tommyphils31

What film or scene never fails to choke you up and why?

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There are loads of scenes from movies which have made me shed loads of tears. One is that scene from 'A Walk to Remember' where Mandy Moore tells Shane West that she has leukemia and doesn't have much longer to live since she hasn't been responding t the treatment. There's another movie based on a novel - P.S. I Love You - which makes me super emotional every time I watch it. Each time Hilary Swank gets down to reading one of her late husband's letters, it is so touching... And recently, I watched the 3D animation movie How to Train Your Dragon 2 - now who would ever have imagined that a kids' animation movie could make one cry? But I did, when Hiccup was trying to get back Toothless from the evil villain's grip by telling him how much he means to him, even though his dad died due to his own pet dragon's mistake. Made me very emotional.

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White Oleander:  Alison Lohman goes to a comic book store in the hope of contacting her boyfriend who has moved across the country without knowing his destination; he told her he would keep in touch with this store.  She mentions her friend's name, and the clerk interrupts her: "You're Astrid?" She confirms that she is, and he asks her to wait.  He produces a pile of envelopes and small packages, held together with a rubber band.  She holds the bundle to her chest, and her black, Goth-styled lips twist in a smile she can not control.  Minimalist, but very effective.  A good scene.

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The final scenes, both versions, of The Champ.

 

What is so sad about the ending of The Champ?   :)     Yea,  I have seen the orignal Jackie Cooper version multiple times so the last time TCM played it I was watching something else.   But the show I was watching ended so I went to TCM.   Well the movie was just starting to play that last scene.  I was planning on watching it.   My wife said;  turn to something else please,   I don't want to experience that at this time'.     She doesn't ask this very often but Whose Afraid of Virgina Woolf does cause a similar reaction.

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I've never been able to watch the ending of The Bicycle Thief without being profoundly moved.

 

SPOILER'S ALERT FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN'T SEEN THIS FILM:

 

After spending most of the film searching in vain for his stolen bicycle (which he needs for his job), a man tells his small son who has accompanied him in that search to go home. The lad walks away but, unbeknowst to the man, turns back to take another look at his father.

 

It is at this moment that the man makes a mad dash, out of desperation, to steal another bike. He is caught by a small crowd of angry citizens as he tries to get away, slapped around to a degree and yelled at. The man is in shock, ashamed and humiliated by this public berating.

 

As this happens, his small son breaks through the angry crowd crying. He grabs at his father, shouting, "Poppa."

 

Members of the crowd call for the bike's owner to call the police but when the owner sees the son he relents. The man is sent away, pushed by the crowd, yelled at to never come back to that area of town.

 

The man walks away in shock, staring straight ahead, his son, now trying to dry his tears, walking beside him, looking up at his father.

 

As the man and his son slowly disappear into a crowd, the man starts to weep.

 

THE END

 

It's a searingly honest portrayal of a little tragic moment in life experienced by a small, anonymous man who, in essence, represents so many. The man paid a price for an impulsive wrong headed act. Adding to the pain of his public humiliation is his knowledge that his son, who adores him, witnessed it all.

 

I can't watch this scene without feeling the man's pain. When he starts to weep, I do too.

 

Accompanying it all the soundtrack is filled with one of the most lonely sounding musical scores that I've ever heard, both beautiful and sad.

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I've never been able to watch the ending of The Bicycle Thief without being profoundly moved.

 

SPOILER'S ALERT FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN'T SEEN THIS FILM:

 

After spending most of the film searching in vain for his stolen bicycle (which he needs for his job), a man tells his small son who has accompanied him in that search to go home. The lad walks away but, unbeknowst to the man, turns back to take another look at his father.

 

It is at this moment that the man makes a mad dash, out of desperation, to steal another bike. He is caught by a small crowd of angry citizens as he tries to get away, slapped around to a degree and yelled at. The man is in shock, ashamed and humiliated by this public berating.

 

As this happens, his small son breaks through the angry crowd crying. He grabs at his father, shouting, "Poppa."

 

Members of the crowd call for the bike's owner to call the police but when the owner sees the son he relents. The man is sent away, pushed by the crowd, yelled at to never come back to that area of town.

 

The man walks away in shock, staring straight ahead, his son, now trying to dry his tears, walking beside him, looking up at his father.

 

As the man and his son slowly disappear into a crowd, the man starts to weep.

 

THE END

 

It's a searingly honest portrayal of a little tragic moment in life experienced by a small, anonymous man who, in essence, represents so many. The man paid a price for an impulsive wrong headed act. Adding to the pain of his public humiliation is his knowledge that his son, who adores him, witnessed it all.

 

I can't watch this scene without feeling the man's pain. When he starts to weep, I do too.

 

Accompanying it all the soundtrack is filled with one of the most lonely sounding musical scores that I've ever heard, both beautiful and sad.

 

I feel very differently about the ending.    The guy should have been beaten for stealing the bike.   But the owner decided to forgive him and asked the crowd to let him go.     So I don't see what there is to weep about other then he was a misguided and made a mistake.   He deserved the public humiliation and that was better then getting arrested or beaten.

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I feel very differently about the ending.    The guy should have been beaten for stealing the bike.   But the owner decided to forgive him and asked the crowd to let him go.     So I don't see what there is to weep about other then he was a misguided and made a mistake.   He deserved the public humiliation and that was better then getting arrested or beaten.

I think the man was a flawed human being, like all of us, who made a mistake. And it was a mistake of an impulsive nature, not planned at all.

 

Clearly he was wrong to have tried to steal the bike. But, considering the travails that he had already been through in vain to try to find his own bicycle first, combined with the fact that he needed a bike in order to support his family, you make a far harsher judgement on his attempted theft than do I. Nor do I think this is a man that deserved a beating.

 

In spite of the anger of that crowd, the bike's owner showed that he was capable of some compassion, if only because of the boy. However, the emotional pain that the man feels over his son's knowledge of his act adds immeasurably to his humiliation, and will be far worse for him to bear, in the long run, than the cuts and bruises (and even possible broken bones) that he might have received from that crowd.

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I think the man was a flawed human being, like all of us, who made a mistake. And it was a mistake of an impulsive nature, not planned at all.

 

Clearly he was wrong to have tried to steal the bike. But, considering the travails that he had already been through in vain to try to find his own bicycle first, combined with the fact that he needed a bike in order to support his family, you make a far harsher judgement on his attempted theft than do I. Nor do I think this is a man that deserved a beating.

 

In spite of the anger of that crowd, the bike's owner showed that he was capable of some compassion, if only because of the boy. However, the emotional pain that the man feels over his son's knowledge of his act adds immeasurably to his humiliation, and will be far worse for him to bear, in the long run, than the cuts and bruises (and even possible broken bones) that he might have received from that crowd.

 

Yea,  I didn't state it very well related to 'deserved a beating'.    I should have said that he should have expected a beating.   He should have also expected that if he was caught how that would impact his son.  But as you noted it was an impulsive act.   But I still  don't see what is so sad about it.   In fact I find it uplifting.   The owner does show compassion,  he is let go and he and his son learned something.     

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Yea,  I didn't state it very well related to 'deserved a beating'.    I should have said that he should have expected a beating.   He should have also expected that if he was caught how that would impact his son.  But as you noted it was an impulsive act.   But I still  don't see what is so sad about it.   In fact I find it uplifting.   The owner does show compassion,  he is let go and he and his son learned something.     

Uplifting? Really?

 

Yes, the man may have learned something, not to try to steal, but at what price? Knowing that his son (who, again, has adored him throughout the film) now knows that he's a thief. And how is it uplifting for the son to see his father performing a wrong act and being pushed around by a crowd for it?

 

This man's mistake, I feel, is one that many of us (perhaps even most) could have made at an impulsive moment of weakness. I think that for the man to know that he has tarnished his young son's image of him is a harsh penalty to pay. With time that may disappear, who knows?

 

We have no idea what the man's future will be except that at the end he is without a job - just like at the beginning, compounded by the humiliation of being a caught thief. Everything that the man has gone through in the film has been for nothing.

 

Circumstances of poverty have created this story.

 

I find it a profoundly sad ending.

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Uplifting? Really?

 

Yes, the man may have learned something, not to try to steal, but at what price? Knowing that his son (who, again, has adored him throughout the film) now knows that he's a thief. And how is it uplifting for the son to see his father performing a wrong act and being pushed around by a crowd for it?

 

This man's mistake, I feel, is one that many of us (perhaps even most) could have made at an impulsive moment of weakness. I think that for the man to know that he has tarnished his young son's image of him is a harsh penalty to pay. With time that may disappear, who knows?

 

We have no idea what the man's future will be except that at the end he is without a job - just like at the beginning, compounded by the humiliation of being a caught thief. Everything that the man has gone through in the film has been for nothing.

 

Circumstances of poverty have created this story.

 

I find it a profoundly sad ending.

 

I don't think the leason was related to not stealing but more not to do thing that would make his son feel he was a lessor man. As for the overall poverty in Italy at the time.   Well since many of my wife's in-law came to the USA around the same time as this story,  I guess I feel this guy does the same and now he is retire in Boca and his son runs a trust fund on Wall Street.

 

But really,  I didn't get the sense there was no future hope.    I felt it was just the end of a very bad day in the life. 

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A few scenes from older films and a few from newer ones:

 

All the scenes mentioned by most of the posters who referred to The Best Days of Our Lives.

 

The scene in Lost Horizon when Ronald Colman is leaving Shangri-LA and the scene in the end that suggests he comes back.  I have always been incredibly haunted by both those scenes and Colman's expression of melancholy and longing as he leaves.

 

The scene on the train in Stella Dallas when Stella overhears her daughter's friends making fun of her, and her daughter later joins her in the sleeping berth to comfort her.

 

The scene in Mr. Deeds' goes to town after Deeds is confronted by the desperate man who wants to shoot him who breaks down and tells his story.  Cooper says nothing -- but the expression on his face is incredibly moving.  Coop was one of the most underrated actors.

 

The farewell scene between Errol Flynn and Olivia deHavilland in They DIed with Their Boots on.

 

I cried the last time I saw Funny Face.  I saw it in HD on my TV, and I remembered it as being one of the last movies I saw with my father; I know it's a good movie, but seeing it in HD, I thought it was so beautiful and I was happy that Astaire and Hepburn had brought him so much pleasure.

 

More recent films -- I wept through most of Philomena.

 

I know many hate Les Miserables, but I wept both times I saw it -- at Ann Hathaway's "I Dreamed a Dream," at Eddie Redmayne's "Empty Chairs" (after the death of his comrades), and during Valjean's last song at his death.  My dad had passed the year before, and Jackman's features reminded me of him.  The first time I saw it, I wept for about 20 minutes afterward.

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Steel Magnolias  (1989).  Dolly Parton has dressed up to go to the funeral of the Julia Roberts character.  She is slightly surprised that her husband (Sam Shepard) is also going.  Turns out he is going in support of the new widower (Dylan McDermott).  Seemingly unaware of his listener, Shepard muses, "Just think about it, him losing Shelby like that.  Something like that happened to me, I don't know what I'd do."  She just smiles silently at this unconscious tribute.

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Flashback:  I love Steel Magnolias and think Truvy and Spud were the most realistic of the couples in the film.  They seemed to just miss connecting all through the film until this moment.  Spud was the stereotypical Southern male; he loved his wife but his code of manliness made him keep it inside.  Truvy now knew his true feelings-he loved her as she did him-and could roll with rest of their life together.  Sam and Dolly both nailed their roles.     

 

Doesn't the end-Sammy going to his child's birth in a rabbit suit-remind you of I Love Lucy's Ricky being at Little Ricky's birth in a witch doctor's getup?  This whole film is full of tearful scenes funny and sad; it makes me wish I'd lived there. 

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The scene in 2001, A Space Odyssey, where Hall the computer is dismantled and sings Daisy as he is fading, is very upsetting to me.  

 

Somehow I'm more affected by animals or computers than people, at least in the movies.

 

Just found this interesting tidbit at Wikipedia:

 

Hal's version of the popular song "Daisy Bell" (referred to by Hal as "Daisy" in the film) was inspired by a computer-synthesized arrangement by Max Mathews, which Arthur C. Clarke had heard in 1962 at the Bell Laboratories Murray Hill facility when he was, coincidentally, visiting friend and colleague John Pierce. At that time, a speech synthesis demonstration was being performed by physicist John Larry Kelly, Jr., by using an IBM 704 computer to synthesize speech. Kelly's voice recorder synthesizer vocoder recreated the song "Daisy Bell" ("Bicycle Built For Two"), with Max Mathews providing the musical accompaniment. Arthur C. Clarke was so impressed that he later used it in the screenplay and novel."[115

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The last hour of Ben Hur always gets me in tears largely because of Miklos Rozsa's score.  Rather than a mournful dirge at the death of Jesus he gives us a bright, upbeat melody that combined with the rain/blood mix watering the dry land explains more than any sermon what we Christians believe about why it all took place.  Juda's change from revengeful to forgiving man before he learns his family has been healed is the near-perfect ending.  Yes, I know, there's no Resurrection scene but I guess they were trying to reach all audiences and we know how to add our own.

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1970's Sometimes a Great Notion, re-issue title Never Give a Inch

(1,807)

 

Lumberjacks at work, when a tragic accident happens.  A felled tree falls in the wrong direction, at the edge of a river, and a man is trapped underneath.  He is sitting in soft mud, relatively unhurt, but the log is too massive to lift off his lap.  And the river is rising; Joe Ben Stamper (Richard Jaeckel) is going to die.

 

His brother, Hank Stamper, (Paul Newman) judges the situation accurately:  They are working alone; gear that might be helpful is miles away, no possibility of getting help in time.  He does not make a useless mad-dash gesture.  He stays with Joe Ben, to keep him from dying alone.

 

The water level rises; the men converse and do not lose courage.  When it's all over, Hank nails the sleeve of Joe Ben's shirt to the log, then ties a red cloth to one of the limbs left on the trunk.  He knows that the rising river will eventually lift the log and let it float.  He later instructs the people downstream who wait for the logs to come to where they are corralled, "Watch for the log with a red flag.  Joe Ben's nailed to it."

 

Harrowing sequence.  Very effectively done.

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Every time I cry with this one: Hattie McDaniel walking up the steps of the Butler house with Olivia de Havilland after Bonnie died in Gone with the Wind. I can't keep it together. Her dialogue, the voice constricted with grief, the crying, wiping her eyes, her worry for the both of them. She knows Scarlett, only to well, and Rhett had grown on her, and she has no idea how they will fare and what is going to happen because of this tragedy. She was wonderful. And knowing that the poor girl died, what happened to the pony, and that the always contained Rhett is a mess. It is too much.

 

Myra keeping the newspaper article contents from Roy's mother when they have tea in Waterloo Bridge. It was so tense and so sad what Vivien's character was going through. And then later knowing that whole scene where she tells her that she can't marry Roy and how why, is insinuated. Gut-wrenching. I can only watch that movie every few years. 

 

Clark Gable in the Misfits, calling for his son and falling off the car into a heap on the ground. And the scene leading up to it as it built up. He was wonderful. It's heart-wrenching.

Even worse knowing it is his last picture. He was excellent, and you wonder always, if he had lived, maybe he would have made some more.

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Every time I cry with this one: Hattie McDaniel walking up the steps of the Butler house with Olivia de Havilland after Bonnie died in Gone with the Wind. I can't keep it together. Her dialogue, the voice constricted with grief, the crying, wiping her eyes, her worry for the both of them. She knows Scarlett, only to well, and Rhett had grown on her, and she has no idea how they will fare and what is going to happen because of this tragedy. She was wonderful. And knowing that the poor girl died, what happened to the pony, and that the always contained Rhett is a mess. It is too much.

 

Myra keeping the newspaper article contents from Roy's mother when they have tea in Waterloo Bridge. It was so tense and so sad what Vivien's character was going through. And then later knowing that whole scene where she tells her that she can't marry Roy and how why, is insinuated. Gut-wrenching. I can only watch that movie every few years. 

 

Clark Gable in the Misfits, calling for his son and falling off the car into a heap on the ground. And the scene leading up to it as it built up. He was wonderful. It's heart-wrenching.

Even worse knowing it is his last picture. He was excellent, and you wonder always, if he had lived, maybe he would have made some more.

 

Great choice of scenes.     You have fine taste.    Oh, and I just love Asta.    He should have received a special Oscar!

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Great choice of scenes.     You have fine taste.    Oh, and I just love Asta.    He should have received a special Oscar!

 

Thanks! Yup, Asta Charles is the man! Uh, dog.

 

 

And I knew I forgot some, but this one just popped up, because I remember being so moved and bawling. Well, Claude Rains killed me in every scene. But when his daughter starts crying over ice cream and begs to go with him in Mr. Skeffington. His hurt face in most of the movie is just too much. He always tries to be a gentleman, and kind, and move forward, but man…the eyes and the hurt face. I can't…he is so great! He can be doing so much, without a lot of noise and movement. 

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The final scene in *Shane.*

Also In Shane.  The burial of a farmer who had been gunned down by one of the hired hands from the other side of the conflict.  As the coffin is lowered into the ground, the man's dog, whimpering, puts a paw on the coffin as it goes lower.

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The final scenes in ODD MAN OUT.  Johnny has been betrayed and abandoned by everyone (except Kathleen and even her motives are selfish).  When he walks away from the girls in the phone booth and out of camera, it's as if he no longer belongs to any human community.  Actually, I start getting choked up about halfway through the movie.

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The final scenes in ODD MAN OUT.  Johnny has been betrayed and abandoned by everyone (except Kathleen and even her motives are selfish).  When he walks away from the girls in the phone booth and out of camera, it's as if he no longer belongs to any human community.  Actually, I start getting choked up about halfway through the movie.

 

The final scenes in Odd Man Out are moving,  but my choice would be the final scene in The Breaking Point (John Garfield) where the little boy is left all alone wondering where his dad is.   

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To Live (Huo Zhe) 1994

 

After being away from home for a year or so (after unexpectedly being impressed into the Chinese Nationalist army, and then into the Chinese Communist army), Fugui returns home in the dark of the early morning to find his wife and little girl working on a dimly lit street, selling hot water to make what money they can to survive.

 

He first sees a little girl walking from one door to another, gathering wicker-insulated water bottles, and collecting the money beneath them.

 

“Fengxia?” he says, but she doesn’t respond. “Fengxia!” he says a little louder, as she turns from the doorstep.

 

This time she sees him and stops.

 

He walks up to her, sets down the wooden box he is carrying, and gets down on one knee. “Fengxia,” he says, “it’s your daddy.”

 

Once she realizes who he is, she gives him a beautiful little smile that could make any parent forget a whole lifetime of troubles.

 

“What are you doing?” he asks. But Fengxia only grins and shakes her head.

 

“Where’s mommy?” he asks. She turns her head and looks down the street.

 

He turns to see a woman in the distance with a child strapped to her back, bent over a wooden cart, filling up water bottles. As the woman looks over the cart at him, he sees that it is his wife.

 

He gets to his feet with a stunned look on his face, staring at her as if he cannot believe his eyes.

 

She looks back at him, straightens up a bit, and repositions the child on her back.

 

As he begins to walk toward her, the woman’s eyes start to fill with a deep sadness.

 

“Jiazhen!” he shouts, as he breaks into a run.

 

She takes a few steps forward, but hesitantly stops.

 

“Jiazhen!” he calls again.

 

As he nears her, he slows down and stops in front of her, his eyes full of relief, happiness, and love.

 

“I’m home,” he says. “Home.”

 

Jiazhen’s eyes fill with tears; she pulls him close, puts her head on his shoulder, and begins to weep bitterly.

 

[Cue erhu.]

 

[Cut to long shot.]

 

In the distance, Fugui and Jaizhen stand in the middle of a dim street holding each other, as Jaizhen’s heart-wrenching sobs echo off of the rows of houses.

 

She sinks to her knees, but Fugui lifts her back up and holds her close.

 

 

Annnnnnnnd cut!

 

I have no doubt that I could get through that scene more-or-less unmoved, except for Jiazhen’s (played by Gong Li) terribly sorrowful crying. Gong Li can convincingly cry like no other actress I’ve ever seen or heard. Just the sound of it touches some sort of nerve of empathy in me that gets me all teared up.

 

God help me if I’m ever in a relationship with a woman who cries like Gong Li. I am unmoved by most crying, and if I have even the slightest sense that the crying is manipulative in nature, my heart automatically becomes granite. But Gong’s crying – which, being acting, is inherently manipulative (go figure) -- is some sort of super lethal Ninja crying. After a few well-placed boo-hoos of that caliber, I would be completely defenseless.

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From the Pink Floyd movie "The Wall" - "Goodbye Blue Sky"

 

I recall what I felt when I saw this for the first time at the movie theater.

 

 I remember seeing the movie "The Wall", and noticing this particular scene for the first time, at a now-defunct movie theatre just outside Harvard Square, in Cambridge, MA.  The "Goodbye, Blue Sky" scene has certainly been playing itself out in real life for ages.  Pretty horrific, imho.

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