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bhryun

Musicals

16 posts in this topic

It's bad enough to have to suffer through a musical, but an entire day of musicals is about all I can take. Come on guys, no one want's to watch musicals all day.

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Have you ever seen "Sound of Music" or "Singin' In the Rain" or "Easter Parade"...sure I admit that I really didn't love musicals when I first saw them but...I watched all the dancing closer and the singing. Like Rita Moreno said dancing is a form of acting by watching how the actor moves in character...and so is singing...some times the character can't express all of his/her feelings in just words alone s/he must belt them out in song and dance. Just watch one of those movies once and you'll see what I'm talking about. Better yet go see "Westside Story" and if you don't like any of those I give up!!!

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TCM does a varity of different theme days to try to please everyone's different tastes. So, if you don't like, don't watch. But, don't try to ruin it for those who like musiclas.

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Speaking of musicals, or at least movie scores, the American Film Institute just announced that they will be having a second "100 Greatest" show this year, in September, to celebrate the 25 greatest movie scores. The ballot includes 250 (vs. the usual 400) nominees:

LOS ANGELES, May 9, 2005?American Film Institute (AFI) today distributed a ballot with 250 nominated movie scores to a jury of over 500 leaders from the creative community, including composers, musicians, film artists (directors, screenwriters, actors, editors and cinematographers), critics and historians. The 25 film scores that receive the most votes will be presented live?and in order?by Principal Conductor John Mauceri and the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra with classic scenes from many of the films projected on the Bowl?s big screens. AFI?s 100 Years of Film Scores will be held one night only at the Hollywood Bowl at 8:00 p.m. on September 23, 2005.

 

The jury has been asked to choose up to 25 movie scores from a comprehensive list, including entries such as ANATOMY OF A MURDER (composer Duke Ellington), BATMAN (composer Danny Elfman), BEN-HUR (composer Miklos Rozsa), BORN FREE (composer John Barry), GLADIATOR (composer Hans Zimmer), THE GREAT ESCAPE (composer Elmer Bernstein), THE PINK PANTHER (composer Henry Mancini), ROCKY (composer Bill Conti), SHAFT (composer Issac Hayes), STAR WARS (composer John Williams), TITANIC (composer James Horner) and RAGTIME (composer Randy Newman).

 

...

 

 

About the Jury Process

 

The jurors have been asked to consider the following criteria in making their selections:

 

FILM SCORE

An original music composition written to serve as the dramatic underscore to an American film released in the sound era.*

 

CREATIVE IMPACT

Film Scores that enrich the moviegoing experience by bringing the emotional elements of a film's story to life.

 

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE Film Scores that create a new sound and, therefore, present the film in a distinct fashion while advancing the art forms.

 

LEGACY

Film Scores that are also enjoyed apart from the movie and evoking the memory of its film source, thus ensuring and enlivening both the music and the movie's historical legacy.

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Speaking of musicals, or at least movie scores, the American Film Institute just announced that they will be having a second "100 Greatest" show this year, in September, to celebrate the 25 greatest movie scores. The ballot includes 250 (vs. the usual 400) nominees:

LOS ANGELES, May 9, 2005?American Film Institute (AFI) today distributed a ballot with 250 nominated movie scores to a jury of over 500 leaders from the creative community, including composers, musicians, film artists (directors, screenwriters, actors, editors and cinematographers), critics and historians. The 25 film scores that receive the most votes will be presented live?and in order?by Principal Conductor John Mauceri and the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra with classic scenes from many of the films projected on the Bowl?s big screens. AFI?s 100 Years of Film Scores will be held one night only at the Hollywood Bowl at 8:00 p.m. on September 23, 2005.

 

The jury has been asked to choose up to 25 movie scores from a comprehensive list, including entries such as ANATOMY OF A MURDER (composer Duke Ellington), BATMAN (composer Danny Elfman), BEN-HUR (composer Miklos Rozsa), BORN FREE (composer John Barry), GLADIATOR (composer Hans Zimmer), THE GREAT ESCAPE (composer Elmer Bernstein), THE PINK PANTHER (composer Henry Mancini), ROCKY (composer Bill Conti), SHAFT (composer Issac Hayes), STAR WARS (composer John Williams), TITANIC (composer James Horner) and RAGTIME (composer Randy Newman).

 

...

 

 

About the Jury Process

 

The jurors have been asked to consider the following criteria in making their selections:

 

FILM SCORE

An original music composition written to serve as the dramatic underscore to an American film released in the sound era.*

 

CREATIVE IMPACT

Film Scores that enrich the moviegoing experience by bringing the emotional elements of a film's story to life.

 

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE Film Scores that create a new sound and, therefore, present the film in a distinct fashion while advancing the art forms.

 

LEGACY

Film Scores that are also enjoyed apart from the movie and evoking the memory of its film source, thus ensuring and enlivening both the music and the movie's historical legacy.

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Given that this one is about Film Scores, it's one that I will definitely be watching. I'm still fuming about last year's AFI 100 Best Songs choices, however! ;)ML

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I find musicals fascinating for the story or plot, incorporating the music and choreography into a great film.

 

Some of the greatest music from the last century came from musicals. In the film "Flying Down to Rio" you have "The Carioca". The title songs from "42nd Street," "Oklahoma," and "Hello Dolly". Judy Garland in the "Harvey Girls" singing "Atchinson Topeka and the Santa Fe". Special mention to Judy singing "The Trolley Song," and "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas." Fred Astaire in "Swing Time" singing "The Way You Look Tonight". Ginger Rodgers singing in Pig Latin "We're In the Money" from "Gold diggers of 1933". Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers singing and dancing to "The Continental" in "The Gay Divorcee". Helen Morgan singing "Bill" and Paul Robeson singing "Ol' Man River" in the 1936 musical "Show Boat". Hollywood's adopted show business anthem from "The Band Wagon," "That's Entertainment". Stubby Kaye singing "Sit Down, You're Rocking the Boat" from "Guys and Dolls". Olivia Newton John and John Travolta singing "You're the One That I Want," and Frankie Valli singing the title tune "Grease".

 

I do not want to disrespect or demean the author of this thread. He or she has the right to their opinion. If you don't like musicals you must not be fond of music. All of this great film-making and great music and you can't find one reason to consider and embrace it? The first three films scheduled in the musical marathon, "The Gay Divorcee," "Top Hat," and "Swing Time", are templates of what great musicals are.

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I don't understand why some of you cannot comprehend. I said an entire day of musicals is too much. This does not mean in any way that I do not like music.

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In case you haven't noticed, TCM spotlights full days of many different genre - horror, drama, comedy, etc, etc...musicals are part of the package. bada-bing

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wa4gil - for one who hates musicals, I find it ironic that four out of your five posts exist, merely to express your distaste for musicals. One note Johnny?

 

Sure they're goofy, sometimes, but...as they say..."That's Entertainment"

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I could not only watch a great Hollywood musical, which is something no other country really made as well, and particularly MGM, but I could watch a whole week of musicals.

 

Gene Kelly, Rita Hayworth, Fred and Ginger or Judy or any of his other partners, Dan Dailey or Bobby Van, with Ann Miller hoofing it, and Mitzi Gaynor or Cyd Charisse in those amazing spectaculars.

 

I particularly like any film directed by Busby Berkeley, or even just dance segments, which are hallucinogenic.

 

Are you now sorry you asked, "who would want to watch a whole day of musicals?"

 

If you want to see just "music" go turn on VH1 and see if Britney sings in the shower in her new reality show.

 

 

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I did'nt use to like musicals either(I hope that made sense excuse my bad grammar) but after watching them more often I really got into them.

Some great ones are

 

West Side Story

Gypsy

Sound of Music

Marry Poppins

Phantom of the Opera

Moulin Rouge

Chicago

Guys and Dolls

Take me out to the BAll Game

Rocky Horror Picture Show

---if you want something really eccentric

.......

 

and many more which I think of at the moment

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Musicals are so much fun. Even though they're sometimes cheesy, they're still fun. The more you watch them, the more you like them. Some of my favorites are:

 

Annie Get Your Gun

Swing Time (and all other Fred and Ginger movies)

Phantom of the Opera

Sound of Music

And many more!

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This holiday weekend a movie theatre in Los Angeles is running a Great American Musicals series -- all double features!!!

 

MY FAIR LADY (1964) and GIGI (1958). Two of my favorites, so this double feature is a must. Haven't seen these two in a theatre for years. This is going to be a long show, but I am looking forward to seeing these two classics again.

 

Others in the series are:

 

A STAR IS BORN (1954) and FUNNY GIRL (1968)

ON THE TOWN (1949) and WEST SIDE STORY (1961)

 

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