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UNIVERSAL VAULT

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Looks live Universal is gong ahead and releasing more in their series of new-to-DVD :

 

*Flesh and Fantasy* (1943) - Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, Charles Boyer, Robert Cummings, Thomas Mitchell, Betty Field

*For Love or Money* (1963) - Kirk Douglas, Mitzi Gaynor, Gig Young, Thelma Ritter

*Little Man, What Now?* (1934) - Margaret Sullavan, Douglass Montgomery

*The Thing That Couldn't Die (*1958) - William Reynolds

*You Never Can Tell* (1951) - Dick Powell, Peggy Dow, Joyce Holden

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That's good news - another pre-code era film from Universal Vault, this one a Universal film; and on the heels of two recent Paramount precode releases.

 

The TCM/Universal partnership has brought us quite a few such rarities thus far, but now it seems like they're finally getting serious about their own MOD program, eyeing the revenue potential of under-utilized properties - maybe hoping to duplicate Warner Archive's success.

Thanks TCM for leading the way on this.

 

Not surprisingly there's someone new running home entertainment, streaming, etc.

 

Universal Studios Home Entertainment president Craig Kornblau has been given additional responsibilities that puts him in charge of all physical and digital sales, marketing and distribution operations for film and television.

 

More details @ http://www.homemediamagazine.com/universal/universal-realigns-home-entertainment-31416

 

In related news I read earlier this month that:

 

Universal Studios Home Entertainment has signed on with Allied Vaughn?s manufacturing-on-demand (MOD) DVD service to distribute titles through online retailers, the companies announced.

 

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/universal/universal-signs-allied-vaughn-31560

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A definite improvement in shipping times from them with Allied Vaughn. Little Man, What Now? shipped a whole lot quicker than Tillie and Gus and This Day and Age did recently. Anxious to see if they'll announce any pre-codes slated for November.

 

Edited by: farnsbarns on Nov 1, 2013 1:36 AM

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 EIGHT NEW RELEASES ALL WORTHWHILE

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 EIGHT NEW RELEASES ALL WORTHWHILE

 

The only place I can find these discs is Amazon, and they want almost retail price for them. I've never seen them on sale like the Fox and Warner discs. So far I've only picked up two because of this - last year I got "You Can Never Tell" and I just bought "If I Were King". If these discs were to go on sale for say 10-11 dollars each I'd pick up more, and I think so would a lot of people.

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The only place I can find these discs is Amazon, and they want almost retail price for them. I've never seen them on sale like the Fox and Warner discs. So far I've only picked up two because of this - last year I got "You Can Never Tell" and I just bought "If I Were King". If these discs were to go on sale for say 10-11 dollars each I'd pick up more, and I think so would a lot of people.

 

Calvin,

 

I am not sure how Amazon prices these DVD's.   But MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER is now selling for $15.99 on Amazon so they do lower from time  to time you just have to keep checking.  I put my wants in my cart and wait for the prices to change and then order. 

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15 NEW TITLES:

 

 

•Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949) - Yvonne De Carlo, Howard Duff

•Frenchman's Creek (1944) - Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cordova

•Frontier Gal (1945) - Yvonne De Carlo, Rod Cameron, Andy Devine

•The Great Imposter (1961) - Tony Curtis, Karl Malden, Edmond O'Brien

•Gypsy Wildcat (1944) - Maria Montez, Jon Hall, Nigel Bruce

•Jungle Woman (1944) - Acquanetta, Evelyn Ankers

•The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1935) - Claude Rains, Douglass Montgomery

•The Mystery of Marie Roget (1942) - Patric Knowles, Maria Montez

•River Lady (1948) - Yvonne De Carlo, Dan Duryea

•Romanoff and Juliet (1961) - Peter Ustinov, Sandra Dee

•The Secret of the Blue Room (1933) - Lionel Atwill, Gloria Stuart

•Skylark (1941) - Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland, Brian Aherne

•Son of Ali Baba (1952) - Tony Curtis, Piper Laurie

•Supernatural (1933) - Carole Lombard, Alan Dinehart

•The Truth About Spring (1965) - Hayley Mills, John Mills

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I just discovered that "Against All Flags" was released on DVD a couple weeks ago.  This is very exciting.  Previously, it was only available as part of a box set of Pirate films.  After seeing the premiere of "Against All Flags" back in June during the pirate movie showcase, I wanted to get my own copy.  Mainly because of my #1 guy, Errol Flynn; but I enjoyed Maureen O'Hara as well and liked them as an onscreen team.  It's too bad that they weren't able to make more films together.

 

Anyway, I got a copy of the film via Netflix and burned a copy of the DVD.  Unfortunately, whatever format the film is in, works on DVD/Blu Ray players; but isn't compatible with the DVD players on gaming consoles like XBOX 360 or Playstation 3 and 4, which are what I mainly watch my movies on. 

 

While perusing the latest in Errol Flynn on Amazon, I happened to come across this and was excited to see it.  Can't wait to see what classics will come out next! I have to have something to satiate my classic film thirst while Dish and Turner are feuding.

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I just got White Woman. Universal did themselves proud with the print quality of this Paramount pre-code jungle potboiler.

 

Carole Lombard, playing the title character singing in a sleazy Malayan cafe, is a sister in spirit to Dietrich's lost soul in Morocco. In desperation because she's an outcast and has just been fired, she marries plantation boss "King of the River" Charles Laughton, and travels through a head hunters jungle to his "kingdom." There Laughton manipulates and rules over men who are weak and hiding from their pasts, with nowhere to go.

 

This film was made the year before Lombard's career took a comedic turn with 20th Century. She's beautiful, sleek, always dressed in white, it seems, and without a trace of humour to her disillusioned character. Which is a contrast to Laughton, who plays his essentially repellant character, decked out in a bushy walrus moustache and a Cockney accent that comes and goes, with a jaunty air much of the time. It's a broad, uneven performance, far from Laughton at his best, but there's a decidedly creepy quality to him, even when playing it as a bit of a clown, that makes the character interesting.

 

The "natives" in this film (and they do get restless, too, in the true tradition of movie melodrama) look to be anything but Malayan. You can even cite Noble Johnson among them, the same year he played the native king in King Kong.

 

White Woman isn't a good film, but old movie buffs who love their pre-code black and white films with a steamy quality (and this one literally is steamy with its jungle setting) will probably still get a kick out of it. I know I did. A minor effort, but the Universal Vault print does shine. The black and white photography is lovely, and the jungle setting seems authentic.

 

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UNIVERSAL is finally back with three new titles in their Vault Series

 

All three are great films. Very pleased to see the original version of A PLACE IN THE SUN getting its well-deserved release on home video.

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Her Jungle Love (1938) - Dorothy LamourRay Milland

 

Is this JUNGLE PRINCESS? Or maybe a sequel? Same stars but I can't imagine another movie as fun as JUNGLE PRINCESS.

No, it's a different film even though it has the same two stars and comedy character support (Lynne Overman). The chief difference between the two films is that Her Junge Love was lensed in Technicolor, while Jungle Princess is a black and white affair. I suspect that's the reason it's only the colour one that has made it as part of the Universal Vault Collection (so far).

 

Ray gets to teach Dottie was "kiss" means, Lynne spends a lot of time hanging out with a chimp, and J. Carol Naish, an educated native with a hatred for all whites, arrives on their little island paradise with his crocodile worshipping followers with the intention of throwing a few people to the critters.

 

I purchased the Universal Vault DVD, a nice enough looking colour print of a silly tropical time waster. This kind of undemanding escapist fluff is a bit of a guilty pleasure for me, though I would never try to make a case that it is actually a good film. If you've seen one of these kinds of Lamour sarong "epics" I think you've seen them all.

 

 

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I exclude, of course, John Ford's splendid The Hurricane from that generalization. Ford, photographer Bert Glennon, a superior cast and the sweepingly romantic musical score of Alfred Newman did bring a bit of poetry, I think, to the South Seas genre with that memorable production (not to mention one of the best special effects sequences ever captured on film).

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