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SueSueApplegate

December Star of the Month: BARBARA STANWYCK

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Watching Ladies of Leisure Stop Never seen it before Stop What a fantastic print Stop The highest quality Stop Its as if this film has just been made in 1930 Stop Stanwyck is a great natural actress Stop Wonderful experience Stop Sign her up for 7 years Stop Wish you were here Stop

 

Fred

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LADIES OF LEISURE was great, and yes a beautiful print, I too haven;t seen it in awhile. Next up is THIS IS MY AFFAIR, starring Babs and future hubby Robert Taylor. Barbara was borrowed by 20th Century Fox to film this when the originally cast Alice Faye became sick (over the years she lost a number of films due to illness).

 

Later tonight, another film she did at Fox, A MESSAGE TO GARCIA. This one she was offered when new French import Simone Simon reputedly was not up to snuff, altough I think it was her attitude more than her accent.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Dec 5, 2012 9:57 PM

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> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:

> }{quote}LADIES OF LEISURE was great, and yes a beautiful print, I too haven't seen it in awhile.

I hadn't seen it in a while either, and yes it sure was a nice print. I don't think I'd seen a print before that still had the exit music intact, as this one did.

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Babs is a favorite in this household and usually pretty good bait for getting the newbies to watch an old film with me.

 

When I started recording TCM the amount amassed of Stanwyck movies became my first "box set". When listing the movies included, I was amazed at the breadth of her films- short & sassy precodes, 40's farces, crime & dramatic films. And she's GREAT in all of them!

 

As another poster stated, even in the worst films, she elevates the film's shortcomings with her utter conviction. Jeopardy is a family favorite, if only because of it's crazy story line. I LOVE this photo and even made a magnet for the 'fridge from it:

 

th?id=H.4562815158257062&pid=15.1

 

As for comparing her to another big fave Bette Davis....Bette was a B-I-G performer and we all know overly dramatic people like that, it makes them interesting.

But somehow Babs seemed natural in every role, like just any normal person, we identify with her on that level.

Bette evokes our innermost feelings, while Babs is more toned down.

 

And the few times Babs does lose her composure, we're moved because we "feel" it. The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, Clash By Night and Meet John Doe are excellent examples of that.

 

And when Babs has complete command of herself as in Lady Eve, she can be funny without cruelty. She just does it all very well. And always looks great-very contemporary looking woman.

 

There's only a few Stanwyck's this month that are new to me and I'm glad to get them. Looking at the body of work shown this month on TCM, Stanwyck is truly an amazing, accomplished artist.

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We are certainly lucky to be able to see these rare films. TCM is the only channel in the world that tracks them down and shows them.

 

I have been waiting to see A Message to Garcia for 60 years. Way back in 1952, my father told me it was one of his favorite films. We often discussed classic films, since he had been a classic film fan since he was a kid in the 1920s. He was a projectionist's assistant in a silent film theater when he was a kid, and he told me about a lot of old films and about how films were made.

 

At an early age he taught me how to spot model shots and rear screen projection scenes, and how to tell real news and combat footage from staged Hollywood footage. He told me his favorite old film was the silent version of King of Kings, and decades later I finally got to see it on TCM. I've been an H.B Warner fan ever since. He' one of the waxworks in Sunset Boulevard.

 

I saw that film with my father and in 1953 we took a 2,000 mile trip out to Los Angeles and we drove the whole length of Sunset Boulevard. We went on old Route 66, the same highway taken by the Joad family in Grapes of Wrath. We stopped off at the Painted Desert and Petrified Forest in Arizona. We crossed over the Colorado River on the same curved-arch bridge shown in the Wrath movie, the same one the Joads crossed over, and we made the same drive to Needles California.

 

On the way back, we took the Southern Route and we stopped off in Tombstone Arizona where we visited boot hill and the O.K. Corral. We stopped at old El Paso and crossed over into Mexico at Juarez. Then in Texas we stopped to see the original old Jersey Lilly saloon, which was in the movie The Westerner. I was 11 years old, so I've been a classic movie fan for a very long time.

 

A few years earlier, we saw Treasure of the Sierra Madre together, and Intruder in the Dust.

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The original Jersey Lilly, in a surviving photo that I took in Texas during

our family's 1953 trip out west:

 

297uwg.jpg

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Fred,

 

I love your memories and you are a great poster. However, I think the photo is irrelevant to a discussion about Barbara Stanwyck. I am launching my Classic Film Diary thread. I think you should create a similar thread about your own classic film-related experiences. Just a suggestion...

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Sorry about the off topic stuff. My mind started to ramble. Strange that as an old man I can remember more details about what I did and saw in 1953 and even 1948, better than I can remember what happened last week. :)

 

The oldest Barbara Stanwyck movie I remember seeing in a theater was Sorry, Wrong Number from 1948. Those last moments of her life were so frightening.

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*LADIES OF LEISURE was great*

 

*Ladies of Leisure* is one of my favorite Stanwyck films. When talking about this movie critics usually refer to the "major scene" as the one where Stanwyck stays overnight at Graves' apartment, her misunderstanding his intentions when he walks toward her bed (only to put an extra blanket over her)... I love the buildup (from even before the lights are off), Stanwyck's expressive eyes (she is a master at conveying emotion through her eyes), the cinematography with the rain running down the window... a wonderful piece of filmmaking. This was the movie that really launched Stanwyck's career in Hollywood. Thank goodness for Frank Capra - he was willing to give her a chance even after *The Locked Door* (1929).

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote} Well, I like ... Jennifer Jason Leigh, and I never thought that "Word of Mouth" short she did about Barbara Stanwyck was (bad) I didn't really notice if she "narrated in a dry stilted monotone with utterly no inflection, emotion, or interest...". It's true that she sounds fairly low-key in her narration, but so what? You can tell she's a true fan of Stanwyck's.

>

> Jennifer Jason Leigh is one of the best actresses around today.

Seems like she hasn't been in much lately though.

 

I admit I was mean to JJL and I admit that I am not a fan. A critic once said that her approach to acting reminded him of a cocker spaniel that grabs a gym sock and won't let go. *I love that.*

 

Really, I've seen the JJL tribute to Stanwyck a number of times over the past year and, I am telling you, it was a narration job of Lorraine Bracco-esque proportions. She was an automaton: stilted, dry and passionless, ironically describing an actress who built a whole career out of being *everything under the sun but* stilted, dry and/or passionless.

 

I'm fine with- and even enjoy very much- the tributes Streep, Chazz Palminteri(sp?), Kelsey Grammer, Burt Reynolds, Peter O'Toole, Chris Walken, Anthony Hopkins, George Kennedy and everyone else that I can think of have done on behalf of their favorites/costars and I am fine with them airing constantly throughout the years because they are all very inn-teresting and I wish there were more of them.

 

But- can't help it- that JJL always got the eyeroll from me.

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>Sorry about the off topic stuff. My mind started to ramble.

 

No problem. I do wish you would create a separate thread for your recollections, because then it would be easier to find them and read them. You have so many wonderful things to say.

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Yes, whatever happened to JJL? She seemed on the verge of making it big about 10-15 years ago, then sort of slipped into obscurity........I agree her delivery was a bit "dry" for that.......

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>Was LADIES OF LEISURE Capra's first significant talkie?

 

No. But it was Stanwyck's first significant talkie.

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Everyone knocks (oops, bad pun!) the Locked Door, but I saw it once on TCM and didnt think it was that bad.........

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> {quote:title=Hibi wrote:

> }{quote}Everyone knocks (oops, bad pun!) the Locked Door, but I saw it once on TCM and didn't think it was that bad.........

 

I've always enjoyed it too. Also being familiar with the silent version of which it's a remake (THE SIGN ON THE DOOR, 1921 starring Norma Talmadge) it's very interesting to compare the two.

 

TCM has shown THE LOCKED DOOR a few times before, but I don't recall seeing it scheduled for Stanwyck's tribute this month.

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> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote}

>

> ...A film she did at Fox, A MESSAGE TO GARCIA. This one she was offered when new French import Simone Simon reputedly was not up to snuff, altough I think it was her attitude more than her accent.

>

>

>

 

Did anyone else see that one? Surprised at the poor picture quality of the print. Still, I hadn't seen it in many years and was glad to see it again.

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>TCM has shown THE LOCKED DOOR a few times before, but I don't recall seeing it scheduled for Stanwyck's tribute this month.

 

I recorded it in July 2008 when it aired as part of an all-day Stanwyck birthday tribute. I do not recall seeing it on TCM since that time. It certainly isn't one of the best talkies, but it's fun to see her in a very early role.

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I liked THE LOCKED DOOR too. I thought it was really good for a 1929 film, and Rod La Rocque was just great as an old-time cad. The ending was good too.

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Though I thought the ending was a little contrived, and Stanwyck rough around the edges acting-wise, I liked *The Locked Door* better than her follow up movie, *Mexicali Rose* (also 1929). But then came *Ladies of Leisure* and she never looked back. ;) The reviews of "Leisure" at the time were very positive (at least, what I had read...)

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I figured it was a public domain print (I dont know) I wanted to watch it but was too tired (and not enough space on the dvr as usual........)

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Yeah, Rod was a looker. For an early talkie, it was no better or worse than other's I've seen.....

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