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HoldenIsHere

PSYCHO

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"Bates Motel" is a first-rate series - dark, brooding and haunting.

 

It has an exceptional cast, too.

 

I really responded last night to Norma's fidelity to her son - and her overwhelming need to protect him.

 

The bed scene in which Norman decides to kill his mother was almost unbearable to watch.

 

But, in killing her, was he protecting her - or himself?

Matricide, eh?

 

I knew someone who thought that word meant "killing one's mama on her bed's mattress".

 

Admittedly, even Eddie Gein had that overly close relationship with mama, and Bates Hotels does that type of abnormal relationship a good turn fictionally.

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It's interesting.

 

But nothing is as interesting as the true life of Eddie Gein.

 

I mean, who uses skulls to eat soup from or makes masks of woman's faces and wears them at night while singing and dancing under the moonlight?

 

If you want those aspects of Gein, you can watch any of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre series. The character of Leatherface wears masks made from women's faces, and he dances under the moonlight. He and his family also use furniture and other items made from bones and skin, a la Gein.

 

Gein's "flesh suits" also inspired the Buffalo Bill character in Silence of the Lambs.

 

Deranged (1974) was a more thinly disguised version of the Gein story.

 

And then, of course, there's Ed Gein (2001) starring Steve Railsback as the title fella.

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Since nobody has mentioned his name, Sherrif Alex Romero was heartbreaking in the last scene. Nestor Carbonell who plays Alex was in the cast of LOST which I never watched. Carlton Cruse one of the creates of THE BATES MOTEL was also involved with LOST.

 

Nestor Carbonell is very good in Bates Motel. I liked him on Lost as the never-aging Richard Alpert. He was previously known mostly as a sitcom actor, having been in the casts of Suddenly Susan and The Tick. He's shown quite a range.

 

nestor-carbonell-2.jpg

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Since THE BATES MOTEL began on A&E four  years, I haven`t missed a episode. Vera Farmiga is a actress that I really like. Films that I have seen her in are THE DEPARTED, UP IN THE AIR, THE CONJURING Part !, and THE JUDGE. Freddie has the stare of Norman Bates, which helped him get the part. Norma and Norman are excellent as mother and son. I will be crushed if Norma is dead in the last episode.

 

Norma`s son Dylan has always impressed me. He can tough and gentle with conviction. Since nobody has mentioned his name, Sherrif Alex Romero was heartbreaking in the last scene. Nestor Carbonell who plays Alex was in the cast of LOST which I never watched. Carlton Cruse one of the creates of THE BATES MOTEL was also involved with LOST.

 

I am happy that the show will return for a fifth season, but Norma will definitely be missed if she doesn`t awaken next Monday. Vera will be on the screen in THE CONJURING 2 in late June.

 

Yes, Vera Farmiga is one of my favorite actors.

Even if Norma is dead at least Vera Farmiga  will continue on BATES MOTEL as "Mother," Norman's alter.

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If you want those aspects of Gein, you can watch any of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre series. The character of Leatherface wears masks made from women's faces, and he dances under the moonlight. He and his family also use furniture and other items made from bones and skin, a la Gein.

 

Gein's "flesh suits" also inspired the Buffalo Bill character in Silence of the Lambs.

 

Deranged (1974) was a more thinly disguised version of the Gein story.

 

And then, of course, there's Ed Gein (2001) starring Steve Railsback as the title fella.

Ya know, Lawrence I own both the "Deranged" film and the "Ed Gein" one and I really think both are great.

 

But no one film can totally explain the strangeness of Eddie, what with his offing local women and also digging up recently buried ones and scavengering body parts for his collection of lips and other things, and it takes both Leatherface and Norman to show even some of his demented deeds on film.

 

What was the old Plainfield joke at the time of the killings? "Why did Eddie Gein not go to his high school prom?"

 

"Cuz he couldn't dig up a date!"

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Nestor Carbonell is very good in Bates Motel. I liked him on Lost as the never-aging Richard Alpert. He was previously known mostly as a sitcom actor, having been in the casts of Suddenly Susan and The Tick. He's shown quite a range.

 

nestor-carbonell-2.jpg

Thanks for the photo of Nestor. He speaks Spanish, and for many years he played Hispanic roles. A very good looking and reliable actor too.Now I am sorry that I didn`t watch LOST when ABC had the show on their network.

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Since we're on the subject of Psycho..

 

Is General Hux ever one. :wacko:

 

tumblr_o0nbgqr5D01rxm9ewo2_540.gif

 

I'm not sure if General Hux was a psycho, but Snoke certainly played Hux and Kylo Ren against each other.

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Thanks for the photo of Nestor. He speaks Spanish, and for many years he played Hispanic roles. A very good looking and reliable actor too.Now I am sorry that I didn`t watch LOST when ABC had the show on their network.

 

Nestor was featured on the T.V. show Psych as a partner of Juliet, the leading female character, in 2 episodes.

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That's not interesting; it's just sick.

I just read a book written by an FBI profiler who talks about this very thing, Holden.

 

He believes that by not seeing serial killers as people but designating them as monsters who are sick, we negate what they are really doing and create legends of them as iconic murdering stars, similar to Freddie Kreuger or Leatherface.

 

This is why I say what Gein did is "interesting" in an abnormal psychology way. To call him "sick" though true in some context, only makes his actions seem as if he is not responsible for them because he has a mental illness causing him to kill, and as most know the majority of serial killers are not insane in an legal way.

 

The book I read made me think more about not labelling serial killer types as "sick" as that is too easy a tag to use to explain their crimes.

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I just read a book written by an FBI profiler who talks about this very thing, Holden.

 

He believes that by not seeing serial killers as people but designating them as monsters who are sick, we negate what they are really doing and create legends of them as iconic murdering stars, similar to Freddie Kreuger or Leatherface.

 

I agree with this. Starting in the mid-80's or so, there was a serial killer fixation in film, television and print that went way out of control. Bundy, Henry Lee Lucas, Ed Gein, John Wayne Gacy, Jeffrey Dahmer, etc were all household names, just as much as Freddy or Jason. There were even trading cards, like baseball cards, but of serial killers The whole thing kind of peaked with Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs being a serial killer you could root for. We still have a cultural fascination with them; just look at hit TV shows like Criminal Minds, or the successful ID: Investigation Discovery channel, which has the quaint nickname of the "Murder Channel".

 

If you do any serious reading about these people, you learn that for the most part they are a sad, pathetic bunch, riddled with crippling mental illness and most possessing below average intelligence. The myth of the hyper-genius serial killer is just that, a myth. 

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I just read a book written by an FBI profiler who talks about this very thing, Holden.

 

He believes that by not seeing serial killers as people but designating them as monsters who are sick, we negate what they are really doing and create legends of them as iconic murdering stars, similar to Freddie Kreuger or Leatherface.

 

 

 

I agree with this. Starting in the mid-80's or so, there was a serial killer fixation in film, television and print that went way out of control. Bundy, Henry Lee Lucas, Ed Gein, John Wayne Gacy, Jeffrey Dahmer, etc were all household names, just as much as Freddy or Jason. There were even trading cards, like baseball cards, but of serial killers The whole thing kind of peaked with Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs being a serial killer you could root for. We still have a cultural fascination with them; just look at hit TV shows like Criminal Minds, or the successful ID: Investigation Discovery channel, which has the quaint nickname of the "Murder Channel".

 

If you do any serious reading about these people, you learn that for the most part they are a sad, pathetic bunch, riddled with crippling mental illness and most possessing below average intelligence. The myth of the hyper-genius serial killer is just that, a myth. 

 

 

It seems that you actually disagree with CaveGirl's statement since you comment that these killers are in fact mentally sick.

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It seems that you actually disagree with CaveGirl's statement since you comment that these killers are in fact mentally sick.

 

Sorry, I should have clarified. There's a difference between Hollywood-"glamorous" psychoses, such as that of Hannibal Lecter and The Joker in Batman movies, and the true bed-wetting, crying-yourself-to-sleep, drooling mental illness of most real-world serial killers. Ted Bundy was an exception, and there are a couple of others, but none are brilliant polymaths who drop zingy one-liners while they hack away at their victims.

 

To bring it back to the thread topic, I think the show Bates Motel has done a brilliant job of showing Norman as a realistic mental case and not a stereo-typically "cool" movie or TV psychopath. I think Vera Farmiga is also great at showing the fragile mental case that Norma is, too. (You know Norma could use some meds!)

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Sorry, I should have clarified. There's a difference between Hollywood-"glamorous" psychoses, such as that of Hannibal Lecter and The Joker in Batman movies, and the true bed-wetting, crying-yourself-to-sleep, drooling mental illness of most real-world serial killers. Ted Bundy was an exception, and there are a couple of others, but none are brilliant polymaths who drop zingy one-liners while they hack away at their victims.

 

To bring it back to the thread topic, I think the show Bates Motel has done a brilliant job of showing Norman as a realistic mental case and not a stereo-typically "cool" movie or TV psychopath. I think Vera Farmiga is also great at showing the fragile mental case that Norma is, too. (You know Norma could use some meds!)

Lawrence, I've read many books on serial killers, mostly to protect myself by knowing the signs of one, and the majority have one thing in common.

 

They often have been abused as children or have some kind of serious head injury to the frontal lobe.

 

Of course we all know the triad of signs to watch for in childhood, like pyromania, enuresis and cruelty to animals.

 

One wonders if such signs were noticed early enough if the makings of a serial killer would be abrogated?

 

Problem is, often if there is abuse in the home, such signs would never be noticed by a complicit parental figure anyway.

 

As you and the book stated, most serial killers are of average intelligence and not super monsters of any kind.

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To bring it back to the thread topic, I think the show Bates Motel has done a brilliant job of showing Norman as a realistic mental case and not a stereo-typically "cool" movie or TV psychopath. I think Vera Farmiga is also great at showing the fragile mental case that Norma is, too. (You know Norma could use some meds!)

 

I agree. I love the way that BATES MOTEL has slowly revealed the details of Norman's dissociative identity disorder to the audience and also the fragility of Norma's psychological state as more and more of her past traumas become known. 

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I love the way that BATES MOTEL has slowly revealed the details

 

Wish I could have gotten "into" it. In the first episode, when Mrs Bates decided to cover up the killing and not report it to the police, it completely lost me. That, and the cel phones just confused me. Very well acted and photographed, though.

 

And I don't feel the need for any elaboration on this story-Hitchcock brilliantly covered Norman's issues, his mother's issues well enough in the original movie.

It seems like the entire series is "fleshing out" what Hitchcock revealed succinctly in a couple of sentences.

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I love the way that BATES MOTEL has slowly revealed the details

 

Wish I could have gotten "into" it. In the first episode, when Mrs Bates decided to cover up the killing and not report it to the police, it completely lost me. That, and the cel phones just confused me. Very well acted and photographed, though.

 

And I don't feel the need for any elaboration on this story-Hitchcock brilliantly covered Norman's issues, his mother's issues well enough in the original movie.

It seems like the entire series is "fleshing out" what Hitchcock revealed succinctly in a couple of sentences.

 

BATES MOTEL is a prequel to the events of PSYCHO that's set in the modern day, hence the cell phones and the internet. 

 

The Hitchcock movie didn't reveal much about the real Norma Bates. We only saw Norman's alter "Mother," which was a persona that his mind created and not the real Norma. The psychiatrist at the end of PSYCHO even states that "Mother" was jealous of Norman's attraction to other women because Norman (the host personality) was jealous of his mother's relationships with other men. 

In other words, the "Mother" we see in PSYCHO is a version that has been filtered by Norman rather than the real Norma Bates.

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The worlds of PSYCHO and BATES MOTEL collided in last night's episode of series with Marion Crane's stay at the motel, an episode aptly called "Marion."

The final season is the first to begin with Norma Bates already dead so Vera Farmiga has only appeared as Norman's alter "Mother."

Early episodes of the season introduced Sam Loomis (and his wife) into the story, and with the episode focusing Marion the series is approaching its climax.

I loved all the references to the famous shower scene from the original Hitchcock movie and what a wonderful twist to murder.

 

Favorite line:

NORMAN: Mother, what have I done?  

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