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Kid Dabb

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

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This is without a doubt the best horror movie ever made. Now that's just my humble opinion, but that's how I feel about it. The whole zombies-stormin'-the-house segment seen from the inside gets me every time. This starts as a trickle and slowly, very elegantly, builds to a climax.. and then the hero takes one in the head! I mean, dang! It's like, "Yay, we won!!" - BOOM! The whole time the zombies are tearing through the blockades, piece by piece, arms and hands wriggling, searching, grasping, and clawing for any piece of live flesh. Then, at the same time, the survivors are being attacked from the inside - from below. When the idiot's wife (the brunette) gets pulled through the doorway, and the original victim peers through, his sister, frozen with fear and disbelief, succumbs, then... the girl from the basement. All beautifully escalated havoc - what a climax.

 

Every time I see this film I actually find myself squirming out of fear.

 

I know everyone else will have their 'best ever..' but this one is mine. All mine..

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Romero's masterpiece is one of the best horror films ever made-there is something disturbing about the reality of the setting and the action. The ghouls ( not zombies) are scary because they are so normal looking until they start devouring human flesh- which even in black and white looks truly horrifying. The film is also very daring not just because of the black hero. The scene that always gets to me is the little girl munching on her father and then killing her mother ( a brilliant homage to Hitchcock's "Psycho)

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I also like the ending. There is a bit of a release as this may well just be a local phenomenon; not so widespread as it would seem.

 

I can really feel the intensity of being holed up inside that house as, inch by inch, ground is lost to the ghouls. At this point I believe the whole world is affected but the release comes with the onsite interviews inferring this may.. may just be local - and cleaned up by nightfall. Whew! :)

 

And I too thought first of Psycho when the little girl repeatedly stabbed her mother with the trowel - blood splashing and squirting about the walls.

 

And this is just beautiful - poor Barbara

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It is indeed an excellent film and one of my very favorites. I've lost track of how many times I've seen it. It has all the earmarks of a truly great film. Every time I watch it I know how it is going to end and yet I still hope it won't end like it does. It pulls me in everytime. What a punch to the gut that ending is ... just brilliant. The film is an exercise in unrelenting tension and horror and you start to believe that our hero will prevail. Ahhh, but not so fast. Romero has one more trick up his sleeve ... a film that dared to not have a happy ending.

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The homage to *Psycho* escaped me, but I'll watch for it the next time I see the picture.

 

And there is some humor, too: the opening scene, and later, when a law officer is asked whether the ghouls are moving slowly, he says:

 

"Yes, very slowly -- they're dead."

 

This line is echoed in *The Fugitive.* When someone protests that Kimble is dead, Gerard says:

 

"Then he should be easy to catch."

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Certainly one of the best. Also one of the first horror movies I saw also. I credit this and 1956's Invasion of the Body Snatchers for my lifelong love of Horror / Sci-Fi.

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Which version has the last survivor, a woman, realise she can just strong arm and out moneuver the ghouls and just walks through the mob and away ending the movie?

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In the 1990 remake I know the female lead lives. I struggle to remember the rest of that one however. Possible that's the one you're thinking of.

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Chaney, yes, the 1990 remake has that ending. Romero's commentary is excellent - after having the other film mistakenly absconded into "public domain" thru a film-printing error, Romero remade the 1990 with a goal of helping the original film's crew. I like the 1990 version, but the 1968 is still my favorite of the lot.

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This movie started it all for me. I am now a Romero nerd. But when my parents took me to the drive-inn to see this when I was only 10, I hated them until I was an adult. The nightmares this gave me. Now the series is a part of my life

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9 hours ago, harleydude666 said:

This movie started it all for me. I am now a Romero nerd. But when my parents took me to the drive-inn to see this when I was only 10, I hated them until I was an adult. The nightmares this gave me. Now the series is a part of my life

It's not a movie for 10 year old- but my parents took me to see some terrifying movies too like Disney's "Pinocchio"

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1 hour ago, jaragon said:

It's not a movie for 10 year old- but my parents took me to see some terrifying movies too like Disney's "Pinocchio"

Ha, I remember I begged my parents to take me to see Pinocchio, back around 1970 or 71

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I first saw "Pinocchio" when I was around five and the the scene in which the boys are turned into donkeys scared the crap out of me.

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the basement where a writhing, hideous, constantly-hungry 'land octopus' is kept as a pet by mad scientist Bela Lugosi (1955's 'Bride of the Monster') was an image that haunted me as a lad

any basement which has a steel hatch with a round handle to crank open the entryway (like one finds in a submarine), is bad news

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10 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

the basement where a writhing, hideous, constantly-hungry 'land octopus' is kept as a pet by mad scientist Bela Lugosi (1955's 'Bride of the Monster') was an image that haunted me as a lad

any basement which has a steel hatch with a round handle to crank open the entryway (like one finds in a submarine), is bad news

Don't go in the basement in a horror movie- ever!

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jaragon, you seem to be the #1 horror aficionado around here. I wonder if we could get up an in-depth discussion of horror storytelling sometime. Do you ever have any ideas along these lines? Would anyone be keen on it? Would anyone else join in?

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