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misswonderly3

Film Noir Fridays: Can't Hardly Wait !

313 posts in this topic

Mr. Muller, it's been a really fun ride this month watching those film noirs, along with your pungent comments both before and after each film. In particular, I'd like to thank you and TCM for introducing me to The Burglar, which I had never seen before.

 

I'm glad to see that you, too, admire Dick Powell's work (I'm talking, in particular, about his post-Murder My Sweet career, of course) and it's great to hear that TCM will be showing Pitfall in September. It's a noir everyone should see. The only regret I have about Powell as Marlowe was that scene in his undershirt, as someone earlier pointed out on his thread. (Perhaps that's the reason why Warners didn't show Bogart in his undershirt when he played Marlowe - the visually underwhelming result would have been much the same, I suspect).

 

Your suggestion of William Holden as Marlowe is an excellent one. Aside from Holden's impressive physique and line delivery, not a lot of actors were more successful at portraying cynicism than the Bill Holden of the '50s.

 

 

You mentioned Powell as an underrated talent, which is true, as a combination of actor, singer, producer, director, television pioneer. But when it comes to underrated screen Marlowes, what about James Garner? Yes, the film itself was a modern update and people tend to remember Bruce Lee chopping up his furniture. But Garner himself had the physique (every bit as much as Holden, perhaps moreso), plus the cynical attitude and an incredible line delivery that I think matched that of Dick Powell.

 

 

One more thing, Mr. Muller, you've been a class act for coming on these boards and sharing your opinions with us here. I want to put in a special thanks for that.

 

 

It is my sincere hope that we will see you on the channel again soon. You've been a great host. Your love and knowledge of all things noir is apparent to all.

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*clore wrote:* {font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*OK, Payne had to leave the studio to make a change in his image, just as Powell had to do earlier. Funny, both those two started at Warners as light leading men in musical comedy and they wanted to stretch into tough guys while the biggest attraction at Warners, James Cagney, wanted to be a song and dance man.*

 

That is an ironic observation, clore. But it's a reflection of the straight jacket frustration that so many actors (and actresses) felt about stereotyping. The thing is, when both Powell and Payne did get the opportunity to play tough guys they were very convincing in their roles. (Truth is, I would never have guessed that would be the case based on their earlier musical film work).

 

Powell's films today are better known than Payne's noirish efforts. Powell was great, as we know, at the smart patter. Few actors could deliver a cynical zinger quite like Dick Powell. Even in a lesser effort like Johnny O'Clock, it's a pleasure for me to watch him.

 

But John Payne was a far more physically imposing tough guy in a film like Kansas City Confidential or, especially, 99 River Street. When Powell took a sock at Mike Mazurki in Murder My Sweet I thought, "What ARE you doing?" If the tough guy Payne of the '50s had done it, well, he looked like he could have at least made Mazurki sweat a little in a physical altercation. {font}

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> {quote:title=TomJH wrote:}{quote}Mr. Muller, it's been a really fun ride this month watching those film noirs, along with your pungent comments both before and after each film. In particular, I'd like to thank you and TCM for introducing me to The Burglar, which I had never seen before.

>

>

> One more thing, Mr. Muller, you've been a class act for coming on these boards and sharing your opinions with us here. I want to put in a special thanks for that.

>

>

> It is my sincere hope that we will see you on the channel again soon. You've been a great host. Your love and knowledge of all things noir is apparent to all.

>

BOOM! I totally agree with Tom's comments here! Your presence both on the channel and here on the boards not only gave this entire Spotlight feature a sense of gravitas, but also provided me with a feeling that we're all here together, enjoying and discussing these flix! It was really a class act, as Tom mentioned, for you to participate in Miss Wonderly's awesome thread, and we can only hope that you'll return for more flix to present and share together on TCM sometime soon!

 

Wish you the best, Mr Muller! You totally rock!

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Yes, I think Holden would have likely made a fairly good Marlowe. Joe Gillis

from Sunset Boulevard is already partly there with his cynical, sarcastic

attitude within and without his narrative. The physical presence and looks

and age would be about right too. I suppose Holden had so many first rate

film roles offered to him during the 1950s, maybe a detective movie wouldn't

have been of much interest, but it sure would have been interesting to see.

 

 

Too bad that Bob Mitchum was closing in on 60 when he played Marlowe. What

would it have been like if he did it in his prime? I don't mind it all that much that

the movies usually keep the brainy aspects of Marlowe out of sight. But it's

an intriguing aspect of the books that he plays chess and drops the offhand literary

allusion. Not your typical private dick.

 

 

 

 

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Has TCM ever shown the Mitchum remake? If they have, wish they would again (in primetime) Wasnt the Anne Shirley character dropped in the remake? Was she in the book?

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Well if Bill can narrate a movie post-mortem, maybe he can do this too.

Holden as Marlowe would have been an interesting proposition, one

we'll just never get to see.

 

I saw the two Mitchum films (Bob being the only actor to play the character

twice in the movies) many moons ago and would love to see them again.

Unfortunately, they're not on YT--yet. :D

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I actually saw the remake (Farewell, My Lovely) before I saw the original. But I havent seen it since it was released, so I dont remember too much about it. The Big Sleep remake (set in London of all places) I never saw. Cant believe that one is too good, as it flopped.....

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No, The Big Sleep was not as good as Farewell, My Lovely imo, though

it did have the scene of Candy Clark trying to seduce Bob. A little weird.

Dreary old London just doesn't present the contrast with the underlying

corruption as well as sunny LA does. I think Sleep was a British production,

so I guess they figured they'd shot it there. Didn't really work.

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I thought 20,000 Years in Tarrytown was the Van Winkle pic, and that

The Big Sleep was the alternative title for Abbott and Costello Meet

Doris Day.

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