounce.asp

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> {quote:title=casablancalover2 wrote:}{quote}Curious...I have read about the turkey. But what about

>

> Green Bean casserole?

>

> Candied Sweet Potatoes?

>

> Pumpkin Pie?

> h5. WAIT! Maybe it's Maple Syrup Pie..?

 

All sounds good to me! I'll eat anything that don't kill ya... Right away, that is...

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}Green bean casserole, I can take it or leave it. Tradition, to me, an Okie, is candied yams, cornbread dressing, mashed potatoes, turkey gravy, homemade rolls, pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and my aunt's lime jello with cottage cheese and pineapple. :)

 

All sounds good. Thought you meant cornbread salad dressing?? Think in Canada we say stuffing...

So it'd be cornbread stuffing...

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It's called both stuffing, and dressing, in the US. I haven't lived in Okla. since I was a kid, but I think most said "dressing" back then. Most people I know, even up here in Michigan, cook some, if not all, of it separately from the bird. My mother never stuffed the bird. That way the bird cooks faster, and there is less risk of food poisoning. If you stuff it, the stuffing must be cooked done enough to kill any bacteria that it might have absorbed from the raw turkey. By that time, the bird itself may be over cooked.

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Food Network food geek Alton Brown and I agree on one thing; Filling the cavity of a turkey with bread is detrimental to sustaining any moisture in the meat. ESPECIALLY cornbread, which sucks up moisture like a shop vac! We usually stuff the bird with orange halves, onions or other fruits and herbs instead.

 

 

 

One holiday peculiarity...nothing to do with Thanksgiving, but rather Easter. Many Americans in the past traditionally celebrated the day noting the ressurection of the "King of the Jews" by sitting down to a huge HAM DINNER!

 

 

 

I could never figure that out...

 

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Edited by: Sepiatone on Oct 9, 2012 3:06 PM

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Indeed, that's another good reason not to stuff the bird. My trick to cook a juicy bird is to cook it right side up, that is with the back up, as when the bird was walking around. That way, the fat in the back runs down into the breast, and bastes it. The breast cooks less than the rest of the bird, because it is sheltered in the baking pan. About half an hour before the bird is done, I flip it breast side up, so that the breast browns.

 

Most often, I do smoked turkey on my 42" kettle grill. When I do that, I cut out the back bone, using poultry shears. Then, I open the bird up, and flatten it out so that the body cavity is down, and the skin side is up. This way, the bird cooks very evenly, and more quickly than when it isn't spread out.

 

I use a baster to put a baste under the skin. I also baste the body cavity. When it is nearly done, I baste the skin, so it browns nicely. I use various bastes, and either hickory, or mesquite, depending on which baste I use.

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}It would be a instant Thanksgiving in Canada if they ended the NHL lockout.

Not if you're a Toronto Maple Leafs or Montreal Habs fan... :_|

 

You can try this quiz out on alleged differences between Canuck and American Thanksgivings re: food:

 

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/entertaining/photo_gallery_quiz__canadian_vs_american_thanksgiving_feasts-1.php

 

Strangely, the quiz above don't give you the answer to the stuffing differences?

 

But you can find it here:

http://www.diffen.com/difference/Thanksgiving_in_America_vs_Thanksgiving_in_Canada

 

The difference in usage between the words stuffing and dressing is here:

http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.ca/2010/12/stuffing-and-dressing.html

 

I think use of the word stuffing is more common in Canadaland...

 

Edited by: RMeingast on Oct 10, 2012 12:49 PM

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I have never made cornbread stuffing for the turkey. Back home, it is dressing, and it is made with white bread mixed with Apple graham bread, with apples,dried chopped onion, celery with leaves, seasoned w/sage and butter.

 

I have tried the cornbread stuffing with sausage, the latest was last year in FL with friends who made it for their Thanksgiving.

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finance wrote: I've always used the term stuffing here in USAland.

----------------------------------------------------------------

 

YEAH! And with all the "fixin's" TOO!!! ;)

 

(...which now begs the question: Do Canucks ever say "fixin's"?)

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Oh, and btw Char...I DO believe you left out the oysters in that there recipe o' yours!

 

(...MMMmmm...I LOVES me that there oyster stuffin', alright!)

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well, in the true center Heartland, in Minnesota, there are very few oysters. But, I did have an aunt who created a wonderful Oyster dressing/casserole (loved the little crushed oyster crackers on top) that was served on Christmas Day. . . Christmas Eve... Swedish 2nd generation, can you imagine how American heartland it really is then.? At least they gave up on the fruit soup, but there was still pickled herring in wine sauce.

 

Still, I am searching for the perfect Maple Syrup Pie recipe.

 

And I always like the idea of roasted corn with the Thanksgiving dinner, since the tradition started with the Natives sharing their harvest with the Pilgrims.

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