tommyphils31

What film or scene never fails to choke you up and why?

85 posts in this topic

I could probably list several right away, but maybe one at a time may be best for now. It seems like the list gets larger as the years move forward and I turn into a sentimental old cuss, but here's a start:

 

Film: "Yankee Doodle Dandy"

Scene: Walter Huston's death scene

Why?: My own father's gone, and I miss him more as I age. Plus, Jimmy Cagney cries so convincingly.

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"To Kill A Mockingbird." Atticus is telling Scout about the pearls that are to be hers someday. It's a sweet moment well played by Peck but wonderfully so by Mary Badham.

 

I have a daughter and we have a similar relationship and the scene sort of reminds me of us.

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tommyphils31 and I are sort of on the same page. I think *How Green is My Valley* is a great film, but I always choke up at the last scene, with young Roddie holding onto his dead father as they come up from the mine shaft. My dad's gone 30+ years and I still miss him.

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The section of *Moulin Rouge* in which Toulouse-Lautrec falls in love with the streetwalker -- a love that can never be returned -- the only time in his life he was fortunate enough to experience the real thing. "It's better to have loved and lost..." True.

 

In the original version of *Mutiny on the Bounty,* the chief tells Franchot Tone that he has no sons, and says, "Stay here. Be my son."

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There are quite a few other films that get to me, and I must say that a majority of them are related to my late father. Even if they are not obvious ones involving the death of a father, others remind me of my dad for other reasons. He, after all, was the one who introduced me to classic films from the time I was barely able to walk. I used to sit on the arm of his recliner and we would watch "John Wayne Theater" on Friday Night and "Dr Scar" (a local horror movie host) on Saturday Night together until I got too big and ended up on the floor. He was a tough as nails Battle of the Bulge veteran that like many of his generation rarely showed emotion. That is why it was always astonishing when he would break down at the end of "The Searchers". I don't know why that scene with Duke standing in the doorway got to him. Maybe it was the song that reminded him of the old B-movie cowboys and the cowboy music that he loved as a kid in the 30s. Needless to say I, along with my sister, carry on the tradition whenever viewing this movie, which is still one of my favorites, despite the tough to watch ending. As soon as that song starts, I'm a goner. The same thing used to happen at the end of "Beau Geste", and we carry on the tradition in that case also.

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The sad poignant ending of the great Australian movie of the Boer War: BREAKER MORANT 1980.

#1:

 

#2:

 

The scapegoats of sordid empire building. Never fails to get to me about the countless millions of soldiers who have died, been killed, maimed or executed in 10,000 years of human history for the imperial despotic policies and wars of conquest by megalomaniacs or megalomaniacal governments or megalomaniacal religions who cover themselves in flag/god waving lies.

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When the Apollo 13 crew comes back on the radio after their prolonged re-entry silence. Seen it a half a dozen times and it never fails.

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From a more personal standpoint, as an ex-ballplayer, certain baseball scenes get to me. Gary Cooper's "luckiest man on the face of the Earth" speech in "The Pride of the Yankees" is enough to get any viewer choked up, and is pretty obvious. More recently, the climactic home run in "The Natural" definitely makes my eyes a little misty. I suppose every guy who was, or thought he was, the fair-haired boy wishes they were Roy Hobbs. By the way, Redford really has terrific skills, maybe the best of any non-professional jock actor. His lefty swing was beautiful, and his defensive skills were excellent too. I am not sure, but that might be a decent future thread, what is the best athletic performance by a non-pro jock in a sports movie?

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Sounds like a good idea for a thread. I'd nominate Cooper; he looked convincing as Gehrig.

 

Also, Robert Redford in *Downhill Racer,* the only unsympathetic role I can recall him playing.

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Redford really is an impressive athlete. I hadn't thought of "Downhill Racer", but it makes sense. Redford is an avid skier, even now. I am not sure what sports, if any, he played as a kid, but it would not surprise me if he did. That could be a decent thread. TBA

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You bring up several excellent examples. I too like the home run scene from The Natural (1984). But to me there are two other more satisfying scenes from that movie that pulls the heart strings.

 

The first is the "Suit-Up" scene where Pop and Red are shaving and Pop starts talking about buying a farm. Enter Roy Hobbs.

 

 

 

The second scene that gets to me, probably more enjoyable as it does at pulling at my heart strings is the scene where Hobbs home run its the clock...

 

 

 

And then from basketball...

 

The scene before the championship game in Hoosiers. Gets me everytime.

 

 

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"Hoosiers" has plenty of misty eyed parts. Obviously the ending is one of them, but the scene where Shooter (Dennis Hopper) coaches the team to a victory is enough to stir my emotions every time. As a side bar, Maris Valainis (Jimmy, the best player) had a lot of skills.

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In a few hours TCM is airing *All Mine to Give* again. Warning, if you've never seen this film, make sure you have several boxes of Kleenex on hand.

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A common thread with many of the films that stir my emotions is probably obvious-- the music score. Watching Roy Hobbs round the bases to Randy Newman's rousing score might not be the only reason, but it certainly is a contributor. I mentioned the Sons of the Pioneers in "The Searchers". Another film that does it to me almost entirely because of the score is "Rocky". Bill Conti's music following the final bell always gets the waterworks going for me. I have never seen "All Mine To Give", which is on TCM within the hour. I have DVRd it because I won't be able to stay awake, but I will certainly see if I will be swimming as mrroberts predicts.

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The Best Years of Our Lives - The Homecoming

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ob4Hy-AAOUA

 

The Best Years Of Our Lives - Homecoming

 

 

White Christmas from Holiday Inn

 

 

I'm Dreaming Of A White Christmas - B. Crosby White Christmas 1954

 

 

John Wayne winning Best Actor for "True Grit"

 

 

"The Gathering "part 11 see 4:43

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LkoU_vgkd8

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John Wayne's acceptance speech-- absolutely!

 

Cary Grant's lifetime achievement Oscar presented by Frank is another one that makes me swim.

 

Pretty much most of the acceptance speeches of those not with us anymore are good candidates.

 

Duke and Henry Fonda's last appearances are downright sobbing material.

 

I did say that I am becoming a sentimental old cuss. I have been there for quite some time actually.

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Some of these aren't classic films; but:

 

1) "Marley and Me" now is absolutely the saddest thing ever. My childhood pet, a yellow Labrador (that we got when he was 8 weeks old) that I got in the 8th grade (my first and only pet ever) passed away November of 2012, two months shy of his 15th birthday. I was 28 years old and had never experienced a pet passing away. It was devastating. So watching Marley and Me, with a dog that looks exactly like my beloved dog and having him die at the end is heart wrenching.

 

2) The beginning of "Up" that shows the montage of Carl & Ellie growing up together, getting married, being newlyweds, finding out that they can't have children, them running up the hill, Ellie slowly losing the ability to run up the hill, her in a hospital room, Carl saying goodbye to her, and her passing away absolutely kills me. Then later in the movie, when Carl is looking through their "Adventure Book" and he finally flips past their pages of adventures and sees that Ellie left him a page telling him to have his own adventure is so incredibly sweet. My eyes start watering.

 

3) Wall-E when Wall-E almost dies and Eve rescues him by holding his hand. Oh. My. Gosh.

 

4) Toy Story 3, first when the toys are headed toward the incinerator and they all hold hands as they're facing their fate of being burned to a crisp. Then later, when Andy is leaving for college and he says goodbye to Woody. Darn you Pixar! Why do you do this to me!

 

5) My Girl. When Vada goes to Thomas J's funeral after he is killed by the bee stings and she interrupts the funeral crying and saying that he needed his glasses. He can't see without his glasses!

 

6) Bambi. When Bambi's mom is killed by the humans in the beginning of the film and you have to watch Bambi tearfully call for his mom.

 

7) The Lion King. When Mufasa is killed and Simba is trying to wake him up and realizes that he's dead.

 

8) The Neverending Story. When Artax drowns!

 

9) An Affair to Remember. When Cary Grant visits Deborah Kerr after she is paralyzed (after being hit by a car enroute to their date at the top of the Empire State Building) and realizes that she's the one who bought his painting.

 

10) Dumbo. When Dumbo's mom cradles him in her trunk, unable to see him; but sings him a lullaby while rocking him.

 

11) Love Actually when Emma Thompson sits and cries after Alan Rickman gives her a CD instead of the jewelry that she expected when she found it in his coat pocket.

 

I'm detecting a trend... I have an issue with death, especially in cartoons. Cartoons seem to affect me more than live action. Hmm... I have quite a list, I'm not one to cry or be all misty-eyed at movies (in fact, I tend to avoid movies that sound depressing. Especially animal movies when you know that the animal is going to die in the end); but sometimes the sadness sneaks up on you. Or unexpected things choke you up. I guess this proves for once and for all, that I'm not a robot!

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Actually, I'm sad when robots die. When the cyborg went to his death in *Terminator 2* I got all choked up.

 

As for Emma Thompson, I'd give her anything she wanted. And not a crummy CD, either.

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Speedracer, I have experienced similar feelings about the passing of a pet on several occasions (I'm a little older then you are) . Three dogs (2 German Sheps, and 1 "mutt"). The only consolation is that they all lived full long lives , like yours, and like "Marley".

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Watching EMBRACEABLE YOU (1948) last night rather choked me up at the end. Both who had been shortchanged by life for all their short existences are going down at the end. One to death and one to prison but for a short shining moment they lived in their own World of Love and Hope. Touching.

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fxreyman:

 

You have some real good ones there.

 

From White Christmas (1954), mine is when Dean Jagger walks in to the room full of his former soldiers.

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Two weepers for dog lovers:

 

Travis having to shoot *Old Yeller* who has gotten rabid saving the family.

 

Houch of *Turner and Houch* dying on the operating table after helping to bring in his master's murderer.

 

The silver linings: Yeller's son *Savage Sam* who gets his own movie and Houch's offspring who takes up where his old man left off.

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Terms of Endearment -- Debra Winger, dying, says goodbye to her two pre-teen sons.  "I think we handled that pretty well, don't you?"

 

An Affair to Remember -- Cary Grant comes to realize that the seated woman he's talking to is also the crippled woman who had bought his painting -- a portrait or her.

 

Bang the Drum Slowly -- The graveside funeral of the Robert De Niro character, and Michael Moriarty's final voiceover as he walks away from the scene. "From here on in, I rag nobody."

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