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JewelsCJohnson

Silent Movies

15 posts in this topic

Are there really that many people who want to watch silent movies? I'm getting SO tired of all the silent movies that I guess it's time to quit TCM. I LOVE old movies but only back as far as the talkies. The silent films I'm sure have redeeming traits if you listen to Drew Barrymore; but I'm certainly sick of them. There are a remarkable number of old movies that are great to watch. Silent movies are none of those.

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Jewels,

 

Watch the King Vidor's THE BIG PARADE on the 25th in Prime-time and you will be pursued to love Silent film. Or even record THE CROWD tonight and you will be blown away. Easily two of the greatest films ever made! Earlier TCM finally aired the Cohen Restoration of THE THIEF OF BAGDAD with the magnificent Carl Davis score and it is pure magic. That beign said, THE BIG PARAE and THE CROWD are two vastly superior films in my opinion, because the translate better without having to see then on the big screen than the Fairbanks film does.

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>>>There are a remarkable number of old movies that are great to watch. Silent movies are none of those.

 

If you can't enjoy Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd, I feel very sorry for you.

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Are there really that many people who want to watch silent movies? I'm getting SO tired of all the silent movies that I guess it's time to quit TCM.

 

As Nancy Wilson once said, "Don't let the back door hit ya where the dog should've bit ya." Maybe you should just create your own movie channel so you'll never be "forced" to watch something you don't like.

 

Sorry to be so blunt, but these complaints about silents and foreign movies are getting more than a little tiresome. In case people haven't figured it out by now, TCM was never meant to be the home of just one narrow range of movies, and thank God for that.

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I'm watching Vampyr (1932), which is virtually a silent film. The double exposures and camera angles alone are fascinating. This is one of those films that executes the telling of the story very well, as opposed to many older silents which, cosmographically speaking, were a bit less congruous in some areas.

 

There are some silent jewels, but you'll never have the pleasure if you've tyranically dismissed them, maintaining a unilaterally biased view of early films.

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I opened this thread only in hopes that some person had taken their disdain to a higher level and might now be claiming that they are allergic to silent movies and so TCM is creating a health risk by airing them.

 

It is sad to see that it is only yet another unimaginative tirade.

 

One of my favorite movies of all time is a silent foreign movie.

 

I feel burnt-out on Lloyd and Chaplin but I hope that viewers who have not before experienced them will discover the great joy I once had when watching them.

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Silent movies CAN get tiresome after a while, I agree. But they shouldn't be totally dismissed. If you're a "movie buff", then they ARE an important factor.

 

But Jewels' is not an unusual opinion. I've found that many people I know who CLAIM to be "music lovers" only like a particular genre, and nothing more.

 

I SAY, one CAN'T be a TRUE music lover, and dismiss Beethoven or Mozart. Same principle with silent movies.

 

Sepiatone

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When silent movies were made the world was free. alot of countries made great pictures of their history told in their own style. all that was needed was to alter the language of the titles. in 1930 all that changed. Movies stopped being free. The hollywood studios were mini prisons of mass production. The only free period of movie making was before 1930.

Its common knowledge.

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The amazing and silent "The Passion of Joan of Arc" is the most powerful and emotionally evocative movie/film I have ever seen. The music score and the visual power of the eyes and facial expressions and postures are just stunning. This was the second time I had seen it and I was even more impressed than the first time. Did you watch it JewelsCJohnson? Simply an achievement for all time. So many great silents.

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One time the Passion of Joan was playing in L.A. and it had a live orchestra from Scandinavia with a score expressly made for the movie.

I went & the music was psycho type music (if you want to call it that)

I was abused by the catholic church as a child & in those days they operated with impunity. They had giant churches attached to a school thru a doorway so they could compel you thru the door and make you

take part in stations of the cross. It seemed like 2 hours of this and the absurdity made you crack jokes. Altho what happened to Joan was serious business, the church lost all credibility by resorting to such low levels. After my 9 year ordeal of abuse from age 6-15 and severe loss of self esteem the entire school/church was torn down. To cover their tracks.

They ruined the lives of hundreds of students thru their special kind of abuse. It was the same as Joan but you had to go on living after it.

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I'm just more than a little puzzled at the OP when she/he states that "if you listen to Drew Barrymore" you might be convinced of the "redeeming traits" of silent films. Now, I'll admit I haven't seen all her Essentials intros, but is that one of her things? That she can't stop talking about the virtue of silent films? Somehow I doubt that's the case.

 

Edited by: helenbaby on Sep 12, 2013 7:35 AM

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Sometimes I like to watch certain silent movies just to see the cinematography and the camera work. I'm thinking of all the interesting camera angles of "The Passion of Joan of Arc" (and the "disturbing" scenes like the turning wheel in the torture chamber), the lushness of certain scenes in "Sunrise", etc. Without spoken word you have to concentrate a lot harder to follow the movie, but then it draws you in (at least, if it's good) and you start to notice a lot more - an actor's facial expressions, the other aspects that help you to understand the plot.

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I mentioned something like that in another thread, Euginia. That what many silent filmakers accomplished with limited technology was simply amazing.

 

And "amazing" isn't a word I bandy about easily.

 

Sepiatone

 

Edited by: Sepiatone on Sep 12, 2013 12:02 PM

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