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Loretta Young's legacy: Films, sainthood, victimized by Clark Gable

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AndyM108 wrote:

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*If any actress ever aged better (physically) than Loretta Young, I'd like to know who it was.*

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Lena Horne, Ann Rutherford, and June Allyson were at least right up there with Young, Of note, like Young (just not as famously), neither Horne nor Allyson drank or smoked (to my knowledge); I don't know about Rutherford. Those rank among the major causes of aging. As far as I know none of them had plastic surgery (I did not include Lauren Bacall, a heavy smoker whose face became startlingly more youthful in the early to mid 1980s, after a Bogart retrospective marking 25 years since his death).

 

Other actresses had other factors working against them...illness, skin type, etc.

 

Oops. I would also add Katharine Hepburn to that list. Like Allyson, no one was calling her a beauty, but both ladies aged quite well. Keep in mind that Hepburn lived longer than her contemporaries, so looking at her at 90+ isn't a fair comparison.

 

Finally, I would add Frances Dee.

 

BLU

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I'd say Marlene Dietrich gave Loretta a run for the money in the aging dept. but I'm sure both ladies had "help" along the way...........

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Ready to be pummeled with rotten tomatoes . . .

 

 

Never understood what the attraction was. Always thought she was kinda odd looking and entirely lacking in the talent department. Her roles were repeatedly weak feminine archetypes, so maybe I'll never know if she had more to give.

 

 

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No, not from me. I wouldnt say she was a great actress. Competent. A great star and beauty, yes. I'm looking forward to seeing more of her work, as few of her films pop up on TCM and I havent seen a lot of them.

 

 

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Disappointed to see so much negativity and teasing about Loretta Young. For a long time, I could not find much technique in her style of acting. But I have gradually become a fan of hers.

 

The real point is that the lady's a legend. How many other classic actresses can you mention to today's audiences and they will automatically know who she is. Miss Young has attained a rare status.

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Disappointed to see so much negativity and teasing about Loretta Young. For a long time, I could not find much technique in her style of acting. But I have gradually become a fan of hers.

>

> The real point is that the lady's a legend. How many other classic actresses can you mention to today's audiences and they will automatically know who she is. Miss Young has attained a rare status.

Loretta's pre-Code work -- much of it unavailable to casual classic movie fans for decades, since much of it was deemed too racy to show in TV packages of the time -- has led to her career being re-evaluated, favorably. I'm not certain she was a great or elite actress, but her pre-Code oeuvre is pretty solid, and she's almost always at least competent...and considering she didn't turn 21 until just a few months before the end of the pre-Code era, that's saying something. In a way, she was a sort of prodigy, and at the start of 1934, she was certainly a bigger star (and had more of a resume) than Carole Lombard (though she was never in Carole's class as a comedic actress).

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I don't think we need to compare Loretta Young to other actresses of her generation. All we need to do is look at her individual film performances. They speak volumes.

 

The only thing in common between Loretta Young and Carole Lombard is Clark Gable, and that's another story.

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Well I agree with you on Allyson. As for Young, well I used to place in the same category was Allyson, Wyman (of the mid 40s and on), and especially Colbert; They each looked more like my mom's friends instead of my sistert's!

 

But latter one I discovered those Young pre-code movies and her 30s work. A much different Young than the Young of the 40s and 50s and one I now like a lot.

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Are you saying that most twentysomethings have heard of Loretta Young, but not, say, Carole Lombard or Joan Crawford? Where did you get this information?

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Well we need one of those 'man in the street' type of informal polls that I have seen lately related to politics. The last one I saw a few days ago, they were showing people pictures of the VP, Biden. Most people didn't know who he was. A few would say 'the VP' but didn't know his name. They showed these same people a picture of Tom Cruise and they all knew who he was!

 

I have no idea what type of results we would get showing pictures of classic movie actresses to people under 30. My guess is that the most well known stars would be in the order of; Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Bette Davis and maybe Crawford. But in most cases they would just say 'I don't know'. But again, just a very wild guess on my part.

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This came up a few months ago, and several females on these boards said that Audrey Hepburn is surprisingly well-known among twentysomething women because of her connection to fashion.

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It's a shame, isn't it, TopBilled? But not surprising.

 

No matter, Ms. Young had the last laugh. She was an excellent actress and a great beauty.

 

All her detractors can do is type anonymously.

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> {quote:title=Hibi wrote:}{quote}

> No, not from me. I wouldnt say she was a great actress. Competent. A great star and beauty, yes. I'm looking forward to seeing more of her work.

The best post-code performance I've seen her give is in 1946's The Stranger with Orson Welles and Edward G. Robinson. It's the most conventional film Welles ever did, but it's still pretty exciting, compelling and has a great finale. Sadly, it has lapsed into the public domain (it shows from time to time on TCM) and the print and sound quality are not terrific. It'll of course be on as part of the Young tribute in January.

 

It's a tough part and she's good in it, and she and Welles, while oddly juxtaposed, have chemistry.

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All her detractors can do is type anonymously.

 

Pretty much the same thing her supporters (of which I am one) are doing.

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This is good news. She's a personal favorite of mine and there's quite a few films being aired that I've yet to see or haven't seen in many years.

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>The best post-code performance I've seen her give is in 1946's The Stranger with Orson Welles and Edward G. Robinson.

 

THE STRANGER aired a few weeks ago on the Encore Suspense channel, back-to-back with TOUCH OF EVIL (which makes for a great double-feature). The print was in above average condition. This project was a reunion for Young and Robinson who previously worked together on THE HATCHET MAN.

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The best post-code performance I've seen her give is in 1946's The Stranger with Orson Welles and Edward G. Robinson.

 

I may to to agree, but then again, I really love her role as the desperate housewife trying to retrieve a letter in CAUSE FOR ALARM.

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Under what circumstances do films "lapse" into the public domain? What are some well-known films that have? (aside from IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE).

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If I happened to be using my real name on these boards, I would still be a detractor. I guess you are a protractor (I'll bet you got an "A" in Geometry).

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