tommyphils31

What film or scene never fails to choke you up and why?

85 posts in this topic

I cry at everything because art moves me.

 

Seeing a charactor your involved with cry will instantly make you cry. The aforementioned BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES is full of "moments", but I lose it when Wilma tucks Homer in to bed and they close in on his face and a tear rolls down his cheek.

 

Bambi? What about the "Baby Mine" scene where Dumbo & his caged Mom caress trunks through the bars?

 

Heck, I cry every time I see the "star child" in 2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY. Ah the humanity!

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The Best Years of Our Lives is so full of scenes that me choke up, no matter how many times I've seen the film. When Fredric March and Myrna Loy see each other for the first time when he first arrives home. The scene of Dana's father after reading about Dana's bravery during the war. Practically all of Homer's scenes.That last scene of Dana telling Theresa they would be kicked around by life but then they embrace and kiss, the perfect ending.

 

Another film that chokes me up in many scenes is Lassie Come Home. There's the scene where some evil scoundrel's attack Edmund Gwenn and his little dog tries to bite the men who are beating up Edmund, one of the men kick the little dog and kill him.Gwenn holds his dead dog and cries. The last scene of Roddy and Lassie as Lassie limps his way to meet Roddy at school makes me cry every time.

 

Splendor in the Grass- that last scene as Natalie is driving away with her girlfriends,Natalie quotes the beautiful Wordsworth poem, that gets me every time. The music score throughout the film, gets me every time.

 

Maybe not so much now, but when I was a little girl, the scene of Margaret O'Brien killing her snowmen on the front lawn in Meet Me St. Louis brought me to tears.

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10) Dumbo. When Dumbo's mom cradles him in her trunk, unable to see him; but sings him a lullaby while rocking him.

 

 

 

I was chided by friends when I admitted that at this very scene, I too wept. This was a few years ago. A bit later I was reading some high-falutin literary magazine where two mighty English writers, way-up-there intellectual types, were expounding on abstruse matters when one suddenly talked about practically falling apart at this scene, calling it "quite extraordinary." Not that people like this are the go-to arbiters of such things but it did give me a measure of satisfaction that I wasn't just some pushover for a cartoon. Yep, I threw this at my chiding funs, didn't do any good though :-) .

 

The end of The Brother Karamazov (1958), when Dimitri (Yul Brynner) has to apologize to the old captain. (Spoiler) The old captain is indifferent about it but the eight-year-old son of the captain is fiercely proud and demands an acceptable apology for the honor of his father. Dimitri tries two half-baked apologies that the eight year old knows are false and shakes his head no to father, not good enough. Dimitri takes a deep breath and makes a true no-holds-barred apology, a devastating attack on his own humility, that strikes to the core. The child tearfully shakes yes to the father. Whew, great scene.

 

In The King and I, (Yul Brynner again, coincidentally), the song "A Man Who Needs Your Love." Actually this movie gets me in several places. The March of the Siamese Children, and the new king barking orders as the old king expires, probably elsewhere. My favorite musical, probably.

 

The restaurant scene, father and daughter having dinner, in Mr Skeffington.

 

Where Angels Fear To Tread (1990), a movie that is hated by everyone in the universe except me. Years ago I watched this movie over and over and it kills me throughout. The most consisently moving motion picture I have ever seen.

 

There are more, I'm sure...

 

==

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I tend to avoid films that pull on my heartstrings because I don't appreciate being pushed around, especially when I don't feel the film deserves that kind of reaction. Not to say I should judge things that way, but as a relatively sensitive person I like to retain distance.

 

Recently I saw a movie that made me weep like no other I've ever seen. It was The Children Are Watching Us by Vittorio De Sica. It was from the perspective of a little boy who is abandoned by his mother, she leaves him and his father for her lover. It was definitely a weeper, but such an effective one that for the first time I found respect for this genre which I usually resent. I've never seen such an emotional and true performance from such a young child, the crushing effect of these events can be seen in his eyes, and the true damage done in the heart-shattering final scene. I tried to stay emotionally distant from this film, but it was impossible, I just made myself feel ill.

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I tend to avoid films that pull on my heartstrings because I don't appreciate being pushed around, especially when I don't feel the film deserves that kind of reaction. Not to say I should judge things that way, but as a relatively sensitive person I like to retain distance.

 

 

I find there exist a sort of fail-safe that prevents me from being "pushed around" (manipulated). Namely, if a film doesn't "deserve that kind of reaction" then I won't give it one and can easily dismiss it. I don't like cheap sentiment either (if that's what you are referring to). But if I'm watching a film and something poignant is thrust upon me, I won't feel pushed around if I am won over, having honestly reacted to it. I think I hear you saying that you are not particularly fond of tear-jerkers; per se.: neither am I, they usually try too hard and they don't succeed with me, generally.

Edited by laffite

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Yes, that's the way I feel, as well. The difference in my case, perhaps, is that even films that I don't think deserve emotional reactions often strike an emotional chord in me against my better judgment, so I can't easily dismiss it and I resent it for making me all teary over something my intelligent half knows is stupid. It's not that I'm always weeping over every tearjerker, I seldom do, really, but I am surprised at how often I end up feeling hoodwinked by cliché. Sometimes I find myself tearing up with little emotion to explain it, in fact.

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Another film that chokes me up in many scenes is Lassie Come Home.

 

Hah, I won't even watch a "dog" movie. No way, I know it'll be a heartbreaker.

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Mine is Rise of the Planet of the Apes.  My cable company had a promotion several months ago where this was shown all weekend.  Nothing else was on so I watched.  It turned out to be the most emotionally devastating movie I've ever seen.  I was weeping from the scene when the ape, Caesar (played brilliantly by Andy Serkis), refuses to go back into his cage and says "No!" starting a rebellion.    A scene on the Golden Gate Bridge where a scarred research primate, Koba, confronts his abuser, and a final scene where Caesar says "Ceasar is home" had me unglued.  Thank heavens I wasn't in a movie theatre, as I would have to have been escorted out!

 

I've always been an "animal person," so their captivity and mistreatment is extremely hard to watch, and I avoid movies with animals, knowing something bad usually happens to them.  To team that with a movie showing their release and ultimate triumph just did me in.  It's the only movie where I had to have a stiff drink afterward.

 

 

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This one, but not until he realizes E.T. is alive--the joy and excitement on his face is priceless. Either that kid was a great actor or Steven Speilberg just knew how to get the best out of him.

 

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The "miracle" moment in THE MIRACLE WORKER.  You take this journey with them, and this is the pay off.   The entire scene is so perfectly played (well, the entire film is so perfectly played)!  The acting is superb and the musical underscoring is, too.

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The ending of "Breakfast at Tiffany's". It's your basic Hollywood happy ending (which was NOT in the Truman Capote novella". But when Audrey Hepburn decides to stay...and she hugs George Peppard...AND she finds Cat huddling in the rain, with the wonderful Henry Mancini music in the background...I tear up. Every. Single. Time.

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Please don't read if you haven't seen this movie!

 

The ending of Day of the Dolphin (an underrated movie in my book) is sad beyond words.  George C. Scott's character must tell the dolphins to leave and swim out to sea, as their lives are in danger.  He and Trish Van Devere's (wish she had made more movies) character turned their backs on the dolphins and walked away, the dolphins watching.  They sat under a tree out of sight of the dolphins, devastated, as the movie ended.  Just typing this I am in tears.  I hope Mike Nichols knows how much some of us deeply appreciated this movie.

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Random Harvest's ending always gets me.

 

Well of course it does since you must be a Garson fan!    (hey,  it gets me also).    Note I really wasn't much of a Garson fan until she was featured as SOTM.      Yet again,  TCM helped me see the light.

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Well of course it does since you must be a Garson fan!    (hey,  it gets me also).    Note I really wasn't much of a Garson fan until she was featured as SOTM.      Yet again,  TCM helped me see the light.

 

That's what happened to me with Joan Crawford, who was SOTM in January. I saw quite a few of her films and am trying to come up with a tearjerker. No luck so far. Tears of rage, maybe. After watching one of her movies, I tend not to want to cry. I think I would rather go out on a Search and Destroy mission.

:P

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I may have answered this thread awhile ago, but I can't remember if I did and if so, what I said.  Anyway, I'll answer it again:

 

I don't know what is up with me and Disney and Pixar, but they have quite a few moments in their films that choke me up. 

 

Bambi- I don't think I even need to explain which part and why; but Bambi's mom getting shot and Bambi finding out what happened after he is safe.

 

Dumbo- the song that Mrs. Dumbo sings while rocking Dumbo to sleep from inside her cage.

 

The Lion King- when Mufasa is killed in the stampede and Simba is trying to revive him

 

Up- The entire opening scene showing Carl and Ellie's marriage.  They get married, Ellie finds out she can't have children, Ellie starts losing the ability to run up the hill, Ellie and Carl find out that Ellie is sick, she ends up in a hospital room and later passes away.  Then later, in the movie, when Carl opens the Adventure book that he and Ellie maintained and he finally flips past the page depicting his and Ellie's dream adventure and sees that Ellie has left him with instructions to have his own adventure.

 

Wall-E- when Wall-E almost dies and Eva is trying to revive him and finally does by holding his hand-- just like they do in his favorite movie Hello Dolly!

 

Toy Story 3- First when all the toys hold hands as they face their fate of being burned alive in the incinerator and later, when Andy says goodbye to all his toys and has then has the most heart-wrenching goodbye ever when he says goodbye to Woody. 

 

--Non Disney movies--

 

Marley and Me- This movie is sad because Marley looked exactly like and acted like my dog who passed away a couple years ago at 14 (he would have been 15 in two months).  When they have to put Marley down is the saddest thing.  Especially for me since my dog is gone. 

 

Homeward Bound- When old Shadow stays behind and tells Chance that he needs to say goodbye and be on his own. 

 

Land Before Time- When Littlefoot's mom dies

 

Charlotte's Web- After Charlotte dies and Wilbur meets her babies that hatched.

 

My Girl- Macaulay Culkin, who is allergic to bees, ends up getting stung by a million bees trying to find his best friend Vada's ring.  He ends up dying and Vada has the more heartwrenching scene at the funeral trying to cope with her friend's death.  Where are his glasses? He can't see without his glasses!

 

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There are several movie scenes that still get me all 'choked up' even though I've seen the film many times.  Here are a couple:

 

1. At the end of TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE, when Tim Holt explains he's really "only out a couple of hundred bucks when you come right down to it.  That's nothing compared to what Dobsy lost".

 

2. Frank Morgan giving out the presents in THe Wizard of Oz.

 

3. THe end of It's A Wonderful Life when James Stewart's brother arrives on Christmas night.

 

4. The ending of STRAWBERRY BLONDE when James Cagney realizes that everything worked out great for him.... and how life would have been had he married the Strawberry Blonde.

 

just  a few for me.

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There are several movie scenes that still get me all 'choked up' even though I've seen the film many times.  Here are a couple:

 

1. At the end of TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE, when Tim Holt explains he's really "only out a couple of hundred bucks when you come right down to it.  That's nothing compared to what Dobsy lost".

 

2. Frank Morgan giving out the presents in THe Wizard of Oz.

 

3. THe end of It's A Wonderful Life when James Stewart's brother arrives on Christmas night.

 

4. The ending of STRAWBERRY BLONDE when James Cagney realizes that everything worked out great for him.... and how life would have been had he married the Strawberry Blonde.

 

just  a few for me.

 

Some great choices there.  Good to see The Strawberry Blonde get a mention.   This is one of my favorite films and the one that made me fall for Olivia DeHavilland.     The movie also had a major impact on my life.   I was engaged to a Strawberry Blonde type.  Yea,  she was good looking but selfish.    After seeing this movie I really wondered if I was making the right choice.   I broke it off two weeks before the wedding date.    It took me years to find a gal like the DeHavilland character in the movie.   But I did and it has been a great marriage for over 17 years now.

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One of the final scenes of LOVERS AND OTHER STRANGERS (1970).  When Bea Arthur says to Richard Castellano at the end:  "I can understand Joan thinking about divorce, but I can't understand her actually doing it".  I'm not quoting verbatim, but I've seen the movie 4 times and with the music and dialogue that scene always makes think sad thoughts.  Then Castellano says something like "Stupid sister Pauline!".  'Joan' was played by a very young, freckle-faced Diane Keaton.   

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