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jellygirl0272

Trivia

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9 hours ago, starliteyes said:

I think I would have been stumped for a while on this one if it weren't for the fact that The Letter was on today (not that I had a chance to watch it), but it triggered my memory.

The actress was Bette Davis, the director was William Wyler and the movie was the aforementioned The Letter (another one of my favorites).  The line in contention was "With all my heart, I still love the man I killed!"

Correct Star. Wyler wanted Bette to deliver the line looking at Herbert Marshall in the eye when she said the line, Bette disagreed, feeling that the shame of telling him she didn't love him but still loved the man she killed would prevent the character from looking at her husband when she said it. In the end, as we know, Wyler won out.

Good work, you're up Star :)

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The bronze sculpture of the female star of this movie was actually made by the male star, who was an accomplished sculptor.

Name the movie and the two stars.

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On 3/2/2018 at 11:07 PM, starliteyes said:

The bronze sculpture of the female star of this movie was actually made by the male star, who was an accomplished sculptor.

Name the movie and the two stars.

Phantom of the Opera (1943) Nelson Eddy sculpted Susanna Foster.

01442f2c1b225cc15f178741b2932594--phanto

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Next: This director made one of the most successful movies using a new technique at the time. The odd thing was that he was physically incapable of enjoying this technique.

Name the director, the movie, the technique, and why he would seem to be a poor choice of director.

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59 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Next: This director made one of the most successful movies using a new technique at the time. The odd thing was that he was physically incapable of enjoying this technique.

Name the director, the movie, the technique, and why he would seem to be a poor choice of director.

 Raoul Walsh introduced the 70mm widescreen in 1930 with The Big Trail starring John Wayne.

Due to an automobile accident,  Walsh only had one eye, so it may have been difficult for him personally to take advantage of that widescreen viewing.

( Lawrence, thanks for the hint.)

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21 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Raoul Walsh introduced the 70mm widescreen in 1930 with The Big Trail starring John Wayne.

Due to an automobile accident,  Walsh only had one eye, so it may have been difficult for him personally to take advantage of that widescreen viewing.

( Lawrence, thanks for the hint.)

Nice guess, but incorrect! I will say that my current avatar pick of Raoul Walsh was the inspiration, but the answer is actually a different director, and a different technique.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

Nice guess, but incorrect! I will say that my current avatar pick of Raoul Walsh was the inspiration, but the answer is actually a different director, and a different technique.

But Does this answer your criteria in general for the question?

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Just now, Princess of Tap said:

But Does this answer your criteria in general for the question?

Not really, since Walsh would still be able to see the 70mm image if he sat back far enough. The director in question was totally incapable of enjoying the technique in question.

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My first thought to answer this question was Bwana Devil in 3D.

 So I went back to that with Raoul Walsh and it would be Gun Fury, 1953,  in 3D starring Rock Hudson and Donna Reed.

 I'm going to stick with Walsh because I think you need two eyes to see 3D.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

My first thought to answer this question was Bwana Devil in 3D.

 So I went back to that with Raoul Walsh and it would be Gun Fury, 1953,  in 3D starring Rock Hudson and Donna Reed.

 I'm going to stick with Walsh because I think you need two eyes to see 3D.

I'll give it to you this time, Princess, since it meets the criteria. However, the director I was thinking of was Andre de Toth, who helmed the biggest 3D hit of the 1950's, House of Wax. Mr. de Toth was also missing an eye, and therefore could not see the 3D effects. House of Wax  was the first major studio 3D film shot in color and it was one of the first with stereophonic sound. It was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2014.

Here's a publicity still with de Toth and stars Phyllis Kirk and Vincent Price "enjoying" the 3D effects.

houseofwax-06.jpg

Your thread, Princess!

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26 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I'll give it to you this time, Princess, since it meets the criteria. However, the director I was thinking of was Andre de Toth, who helmed the biggest 3D hit of the 1950's, House of Wax. Mr. de Toth was also missing an eye, and therefore could not see the 3D effects. House of Wax  was the first major studio 3D film shot in color and it was one of the first with stereophonic sound. It was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2014.

Here's a publicity still with de Toth and stars Phyllis Kirk and Vincent Price "enjoying" the 3D effects.

houseofwax-06.jpg

Your thread, Princess!

Lawrence, great question. But next time go ahead and keep it for another day because it was a real Stumper.

And I'm old enough to remember 3D comic books. They were real gas. I don't know why they didn't catch on.

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24 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

And I'm old enough to remember 3D comic books. They were real gas. I don't know why they didn't catch on.

I remember those too. They did not catch on for me for the same reason the movies did not -the glasses drove me batty.

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This classic film director shows up once in a blue moon, but he has influenced the direction of Cinema  many times.

His Classic Hollywood output is so much smaller than other great directors that it's hard to believe that he has the reputation that he has--but he does.

He helped to set the standards for Hollywood in more than one genre: the musical, the horror film and prestigious literary adaptations.

 Ironically he was also a groundbreaking pioneer In modern  staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater.

When you identify this director, please also give a film example from each genre mentioned above and name one of his legendary Broadway musicals.

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On 3/8/2018 at 7:25 PM, Princess of Tap said:

This classic film director shows up once in a blue moon, but he has influenced the direction of Cinema  many times.

His Classic Hollywood output is so much smaller than other great directors that it's hard to believe that he has the reputation that he has--but he does.

He helped to set the standards for Hollywood in more than one genre: the musical, the horror film and prestigious literary adaptations.

 Ironically he was also a groundbreaking pioneer In modern  staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater.

When you identify this director, please also give a film example from each genre mentioned above and name one of his legendary Broadway musicals.

Hint#1: This director was foreign born.

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On 3/8/2018 at 7:25 PM, Princess of Tap said:

This classic film director shows up once in a blue moon, but he has influenced the direction of Cinema  many times.

His Classic Hollywood output is so much smaller than other great directors that it's hard to believe that he has the reputation that he has--but he does.

He helped to set the standards for Hollywood in more than one genre: the musical, the horror film and prestigious literary adaptations.

 Ironically he was also a groundbreaking pioneer In modern  staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater.

When you identify this director, please also give a film example from each genre mentioned above and name one of his legendary Broadway musicals.

 

On 3/10/2018 at 1:13 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#1: This director was foreign born.

Hint#2-- This director's most famous classic movie had an " old school " special effect which the director never divulged until after he had retired from Motion Pictures.

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15 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 

Hint#2-- This director's most famous classic movie had an " old school " special effect which the director never divulged until after he had retired from Motion Pictures.

Sounds like it's probably James Whale? Frankenstein, Bride of FrankensteinThe Invisible Man, Showboat was the musical and the literary adaptation you might be asking about would be The Man In The Iron Mask ????

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On 3/8/2018 at 7:25 PM, Princess of Tap said:

This classic film director shows up once in a blue moon, but he has influenced the direction of Cinema  many times.

His Classic Hollywood output is so much smaller than other great directors that it's hard to believe that he has the reputation that he has--but he does.

He helped to set the standards for Hollywood in more than one genre: the musical, the horror film and prestigious literary adaptations.

 Ironically he was also a groundbreaking pioneer In modern  staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater.

When you identify this director, please also give a film example from each genre mentioned above and name one of his legendary Broadway musicals.

No, if you review the original question, you will notice that it talks about:

" he was also a groundbreaking Pioneer in modern staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater".

So James Whale does not fit that criteria.

 Plus the 30's standards  for the  first Golden Age musicals were set before 1936.... Which will take us to the next * hint.

 

*Hint#3-- This director's groundbreaking Musical Predates both Busby Berkeley and Fred Astaire musicals.

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On 3/8/2018 at 8:25 PM, Princess of Tap said:

This classic film director shows up once in a blue moon, but he has influenced the direction of Cinema  many times.

His Classic Hollywood output is so much smaller than other great directors that it's hard to believe that he has the reputation that he has--but he does.

He helped to set the standards for Hollywood in more than one genre: the musical, the horror film and prestigious literary adaptations.

 Ironically he was also a groundbreaking pioneer In modern  staging techniques of the Broadway musical theater.

When you identify this director, please also give a film example from each genre mentioned above and name one of his legendary Broadway musicals.

OK, if Whale didn't pan out then my next guess would then be Rouben Mamoulian.  The filmDr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Fredric March  and he did Porgy (as in Gershwin's Porgy and Bess) on Broadway ???
 

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7 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

OK, if Whale didn't pan out then my next guess would then be Rouben Mamoulian.  The filmDr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Fredric March  and he did Porky (as in Gershwin's Porky and Bess) on Broadway ???
 

Your guess does pan out because Mamoulian was the original director of Oklahoma!, Carousel and Porgy and Bess.

Mamoulian's  groundbreaking musical was the 1929 Applause starring singer Helen Morgan,  shot on location in New York-- decades before On the Town.

Aside from Dr. Jekyll and and Mr. Hyde, Mamoulian also adapted for the screen  Becky Sharp, Golden Boy and the Mark of Zorro.

Only in 1969 did Mamoulian reveal his special effects secret for transforming Fredric March in the 1931 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

And  Mamoulian is one of the few revered Golden Age directors who directed fewer than 20 movies.

 

Lav, You're right on Target and up again!

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