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misswonderly3

Film Noir Fridays: Can't Hardly Wait !

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June is a good month for noir lovers, what with TCM's Friday nights with Eddie Muller and a great line-up of noirs.

Yeah, some we've seen many times -but that's because they're so good ! Others are more rare offerings.

Should be good.

 

(ps - I love that expression "Can't hardly wait !" )

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Yep, MissW. I'm lookin' forward to these films, also.

 

However, much like the malapropism of, "I could care less", wouldn't the proper use of the phrase you're attempting to convey here be, "Can(not "can't") hardly wait"?

 

(...sorry, didn't mean to come across like the SprocketMan here!) ;)

 

LOL

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Well, Dargo baby, I'm sure you know that I know the expression is not grammatical. And it would be a lot less fun to use if it was- in fact, it wouldn't exist.

 

"Can't hardly wait" is a more colourful thing to say than the more correct "I can't wait."

I even acknowledged my reason for using the "improper" version on my post.

 

Aint nuthin wrong with a few double negatives now and then. I'm sure some of those shadey film noir characters used them from time to time.

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>Aint nuthin wrong with a few double negatives now and then. I'm sure some of those shady film noir characters used them from time to time.

 

Now what are you talkin' about here, MissW.

 

Why, Dan Duryea ALWAYS sounded just like Professor Henry Higgins in these kind of movies!!!

 

(...good point, actually) ;)

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Count me in too! I hope there will be some stuff I havent seen (not broadcast in the early morning hours) so I can watch

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_Noir Writers:_

 

*June 7th: DASHIELL HAMMETT*

1maltese.png

 

*June 14th: DAVID GOODIS*

1dp.png

 

*June 21st: JONATHAN LATIMER & JAMES M. CAIN*

1they.png1james.png

 

*June 28th: CORNELL WOOLRICH & RAYMOND CHANDLER*

1cornell.png1big.png

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In response to those fabulous noir book covers, noir fans might like to know about a lavish two volume set of books, The Dark Page: The Books That Inspired American Film Noir, and The Dark Page 2, that feature full page (9.5" x 12.5") color scans of hundreds of first edition dust jackets of novels that were later adapted into movies. They're published by Oak Knoll Press and written by Kevin Johnson, a used and rare book dealer in Baltimore who's also a huge fan of our favorite film genre. You have to see these books in order to fully appreciate them, but the link below will give you a taste. They're not cheap, but they're well worth it in the long run.

 

http://www.royalbooks.com/darkpageorder.php

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And Andy, I bet those luscious noir books you're talking about just wouldn't "work" on a kindle. Even if they were available on one.

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Hey, all 3 early movie versions of THE MALTESE FALCON are going to be on tomorrow night, including the awful Bette Davis version with the screenplay all messed up.

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Really? That's great !

Right, I just checked the schedule. I hadn't looked very carefully before, and had taken for granted it was the well-known John Huston version they were showing at 8. But it's the 1931 one, which I've never seen. I doubt it's as good as its 10-years-later counterpart, but I've always wanted to see it. I can watch the 1942 one anytime, I own it.

 

But the other version, the one you said was so bad, 1936, with Bette Davis, isn't on til some ungodly hour like 3 or 4 in the morning. *Satan Met a Lady* .

 

I am a big fan of *The Maltese Falcon*, at least of the one I know so well. Hey, look at my screen name. (Which, by the way, I chose because that name always makes me laugh. It's such an obviously fake name, what was Brigid O'Shaughnessy thinking? Of course, that's a fake name too.)

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In looking over the choices of Herr Muller, I'm not really all that jazzed about anything outside of the alternaversion of The Maltese Falcon we're getting tomorrow night.

 

They Won't Believe Me! is a really cool movie: *very engaging* and features a great (and surprisingly nasty) turn from Robert Young and a young Susan Hayward as a young Susan Hayward (you'll get it when you see it.)

 

Deadline at Dawn is a Clifford Odets joint. I don't care for Clifford, nor would it seem does Muller as he's rather critical of this movie and (the mercifully not included in this festival) Clash By Night in his book Dark City. Will be inn-teresting to see his comments before and after the film.

 

City Streets looks intriguing. Think After the Thin Man is a waste of air space WHY is this on in Prime Time and Satan Met a Lady on at, what? 4:00 am? The Glass Key is always welcome. I'd rather The Burgler was on at 8:00, but I'm inn-terested in it. I *hated* the book Shoot the Piano Player is based on.

 

 

Would've liked to've seen some neo- noirs like The Long Goodbye (1973) and Farewell My Lovely (1975) on the list, heck, I still got a sweet spot for LA Confidential ...and I'm not nuts about the 1991 film adaptation of The Grifters, but if you're doing a festivale du writers du roman noires, you *must mention Thompson* and it would've made a better inclusion than, say, The Postman Always Rings Twice (bitchy eyeroll) again.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 6, 2013 2:33 PM

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Jun 6, 2013 2:35 PM

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Thanks, Andy, for providing that great link.

 

I wanted to be clear about Jonathan Latimer, however. The selections for him-- NOCTURNE and THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME-- are not based on novels, to my knowledge. Latimer wrote the screenplay for NOCTURNE based on an original story by Frank Fenton and Rowland Brown. And he wrote the screenplay for THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME based on an original story by Gordon McDonnell.

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Addison,

 

You're thinking along the same lines I was. TCM seems to be using Muller to trot out a lot of the usual suspects. Muller actually didn't pick the 1941 version of THE MALTESE FALCON. He picked the 1931 version, but TCM is doing an add-on after his selections air.

 

I have been combing through the IMDB for all six of these noir writers. And I am going to profile some of their other films that should have been selected, and probably would have been selected if TCM had allowed Muller to go outside the box more.

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What's not airing this month:

 

*James M. Cain*

 

- WHEN TOMORROW COMES (1939)..with Irene Dunne & Charles Boyer, from Universal

- MONEY AND THE WOMAN (1940)..with Jeffrey Lynn & Brenda Marshall, from Warner Brothers

- MILDRED PIERCE (1945)..with Joan Crawford & Zachary Scott, from Warner Brothers

- SLIGHTLY SCARLET (1956)..with John Payne & Rhonda Fleming, from RKO

- INTERLUDE (1957)..with June Allyson & Rosanno Brazzi, from Universal

 

*Raymond Chandler*

 

- THE FALCON TAKES OVER (1942)..with George Sanders & Lynn Bari, from RKO

- TIME TO KILL (1942)..with Lloyd Nolan & Heather Angel, from 20th Century Fox

- AND NOW TOMORROW (1944)..with Alan Ladd & Loretta Young, from Paramount

- THE UNSEEN (1945)..with Joel McCrea & Gail Russell, from Paramount

- THE BLUE DAHLIA (1946)..with Alan Ladd & Veronica Lake, from Paramount

- THE BRASHER DOUBLOON (1947)..with George Montgomery & Nancy Guild, from 20th Century Fox

 

*Dashiell Hammett*

 

- ROADHOUSE NIGHTS (1930)..with Helen Morgan & Charles Ruggles, from Paramount

- THE THIN MAN (1934)..with William Powell & Myrna Loy, from MGM (includes various sequels)

- WOMAN IN THE DARK (1934)..with Fay Wray & Ralph Bellamy, from RKO

- THE GLASS KEY (1935)..with George Raft & Edward Arnold, from Paramount

 

 

*David Goodis*

 

All of his films are being shown.

 

*Cornell Woolrich*

 

- CONVICTED (1938)..with Charles Quigley & Rita Hayworth, from Columbia

- STREET OF CHANCE (1942)..with Burgess Meredith & Claire Trevor, from Paramount

- PHANTOM LADY (1944)..with Franchot Tone & Ella Raines, from Universal

- THE MARK OF THE WHISTLER (1944)..with Richard Dix & Janis Carter, from Columbia

- BLACK ANGEL (1946)..with Dan Duryea & June Vincent, from Universal

- THE CHASE (1946)..with Robert Cummings & Michele Morgan, from United Artists

- FALL GUY (1947)..with Clifford Penn & Robert Armstrong, from Monogram

- THE GUILTY (1947)..with Bonita Granville & Don Castle, from Monogram

- FEAR IN THE NIGHT (1947)..with Paul Kelly & DeForest Kelly, from Paramount

- THE RETURN OF THE WHISTLER (1948)..with Michael Duane & Lenore Aubert, from Columbia

- I WOULDN'T BE IN YOUR SHOES (1948)..with Don Castle & Elyse Knox, from Monogram

- NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES (1948)..with Edward G. Robinson & Gail Russell, from Paramount

- THE WINDOW (1949)..with Bobby Driscoll & Barbara Hale, from RKO

- NO MAN OF HER OWN (1950)..with Barbara Stanwyck & John Lund, from Paramount

- REAR WINDOW (1954)..with James Stewart & Grace Kelly, from Paramount

- OBSESSION (1954)..with Michele Morgan & Raf Vallone

- NIGHTMARE (1956)..with Edward G. Robinson & Kevin McCarthy, from United Artists

 

*Jonathan Latimer*

 

- THE WESTLAND CASE (1937)..with Preston Foster & Frank Jenks, from Universal

- THE LADY IN THE MORGUE (1938)..with Preston Foster & Patricia Ellis, from Universal

- THE LAST WARNING (1938)..with Preston Foster & Frank Jenks, from Universal

- THE LONE WOLF SPY HUNT (1939)..with Warren William & Ida Lupino, from Columbia

- PHANTOM RAIDERS (1940)..with Walter Pidgeon & Donald Meek, from MGM

- TOPPER RETURNS (1941)..with Joan Blondell & Roland Young, from United Artists

- NIGHT IN NEW ORLEANS (1942)..with Preston Foster & Patricia Morison, from Paramount

- THE BIG CLOCK (1948)..with Ray Milland & Charles Laughton, from Paramount

- BEYOND GLORY (1948)..with Alan Ladd & Donna Reed, from Paramount

- SEALED VERDICT (1948)..with Ray Milland & Florence Marly, from Paramount

- ALIAS NICK BEAL (1949)..with Ray Milland & Audrey Totter, from Paramount

- PLUNDER OF THE SUN (1953)..with Glenn Ford & Diana Lynn, from Warner Brothers

- THE UNHOLY WIFE (1957)..with Diana Dors & Rod Steiger, from RKO

- THE WHOLE TRUTH (1958)..with Stewart Granger & Donna Reed, from Columbia

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What's the problem with When Tomorrow Comes playing on TCM? I've been wanting to see that film for decades! I dont think it's ever been shown.Gag. I just see the problem. It's Universal. I was thinking it was Columbia. Sad.

 

Edited by: Hibi on Jun 6, 2013 3:47 PM

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When I got my first look at the June schedule a few months back (thanks, Calvin ;) ), I was puzzled by why City Streets and the earlier Falcon incarnations were being included in a noir feature, but upon realizing that it was a spotlight on writers whose works inspired famous noirs, it made sense. And I will take any excuse, as flimsy as you please, to see Sylvia Sidney show up on TCM! :)

 

Having said that, it would've been a treat to have the 30s version of The Glass Key accompanying the Ladd-Lake version. Has anybody around here seen this one?

 

Loved the book covers, TopBilled!

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If given free hand in picking out titles for a ferstivale du filme noir I'd like to see No Man of Her Own (1950), Crime Wave, Desert Fury, The Sniper (which might not be too PC, but I really want to check it out), The Damned Don't Cry!, The Sea Wolf (maybe a stretch, but I see it as noir ), The Breaking Point, The Accused (1949), Odd Man Out, Detour, Stranger on the Third Floor (more for historical perspective than anything else), The Long Goodbye (1973), Farewell My Lovely (1975), The Friends of Eddie Coyle

 

...and I'm tempted to label Hangover Square a+ noir it deserves to be aired so highly.+

 

Some of these aren't as good, of course, as Ye Standardes, but aren't we all a leetle tired of Out of the Past by now?

 

ps- Out of the Past is not included in the June Spotlight

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Yeah, and as far as I know it's never been shown on TCM! :(

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}

> ...and I'm tempted to label Hangover Square a+ noir it deserves to be aired so highly.+

It's always a debate as to what "counts" as noir, but I think Hangover Square can fit the bill. Despite the Victorian setting, it's a dark tale - both visually and thematically. And what a memorable swan song (sadly) for the great Laird Cregar.

 

For what it's worth, *They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?* included the film among their "250 Quintessential Film Noirs":

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/noir250noirs2.htm

 

Reign of Terror aka The Black Book is another great example of a period-piece noir (at least to my satisfaction). French Revolution, in its case. Amazing cinematography in that one!

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> I am a big fan of *The Maltese Falcon*, at least of the one I know so well. Hey, look at my screen name. (Which, by the way, I chose because that name always makes me laugh. It's such an obviously fake name, what was Brigid O'Shaughnessy thinking? Of course, that's a fake name too.)

I love your screen name, too. But cut poor Brigid a little slack - she's under a lot of pressure. And at least she didn't tell Spade and Archer she was "Iva Fakename". ;)

 

*"{font:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif}{size:small}We, we didn't exactly believe your story, Miss, uh...What is your name, Wonderly or Leblanc?...We didn't exactly believe your story, Miss O'Shaughnessy; we believed your two hundred dollars...I mean, you paid us more than if you'd been telling us the truth, and enough more to make it all right."{font}*

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Nowadays I only watch film noirs if they are official Eddie Muller

Certified Film Noirs ©. Accept no substitutes.

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