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misswonderly3

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I don't know if you watch the sitcom "How I Met Your Mother" or not MissW, but there's an ongoing running gag on that show that Canadians are "overly polite", and of which actual Canadian actress Cobie Smulders(and FINE lookin' young lady she is indeed) who plays the character of Canadian Robin Scherbatsky is often kidded about this by the other characters on the show.

 

There was one episode I remember where she took the other regular characters to a "Canadian" bar in NYC, and she kept trying to start a fight with the other patrons at that bar and just to prove to her friends that that stereotype was wrong. But, every time she tried to insult one of the patrons, all they did was apologize to her!

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Hi,

 

Well, I am Canadian; I live in Calgary, Alberta, which is the most American! city in Canada because of the oil industry here.

It is also the most conservative city in Canada and is in the heart of 'red-neck' country...

 

Mostly, we are polite and well mannered but there are definitely very rude, coughing, sneezing individuals here too... The finger is given and "a-s-s-h-o-l-e" is readily heard here too....

 

I have travelled many times to the US and Europe and Asia and have been treated very well - I wear a small maple leaf pin on my shirt or lapel and it seems to get me treated nicely!!!

 

Techno-nerds (geeks) are ever present here too; and giving up one's seat on public transit or refraining from loud talking in theaters is absent here also.

 

It's all called "modern civilization", I guess????

 

Larry

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I meant funny as in their almost total lack of common sense and intelligence

is very humorous. There are a number of sites on the net that will support that

thesis.

 

I think if one went back and viewed Firing Line episodes from the very turbulent

mid and late 1960s period, Buckley may have won the arguments intellectually,

but lost them emotionally, since that period was a very emotional one in political

terms. That's more of a general impression, since I haven't seen too many FLs from

that period, and of course don't remember in detail the ones I did see.

 

The founding fathers were mostly of the gentlemanly sort who were concerned with

manners, George Washington being the prime example. He kept a notebook full of

the do's and dont's of polite society and was extremely punctilious in following them.

He was so thorough in this that the whole thing is rather humorous, though not to him.

 

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Hello, vecchiolarry ! and Greetings to a fellow Canadian. Funny, judging by the number of posts you've racked up, and your registration date here, you've been around quite a while. Must be in some of the other forums..."Say, stranger, I don't know as I recall seein' your face around these here parts before..."

 

Anyway, yes, the maple leaf pin always helps when travelling. B-)

 

 

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What does "prominently" Canadian mean? That it is mentioned that he is Canadian? If it's not mentioned, how would we know? Because he says "Eh?"

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>Anyway, yes, the maple leaf pin always helps when travelling.

 

Reminds me of the cartoon I saw in some newspaper right after the election of 2008.

 

It showed a "superhero" type dude takin' off his outfit with a big ol' Maple Leaf on the front of it and about to don an outfit with the Stars and Stripes on it.

 

And of course the caption read: "Well thank God I don't have to travel the world telling everybody I'm 'Captain Canada' anymore!'

 

(...though I'm pretty sure I've mentioned this in the past to ya, haven't I, MissW) ;)

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Who said "prominently Canadian" ? Not me, and not Vecchiolarry. I can't see any mention of that phrase, at least not on this page of this particular thread.

 

But, since I am good-mannered ( :| ), I will attempt to answer your question.

I suppose "prominently Canadian" would be similar to being "prominently American". Unless we're talking about George Brent, in which case we know exactly what we mean by "prominent".

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OK, I went back and saw that. But maybe you should have addressed your question to SansFin, rather than me.

I think she just meant "noticeably", as in, the movie goes out of its way to identify the character as Canadian.

There are no George Brent equivalents in Canada. "Only in the U.S. you say? ...Pity."

(I don't expect you to get that.)

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Hello Misswonderly,

 

A hearty Calgarian "Howdie" to you, fellow Canadian!!!

 

I posted on this board quite awhile ago, but vacated when it erupted into a mud-slinging fest some years ago.

I sometimes come back here to lurk now....

 

Mostly, I post on Silver Screen Oasis now...

 

Larry

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>Hello Misswonderly,A hearty Calgarian "Howdie" to you, fellow Canadian!!! I posted on this board quite awhile ago, but vacated when it erupted into a mud-slinging fest some years ago.I sometimes come back here to lurk now....Mostly, I post on Silver Screen Oasis now.. Larry

 

Ummm...I take it this "Silver Screen Oasis" must be headquartered somewhere north of the 49th, and where people act more civilized, huh?...err...EH?! ;)

 

LOL

 

(...this Yank is just pullin' your leg here, Larry...just in case ya might think I'm bein' serious here)

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

> OK, I went back and saw that. But maybe you should have addressed your question to SansFin, rather than me.

> I think she just meant "noticeably", as in, the movie goes out of its way to identify the character as Canadian.

 

That was my meaning. I am very sorry for the contretemps caused by my poor English.

 

I know of movies wherein a character's nationality is important to the story.

 

I am at a loss to remember one in which the character being Canadian was a significant factor.

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Heck Sans, I just kinda sorta mentioned one...

 

"49th Parallel" !

 

(...LOVE it when Raymond Massey kicks the ever-lovin' shi...err..MAPLE LEAFS outta Eric Portman over Niagra at the end of that baby...LOVE it!!!!)

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}

> "49th Parallel" !

 

That movie is set in Canada and the movies which misswonderly kindly listed have characters who are identified as Canadian but I do not see in any of them that a character's: "Canadian-ness" is an issue or used either as a part of the plot or as a stereotype in the same way as a sneaky Japanese or humble Chinese or militaristic German or a Belgian being a Belgian.

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OH, I see now...sorry.

 

(...I still like it when Massey puts the hurt on Portman, though!) ;)

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}What is "Canadian-ness"?

In Scotland, they call in Loch-ness !! ;)

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>What is "Canadian-ness"?

 

Well, here's been my little "theory" on THAT, Fred...and since I've spent some time in all the countries I'm about to mention.

 

Canada is basically "America-LITE", such as Sweden is basically "Germany-lite".

 

You see, you have four very industrious countries here with very similar cultural mindsets correlative to their continent. BUT, the two country located north of the U.S. and Germany are just somehow a little easier going and a little less "intense" and cocksure of themselves...and something that's quite refreshing to experience to some of us overly competitive Yanks.

 

(...well, at least to THIS Yank, anyway...and primarily of course during ANY time BUT the WINTER months!!!!) ;)

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>>I previously wrote:

>>it is almost as if you were Canadian...

>

>SansFin replied -I am very sorry to have taken so long to reply but I have been trying very hard to work out if you meant that as a compliment or as a tongue-in-cheek insult.

 

I most certainly mean Canadians are civil, friendly, and polite-but not in an passive/aggressive and arrogant way like some folks around in these parts-- because of that, I can understand your subtle confusion.

 

I hope the Canadians don't mind me saying this, but there is so much more to gain in loving your country when you don't seem to have to prove to the rest of the world. If a country's population could be condensed to a family, clearly the Canadians would appear to be quite normal to outsiders, while the United States can appear very dysfunctional.

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Thanks Darg and dark, I think you are both right, and that is probably why Canadians don't get "stereotyped" in movies. The only stereotyping I can recall comes from the old Canadian Western movies, with the Mounties in red coats.

 

Films like:

 

Northwest Territory (1951)

 

Border Saddlemates (1952)

 

North West Mounted Police (1940)

 

North of the Border (1946)

 

Perils of the Wilderness (1956)

 

Northwest Trail (1945)

 

Jaws of Justice (1933)

 

The Code of the Scarlet (1928)

 

In Line of Duty (1931)

 

North of the Rockies (1942)

 

His Fighting Blood (1935)

 

Trails of the Wild (1935)

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There is an episode of the tv show House. A patient is brought in to the hospital, wounded, but he's incredibly, unnaturally cheerful and keeps smiling, despite his injury. His wife tells Dr. House he's always like that. Dr. House says he's either crazy or Canadian. Turns out he has some brain disease.

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>What - no mention of 'Rose Marie' (1936)?

 

Northern Pursuit (1943)

 

The 39 Steps hero is a Canadian

 

There are too many to mention, and difficult to remember, since the characters have no well known stereotype characteristics. Sort of like American mid-westerners in old American movies.

 

IMDB lists 1,392 films that are listed under the keyword "Canada"

 

http://www.imdb.com/keyword/canada/

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