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Dothery

SCARAMOUCHE

74 posts in this topic

granger4.jpg

(Just to keep things on-topic.)

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Well ya KNOW MissW, you COULD have kind of just split the difference here and posted a pic of THESE Rockers if ya wanted to do THAT...

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQVghVNRiMWlUEU1z7A_-V

 

(...I mean, don't YOU..ahem.."do the Fandango"???)

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Eeh! You've been THIS way since I've METCHA, lady!!!

 

(...don't you go tryin' to blame this on ME, now!!!)

 

LOL

 

;)

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True, I do have criticisms of Robert Osborne's "wraparounds", but as Tom said, that should be reserved perhaps for a thread dedicated to that topic.

Dotherty, as the original poster, you may be feeling disappointed. Sorry.

 

 

Not at all! At the risk of being thought a renegade, I enjoy it when the threads go here and there. I learn a lot and I like to watch discussions. I hope that isn't being too much of a rule-buster. I'm still a fairly recent entry in the movies stakes here.

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I think I'll drag the thread off course just a little bit here to insert a thought about actors who comment on their own roles, and the terrible consequences that can have. When I was in my romantic early 20's, a wonderful movie called "Madonna of the Seven Moons" came out of the J. Arthur Rank shop (at least I think it was a Rank picture, no pun intended, I'm sure). We were insane about it, a girlfriend and I. We went to see it in D.C. at the Little Theater, which showed foreign films. Oh, how we mooned over Stewart and Phyllis Calvert, who played the woman with the multiple selves. One of the first pictures ever to imply that you could have what they then called a "split personality." In one part of her life she was a pure and deeply religious matron, living in a mansion in Rome, beautiful, married happily to a wonderful man who adored her, and with a grown daughter, equally lovely but of course a young spirited type. Then suddenly something would trigger the other personality, and she would turn into a gypsy, a thief, a gorgeous and amoral creature, who would return to Florence and resume her bohemian life with Granger, who had no idea where she'd been and was afraid to ask, because she'd fly off the handle and threaten to leave if he did.

 

Well! What a movie! I loved it to death. Years and years I remembered the love scenes and the wild craving Granger and his gypsy love had for each other. I finally found it on tape and bought it and ran it again and again. Heaven. Sheer heaven.

 

And then one night I saw him in a documentary, talking about the "pot-boiler" movies he'd made for Rank. And he said he was a good actor. A very good actor, because he never liked Phyllis. "Too much the STAR," he said. Here I'd been drooling over them in "Madonna" and "The Man In Grey," the other romp, this time Regency, with James Mason as the aristocratic cad who pretty much "buys" Phyllis to perpetuate what Granger calls "his rotten line," and then treats her indifferently until she steps out of line with Stewart ... and all the time he was holding in his contempt for poor Phyllis. Who probably never knew it.

 

It's a tribute to his magnetism that I can still like him in "Scaramouche" after his crumbling my illusions to pieces like that. But I still do.

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Boy, things were really hoppin' on these boards last night, on ALL these discussion threads. A locked thread and everything. Must have been a slow TV night, on TCM and elsewhere. No NBA fans out there?

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Hello Dothery. I too went to the Little theatre in D.C. back in the 40s and 50s to see foreign films.It was the only place to see them. Do you remember the Earle Theatre? Then is was sold to Warners and the sign as put up in two parts so that the first day it read WAR!

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This was pointed out earlier, but Eleanor Parker did not like Stwewart Granger. A few years ago, she did a rare radio interiview with a show hosted by Dick Dinman. She spoke, in no uncertain terms, about her dislike for him. You can google Dick DInman and bet you will find it. He also had a longer interview with her regards Interrupted Melody. It's all actually quite funny.

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Wow. She must've really disliked him to be still talking about it. Wonder why?

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>Boy, things were really hoppin' on these boards last night, on ALL these discussion threads. A locked thread and everything. Must have been a slow TV night, on TCM and elsewhere. No NBA fans out there?

 

Yeah! As a matter o' fact I'M a NBA fan myself, finance!

 

AND, with 20 seconds to go in last night's game, I was yellin' at the TV set, "FOUL HIM, and DON'T let them get off a three-point shot in order to tie the game!" FOUL HIM!!!!"

 

(...and IF Popovich would've had his team do THAT, then the Spurs would be the NBA Champs this morning!!!)

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>Wow. She must've really disliked him to be still talking about it. Wonder why?

 

Well Hibi, maybe because of what I said much earlier in this thread when Tom first brought up the apparent dislike Eleanor had for Granger...

 

"I always DID get the impression(maybe from seeing him on talk shows years after his career was in decline) that Granger in real life thought his "you-know-what didn't emit any aroma", and so that's probably why Eleanor didn't care for the guy."

 

(...though once again this was only a guess on my part)

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I listened to this Radio link someone once sent me on Dick Dinman interviewing Eleanor Parker and he asked her who her favorite leading man was and her least favorite. She said Robert Taylor was her favorite and thinks because of his looks he was underrated. She also denied ever having an affair with him, but admitted he wanted to date her at some point after Above & Beyond, but she was engaged to her third husband. Her least favorite was Stewart Granger...... she claims it was because of the scene where she had to slap him and he warned her to hold back on the slap and threatened he would choke her (I am not making this up). After the slap, he turned away and never spoke to her again. Several times she says he was nasty and just not a nice person.

 

 

 

In the final portion of the interview, DIck Diman plays the interview "from the late Stewart Granger" who was his first interview on this show. He asks him about what Eleanor Parker said and he says it was indeed over the slap and that she was a feisty one who maybe had issues with me in those tights..... (or something like that).

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jun 19, 2013 10:01 PM

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So many behind-the-scenes tales of bad feeling - it's kind of disillusioning, but of course, that's life, as Frank Sinatra sings.

I remember another story about an over-enthusiastic slap, in fact I read about it here on these message boards. Can't remember the details, I think it involved Bette Davis.

 

Since we were speaking of Eleanor Parker here, I want to say again that I have completely changed my mind about her. I knew little of her work, and was judging it based mostly on *Between Two Worlds* and *The Man with the Golden Arm.* In both pictures, but particularly the latter, she plays a whiney anxious clinging woman. Of course, that is just a testiment (or is it "testimony"?) to her acting ability; silly of me to think that's what Miss Parker herself was always like.

 

 

So, I realized she was way more versatile than that when I saw *Caged* last week. And now, this week, with *Scaramouche*, I have actually become an Eleanor Parker fan. She is so much fun in this movie; I'll just be repeating what others have said on this thread, but I feel the need to say it myself, perhaps to absolve my former anti-Eleanor malfeasance.

She was delightful to watch in *Scaramouche,* high-spirited, funny, and lovely.And she imbued her character with a complexity beyond the dialogue. I loved it that, unpredictably, she accepted that the man she loved married another, she was even friends with the lady. Of course, that' s the character, not Eleanor, but she did a fine job getting that across.

It looked like she had a great time banging those pots and pans about. Too bad Granger didn't think so too.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jun 19, 2013 6:34 PM

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>I remember another story about an over-enthusiastic slap, in fact I read about it here on these message boards. Can't remember the details, I think it involved Bette Davis.

 

You're probably talkin' about this one here, MissW...

 

 

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Great post, Miss W. You've already thanked me for the alert about *Scaramouche* and was willing to find out why I like Eleanor so much. What I want to say to you is, that's what I find so great about your posts. You changed your mind, you were open to changing your mind and admitting it. You allowed yourself to be open. That to me is one of the TRUE marks of intelligence. Nothing hidden with you, you are an honest, upfront person and I admire that very much.

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I've heard that there are certain rare people that are genetically predisposed to have their excrement smell like lilacs. Maybe Granger was one of these, so his attitude may have been justified.

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Hmmm...I thought the only person like THAT was that character Joel Cairo in that movie about some bird statue we were all talkin' about recently!

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lavender: As our friend SansFin would say, "I thank you for the kind words." I do try to keep an open mind; think of all the interesting things we'd miss out on if we weren't willing to change our minds now and then.

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Thank you Miss Wonderly......that really is a very sweet Post and I appreciate your taking the time to write me in such a heartfelt way. But believe me, no absolution necessary, although I am St Bart's and for a very brief time thought of entering the priesthood, but alas, I was only 10 years old.and afterward found wicked, wicked ways. However, so happy to hear you have been converted, and to think, there are several others following your Fold according to the Posts.

 

 

You need to see the other Oscar nominated performance, The Detective Story. It is quite good, William Wyler, a bit dated, but good actors, story line, makes me think Hill Street Blues took notes. But having said that, you might think for awhile Miz P is a bit "whiney, anxious & clinging" in this one, but hang in there...... it's also a terrific transformation of character.

 

 

 

 

Enjoy next Monday, I know I am......

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jun 19, 2013 9:53 PM

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Yeah, that is very possible that's the one. Fun to watch. Ms Parker says in that interview, "she knew how to slap for the movies and you have to watch their eyes", etc. Well, it is really only her side, but Granger did not have a lot to say when questioned. It's all fun and guess why we all love "old" movies.

 

Edited by: StBartsActor on Jun 19, 2013 10:10 PM

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